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WAYNE  COUNTY: 1900-1999


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( 1940 )


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P A L M Y R A
________________________
________________________

WAYNE COUNTY, NEW YORK



Still o'er these scenes my memory wakes
And fondly broods with miser care,
Time but the impression deeper makes
As streams their channels deeper wear.

                        -- ROBERT BURNS.




COMPILED  BY
THE  WOMAN'S  SOCIETY  OF  THE
WESTERN  PRESBYTERIAN  CHURCH
MCMVII







[ 2 ]







Copyrighted by
The Western Presbyterian Church
1907.







The Herald Press, Rochester, N. Y.






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P A L M Y R A

In the winter of 1788-9 John Swift and Colonel John Jenkins purchased Tract 12, Range 2, now Palmyra, and commenced the survey of it into farm lots in March. Thus wrote Orsamus Turner in his "History of the Pioneer Settlement of the Phelps and Gorham Purchase."

Swift and Jenkins, sent out from the Wyoming Valley Settlement after the Pennamite War, were ad vance agents for those dissatisfied pioneers. Trouble between the Indians and Jenkins and his associates made an end to this Pennsylvania movement.

John Swift bought out Jenkins and went to New England to encourage migration to his tract. During the summer of 1789 Swift returned to this then west and built a log house with a store house at the junction of the present Main and Canal Streets.

Before the close of the same year Webb Harwood, the second permanent settler, brought in his family from Adams, Massachusetts. Many families separate or in company closely followed. William Jackway, John Hurlburt, Jonathan Millett, Nathan Parshall, Barney Horton and Mrs. Tiffany came from Wyoming.




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[ Image: General John Swift ]








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[ Image: Primeval Oak, on the Theodore Whitlock Farm, Spared by John Swift. ]


Captain James Galloway came from Monroe, Orange County, to the farm where his son still lives -- 1907.

Cummington, Massachusetts, sent Lemuel Spear -- the third settler -- and a few months later, Noah Porter, David Warner and David White.

Gideon and Edward Durfee of Tiverton, Rhode Island, came on foot from Albany. Fast on them fol lowed mostly in bateaux -- twelve others of the Durfee family. The advent of Gideon Durfee was most opportune. He payed in coin for his 1,600 acres, thus

[ Image: Site of First House. ]





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enabling Swift to meet his indebtedness to the Phelps and Gorham company, and to secure a warranty deed of the town.

Beside the Durfees, Rhode Island sent to Tolland -- as Palmyra was called -- Isaac Springer, William, James and Thomas Rogers, Festus and Isaac Goldsmith, Humphrey Sherman, Zebulon Williams, Weaver Osborne, David Wilcox, and Nathan Harris, father of Martin Harris.

In 1792 Elias Reeves, Abraham Foster, William Hopkins, Luther Sanford and Joel Foster, representing the Long Island company, took a deed from Swift for 5,500 acres along the Ganargua creek. On Monday, April 4, 1792, the colonists set sail on Heady creek, near Southampton, Long Island, for their new home five hundred miles to the north and westward. It was a tedious trip with long, hard carries but was accom plished in twenty-eight days.

Many a thrilling tale of conflict with the Indians or abounding wild animals is told. The former were so feared that a block house was begun on the brow of Wintergreen hill. It was not finished for the victories of Mad Anthony Wayne set the pioneers at rest.

Many a pretty romance was lived here in the woods. Clarissa Wilcox, daughter of David and Ruth Durfee Wilcox, went to the door to give a thirsty hunter a drink. Ambrose Hall returned to his home in Lanesboro, Massachusetts, but soon came back to




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[ Image: Elm on Wilcox Farm. ]


marry his Rebekah and to settle. Two of their daugh ters married Leonard and Lawrence Jerome, Palmyra boys, who became Wall Street financiers.

For a short time the settlements in Tract 12, Range 2, were called after John Swift; then Tolland until January 4, 1796, when a meeting was held to choose a permanent name. Daniel Sawyer, brother-in-law to Swift, was engaged to Miss Dosha Boughton, the first school mistress. He had been reading ancient history and had concluded if Zenobia had a Palmyra his queen should dwell there, too. Therefore he pro posed the name, which was adopted.




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[ Image: Palmyra East from Prospect Hill. ]


Until 1823, when the present Wayne County was formed, Palmyra was included in Ontario County.

Palmyra held her first town meeting and elected her first officers at the house of Gideon Durfee, in April, 1796.

In 1812 Macedon was set off. Palmyra village was incorporated March 29, 1827, while the first village election was held at the house of Lovell Hurd, Febru ary 4, 1828, when the following officers were elected: Trustees, Joseph Colt, president, Joel Thayer, Thomas

[ Image: Palmyra West from Prospect Hill. ]






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Rogers, Nathaniel H. Beckwith and James White; clerk, Thomas P. Baldwin; treasurer, William Parke; assessors, George N. Williams, Alvah Hendee and George Beckwith; fire wardens, Stephen Ackley, Pliny Sexton and Benjamin Throop.

On February 19 it was voted to buy an engine and ladders, and to provide water to be used in case of fire. That May twenty men organized a fire company, which has grown into the well equipped Volunteer Firemen of Palmyra with some eighty members, and with three organizations -- the Steamer and Hose Company, the Sexton Hydrant Hose Company, and the Protective Hook and Ladder Company.

Palmyra postoffice was established in 1806 with Dr. Azel Ensworth the first postmaster. The Doctor kept the first public house in the corporation. It stood on the site of the present Methodist church and was opened in 1792. In 1796 Louis Philippe of France stopped on his return from Niagara at the log tavern opened by Gideon Durfee where the George Townsend house now stands. The present Powers Hotel, built where a succession of hostelries have stood, was erect ed about 1835 by a company of public spirited men, who sold it to the genial host the late William P. Nottingham. As the Palmyra House he kept it nearly thirty years.

Robert Town, the earliest settled physician, was in Palmyra but a short time. As early as 1800, possi bly before, he was succeeded by Dr. Gain Robinson




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from Cummington, Massachusetts. Once when Dr. Robinson desired counsel he sent to his old home for Dr. Bryant, father of the poet, who hurried here on horseback. Dr. Robinson lived at the head of Main street where now resides Mr. Pliny S. Aldrich. In his office studied Alexander Mclntyre an allopath, and Durfee Chase, a homeopath -- afterwards local prac titioners. To-day doctors of both schools minister to the sick.

Palmyra's first lawyer was John Comstock. Other early barristers were Judge Tiffany, Judge Hiram K. Jerome and Justice Theron R. Strong. Well equipped men have been and are to-day their successors.

Zebulon Williams was the first storekeeper in a log house near the present Central station. The first emporium in the corporation was kept by Major Joseph Colt on the west corner of Main and Market streets.

Patrick O'Rouke, Samuel Jennings, Alvah Hen dee, James and Orren White, who erected the first two story brick building, -- all these were forerunners of Joel Foster, George, Nathaniel and Baruch Beck with, J. C. Lovett, David Sanford, the Thayers, Lasher and Candee, William Jarvis, James Jenner, Birdsall and Sanford, Edwin Anderson, Sr., Bowman and Walker, W. H. Farnham, M. Story, and many another successful business man.

William Wilson, Henry Jessup, George Palmer, and Wells Anderson -- in the order named -- were early tanners.




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[ Image: Powers Hotel. ]








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[ Image: Eagle Hotel. ]








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[ Image: Flag Pole. Corner of Main and Fayette Streets. ]


Salmon Hathaway kept a saddlery on the site of the present Village Hall, while Calvin Perrine opened the first carding mill and clothiery. Edward Durfee and Jonah Hall operated the pioneer grist mill and saw mill.




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[ Image: Elms Overlooking Site of the First Grist Mill,
on the Charles R. Harrison Farm. ]


In 1823 Pliny Sexton, later associated with Martin Butterfield, brought to his the first hardware store the first cooking stove. He was the pioneer silver smith, and introduced sewing machines in the community.

To-day Palmyra boasts many good shops dry goods, hardware, jewelry, drug, grocery, and shoe stores.

Different factories have been located here. At present the Globe Manufacturing Co. -- 1864 -- now the Peerless, and J. M. Jones & Co. -- 1871 -- now Chandler




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[ Images: Village Hall. Erected 1868.
The Palmyra Union Agricultural Society. ]







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[ Image: The Garlock Packing Company. ]







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and Price, make printing presses or their parts. In the early eighties the Garlock Packing Company was formed by Olin J. Garlock, inventor of a packing for steam engines. The Crandall Packing Co.; the Dealers Packing Co.; the Triumph Packing Co.; Williamson Bros., cigar manufacturers; the Drake Box Factory; the Cator Dump Wagon Co.; the Sessions Cement Plant, -- the list makes a goodly showing.

[ Image: The Triumph Packing Company. ]

In January, 1868, the Village Hall was completed. Since 1857 gas has been supplied to the village, while electricity was first furnished in 1894. The water system was installed in 1890.

June 26, 1856, seventeen men organized themselves as the Palmyra Union Agricultural Society, and held a three days fair that October. From then until the present, successful annual fairs have been held on the extensive, well kept Fair Grounds on Jackson Street.




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[ Image: Jarvis Block. Erected 1876. ]






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[ Image: Culver Block. Erected 1870. ]






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The local banking business began with the Wayne County Bank of Palmyra, organized in 1830, with its president Angus Strong succeeded by Thomas Rogers, George Beckwith and Abram Spear and its cashier, Joseph S. Fenton. This bank built and occupied until its failure in 1840 the offices and residence where now is the First National Bank.

The Palmyra Savings Bank, incorporated in April, 1842, enjoyed a brief existence.

Lyman Lyon and S. B. Gavitt carried on a private banking business from December, 1865, until June, 1867, when Lyon bought Gavitt's interest to continue alone until his death, in August, 1887.

In 1866 H. P. Knowles & Co. opened a private banking business which still continues.

The Palmyra Bank, established by Pliny Sexton in 1844, did business in the east section of the present Story store. Later, George W. Cuyler opened the Cuyler Bank in the old offices of the Wayne County Bank. In April, 1853, these houses were associated and. in Mr. Cuyler's offices, continued as Cuyler's Bank of Palmyra with George W. Cuyler, president; Pliny Sexton, vice president, and Stephen P. Seymour, cashier. In 1864 this bank became the First National Bank with the following directors: George W. Cuyler, pres ident; Pliny Sexton, vice president; Pliny T. Sexton, cashier; William H. Cuyler, Charles McLouth and David S. Aldrich.




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[ Image: The First National Block. ]






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[ Image: Ganargua Mill. ]


"Easy conveyance for men and goods from place to place" is essential to the prosperity of any com munity. The early paths through the forests have be come highways -- the first, Canandaigua road in 1793. John Swift, with others, cleared Ganargua creek to its junction with the Canandaigua outlet, and in 1799 it was declared navigable water. This stream was the principal route until the opening of the Erie canal in 1825. The tumbled down collector's office on Canal street gives little idea of the business done by "Clinton's big ditch." From the day the Governor's boat greeted at every settlement -- officially opened the canal




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until the railroad usurped most of its traffic, the Erie canal was the great instrument in opening this new country. It carried freight and it carried people. When the packet approached a station a trumpet blared to set the town agog, the horses were put in a fast trot and with gusto drew the boat to the landing. The New York Central railroad came through in 1853, and the West Shore in 1884. Morris Huxley -- known to all as Dad Huxley -- drove the omnibus to the first train to stop here. For thirty-four years Dad's hearty greeting and 'bus welcomed all arrivals. The omnibus service to the stations has been discontinued since the advent in 1906 of the Rochester, Syracuse and Eastern electric road, for this trolley does nearly all the local passenger business.

[ Image: Mill Dam. ]






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[ Images: Erie Canal.
Sexton Warehouse on Erie Canal, Built by Franklin Lakey. ]







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Here Henry Wells Was Married.


Henry Wells, afterwards founder of Wells College, starting from Palmyra, carried parcels short distances in a hand bag. His business grew until it needed a horse and wagon. In 1845 was formed the firm of Wells & Co., one of the earliest express companies in the country. This, merged with others, became the American Express Co. Henry Wells married his first wife -- Sally Daggett -- in the little weather beaten house that stands opposite Stafford street on the north side of Main street.

On November 26, 1817, Timothy C. Strong sent out the Palmyra Register -- Democratic -- the first newspaper




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in what is now Wayne County. In 1823, after various changes of title, it was bought and continued as the Wayne County Sentinel by Pomeroy Tucker and Egbert P. Grandin. Up to its end in 1860 this sheet often changed editors, names and politics. It was on the press of the Wayne County Sentinel -- in 1830 -- that the first edition of the Mormon Bible was printed. John H. Gilbert did the type setting and press work. He kept a copy of the book in the original sheets, which is now owned by P. T. Sexton. The press used was recently sold to the Mormons by F. W. demons. Other newspapers enjoyed each its brief existence. Frederick Morley issued the Palmyra Courier in 1838 and continued its publication until 1851. In 1854 it was known as the Palmyra Democrat; but in August of that year the present editor, E. S. Averill, bought it and restored the original name. He brought it to the support of the Republican party, and added a novel feature -- a page devoted to local items.

In 1871 Anson B. Clemons and Frederick W. Clemons, his son, established the Wayne County Jour nal the first newspaper or printing house in the county to use steam power. The Journal is now edited by Frederick Foster for the Palmyra Printing Company.

A widefelt movement emanating from Palmyra is the Church of Latter Day Saints. In 1816 Joseph Smith, Sr., moved here from Vermont with his wife and nine children. For two years he kept a cake and




29


beer shop on lower Main street. Then he moved his family to a wild tract south of the village which, within this present year, the Mormons have bought as the well kept farm of William Avery Chapman. The Smiths were interested in things occult. With a "magic stone" they claimed to locate stolen articles and buried treasure, and to forecast the future. In the summer of 1827 Joseph Smith, Jr., claimed that he beheld a vision. The second was announced that fall while others fol lowed hard apace until Smith said he was directed to

[ Image: Mormon Hill. ]


find the golden plates. He went out at night and alone to return bearing a mysterious package which he said contained the treasure with the stones by which he could translate. These were found on Mormon Hill a Mecca for his disciples to this present day. Sidney Rigdon, Oliver Cowdery the amanuensis, and Martin Harris, who furnished the money for printing, were conspicuous in the incipient stages of the powerful




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[ Image: Farm of William Avery Chapmwn. Purchased by the Mormons of Utah. ]

hierarchy of Utah. In 1830 the Mormon Bible appeared. That June saw the organization of the Church of Latter Day Saints with, beside the Smith family, some thirty members drawn from this and neighboring communities. Sidney Rigdon, the first regular Mormon preacher, held a meeting in the rooms of the Palmyra Young Men's Association on the east corner of Main and Market streets. He was confronted by a small, unsympathetic audience. Late in the summer of 1830 Joseph Smith, Jr., and his followers left Palmyra for Kirtland, Ohio.




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The New England settlers of Palmyra could not be long without their school house. In 1793 two were built of logs -- the one on a site in the village given by John Swift; the other, the Hopkins school in East Pal myra. Much later the partisan spirit was rife and crept into educational matters to such an extent that two frame school houses were built -- the Federalist, taught by Blackman, and the Democratic, under Ira Selby. Before the site of the present Roman Catholic Church was graded down, on the crest of the hill stood the Palmyra Academy, a two story brick building that boasted the first bell in town.

[ Image: One of the Three District Schools. ]







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In 1835 the village was divided into three districts each with its stone school house. One stood on the west corner of Main and Carroll streets; another on the north side of Jackson, between Cuyler and Fayette streets; and the third on the east side of Throop street. The last teachers were: No. 1, John R. Vosburgh; No. 2, Henry J. Foster; No. 3, Charles H. Graham.

These three districts were united in 1846 as Union School No. 1 of Palmyra. March 19, 1847, an act au thorized the village to levy taxes for a lot and building. April 11 the school was incorporated. The present site was bought of the Samuel Beckwith estate for $2,500, and the "old school house," a square, three story brick edifice, was built. The first board of trustees was A. P. Crandall, Theron R. Strong and Pliny Sexton; R. G. Pardee was clerk. The first faculty was: Justus W. French, principal; William M. Crosby, A. M., and Sarah D. Hance, seniors; Charles D. Foster, juniors; Clarissa Northrup, juveniles; Edward M. French, Me linda C. Jones and A. Maria West, assistants; E. Lusk, instrumental music; C. D. Foster and J. C. French, vocal music; DeWitt Mclntyre, lecturer on physiol ogy. The Palmyra Union School in 1857 became the Palmyra Classical Union School with a board of nine trustees officered by Stephen Hyde, president; Joseph W. Corning, secretary, and Joseph C. Lovett, treasurer. The first building was used until 1889 when the present structure was built on the old lot. In 1905 a large study hall and other rooms were added.




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[ Image: Union School. ]


PRINCIPALS:

_____ Baldwin - 1857
C. M. Hutchinsm - 1857-62
John Dunlap - 1862-66
W. H. Fitts - 1866-68
C. M. Hutchins - 1868-75
Henry F. Curt - 1875-82
E. B. Fancher - 1882-86
A. S. Downing - 1886-87
H. G. Clark - 1887-90
George W. Pye - 1890-94
S. Dwight Arms - 1894-98
W. J. Deans - 1898-06
W. W. Bullock - 1906 -




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[ Image: Palmyra Classical Union School. ]







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[ The Public Library, Home of the Late Carlton H. Rogers. ]


The complement of the free school is the free libra ry. On the first day of November, 1899, the King's Daughters opened a public reading room. In September, 1901, a Library Association was formed with a five year charter from the state. The first gift of books was sixty volumes from the Patrons of Husbandry. In July, 1906, the Association received a perpetual charter, and now, 1907, the library numbers twenty-five hundred volumes.




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Palmyra pioneers had their school house in 1793, their first church building in the eastern part of the town -- in 1807.

The first meeting house in the village erected in 1811 on land given by General Swift for a Union

[ Grave of John Swift. ]


church -- was built almost entirely by the Presbyteri ans, who occupied it until 1832. This same building was used as a town hall. It was of wood, painted white with green blinds, and was burned in 1838. Around it, in true New England way, was the church yard -- now the "old cemetery." Here lie John Swift




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and Zebulon Williams with many another early comer. This was not the first burying ground in the town, for that was on the farm of Gideon Durfee, east of the village, recently purchased by Mr. Mitchell of Mrs. Hiram Clark. Here rests Gideon Durfee. In 1844 the

[ Image: First Burying Ground. ]


present cemetery was opened, while two years later a receiving vault was built. In 1886 the Rogers Memo rial Chapel was erected with a fund left by Carlton H. Rogers.

The Roman Catholic cemetery was consecrated during 1868.




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[ Image: Rogers Memorial Chapel. ]







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[ Image: Palmyra Cemetery, from the West Gate. ]


To-day Palmyra's churches number six: the Re formed Dutch on Cuyler street; the Roman Catholic on Church street; the Presbyterian, the Methodist, the Baptist, and the Episcopal on the four corners where Main street and Canandaigua with its continua tion Church street, intersect.

[ Image: The Four Churches. ]







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As has been stated, the purchase of Swift and Jen-kins included under the name of Palmyra the present Macedon, Palmyra, and East Palmyra. So the parish of the Presbyterian Church of Palmyra was this entire section. The Rev. Ira Condit organized a Congrega tional church in David H. Foster's house December 5, 1793. Later this church adopted the Presbyterian form of government and was connected with the Presbytery of Geneva until the formation of the Lyons Presbytery in 1857. The Presbyterian Church of Palmyra was incorporated the twenty-eighth day of September, 1797, the date given in the certificate of incorporation filed in the office of the Clerk of Ontario county. In this same document it is stated that the trustees were Jacob Gannett, David Warner, Jedediah Foster, Jonah How ell, Thomas Goldsmith and Stephen Reeves. From the formation of the church until 1817 the pastors preached alternate Sabbaths in the east and in the west ends of the township. Among the early ministers were Mr. Johnson in 1795; in 1800 Eleazor Fairbanks, followed by Mr. Lane; 1811-16, Hippocrates Rowe, who in 1812 occupied the only house on Canandaigua street; 1815, Stephen M. Wheelock, who went with the west ern part at the division.

In 1807 the first church building -- situated in the eastern part of the town -- was used, but it was not completed or dedicated until 1810. As has been said, the west end Presbyterians built a meeting house in 1811.




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In accordance with a request of the church, made February 13, 1817, the Presbytery divided the Church of Palmyra into the Presbyterian Church of East Pal myra, and the Western Presbyterian Church of Pal myra. The certificate of incorporation of this latter branch, recorded in Canandaigua the thirteenth of May, 1817, reads:

We hereby certify that on the eighteenth day of March, 1817, a number of male inhabitants residing within the limits of the Western Presbyterian Church in the town of Palmyra met pursuant to publick no tice, in the Meeting House in the Village of Palmyra, and agreed to be incorporated into a society to be known by the name of the Western Presbyterian Church and Society in the town of Palmyra, and proceeded to elect David White, Joel Foster, Henry Jes sup, Charles Bradish, James White, and Isaac Howell to serve as trustees of said society. In witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands and seals this 13th day of May, 1817.
                            Gain Robinson (seal)
                            Joel Foster (seal) Moderators of said Meeting.

The Rev. Francis Pomeroy assisted in the organization of this western branch. The present edifice was built in 1832 and dedicated in 1834.

On the wall of the church, near the pulpit, is a




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marble tablet sacred to the memory of Horace Eaton, D. D., pastor from 1849 to 1879:
"Fairer seems the ancient city, and the
Sunshine seems more fair,
That he once has trod its pavements,
That he once has breathed its air!"
Dr. Eaton lived in Palmyra until his death on the twenty-first of October, 1883.

At a memorial service the Honorable Henry R. Durfee said in part:

"When the elders of Epheseus went down to Mile tus for what proved to be their farewell interview with Paul, 'they all wept sore... sorrowing most of all for the words that he spake, that they should see his face no more.'

"It was their sense of personal loss that filled their eyes with tears as they realized that the loving pres ence of their friend and teacher would shortly disappear from their sight forever.

"And so it is with us as we gather here to make some expression of our grief at the loss of our friend and teacher. It is our loss that we lament to-day. For him to die is gain. In this assemblage it is not so much the man of mark, of wide influence, of high at tainments, fitted worthily to bear the title of 'doctor of divinity,' as our friend endeared to us by long acquaintance and companionship, that we mourn. And I think that the personal qualities and traits which at tracted us and gained him our affection are at this time




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uppermost in our minds. In recalling the personal characteristics of our dear friend and pastor, it has seemed to me that one of the most marked was his constant and abounding cheerfulness. This arose, not from cynical indifference, or stoical fortitude for none was more sympathetic, compassionate and tender hearted than he -- but from the depth and serenity of his faith.

"Another characteristic was his keen perception and love of the sublime and beautiful. His was the true poetic soul, to which 'a thing of beauty is a joy forever.' Whether he listened to the giant harp of the wind swept woods, the 'breezy call of incense-breathing morn,' the songs of the birds, the pealing thunder, or the deep diapason of the sea, his ear was attuned to all their harmonies. He recognized with reverent delight the voice of the Great Creator in every harmony of the wind or wave, and His creative hand in every perfect form or tint of earth or sky. And as in Nature, so also in literature and art, whatever was grand or beautiful found in him an enthusiastic and appreciative admirer.

Nor was this refined, aesthetic taste and perception at all allied to weakness. On the contrary, he had in his character not a little of the granite of his native hills. No war of elements or opinions, and no obstacles natural or conventional, could deter him from vigorously and valiantly following the path in which he believed his duty called him.




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To the preaching of the Word, also, he brought a like courage and vigor, and robustness of understand ing. He was not afraid to grapple with the great problems of the life that now is, and that which is to come, and with the profound truths of the Scripture; and he brought to their consideration a grasp of mind, and an intentness and clearness of thought which was most truly edifying to thoughtful minds. And yet I think he loved especially to dwell upon the divine ten derness and compassion, and to entreat us by the mercies of God to be reconciled to Him.

"Well may we sorrow that we shall see his face no more. Yet his teachings and his life shall not fail from our memory. These shall rest upon and remain with us like a benediction, and an inspiration also, leading each of us with sweet persuasion to a nobler, purer, and higher life."

Nineteen sons of the Western Presbyterian Church have studied for the ministry. Among them were John Eaton, son of Dr. Eaton, who died before completing his course; Warner Bradley Riggs, who in October, 1876, went as a home missionary to Texas, where he organized the Brenham Church, and was pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church of Dallas from 1885 until his death in March, 1905, and Charles Foster Kent, Ph. D., Woolsey Professor of Biblical Literature in Yale University. There have gone out as foreign missionaries, Martha Lovell, Maria West and Sarah West, to Constantinople; and Cora Stone to Japan.




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[ Images: Homer Satrac and Anna R. Eaton. ]

"The path of the just is as the shining light, that shineth more
and more unto the perfect day."
PROV. 4:18.
"Friends my soul with joy remembers!
How like quivering flames they start,
When I fan the living embers
On the hearthstone of my heart!"

                        -- LONGFELLOW.




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[ Image: Western Presbyterian Church. ]







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PASTORS OF THE WESTERN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.

Stephen M. Wheelock, April, 1817.
Jesse Townsend, August, 1817.
Daniel C. Hopkins, stated supply, January, 1822.
Benjamin B. Stockton, February, 1824.
Stephen Porter, stated supply, October, 1827.
Alfred D. Campbell, November, 1828.
Samuel W. Whepley, September, 1831.
George R. H. Shumway, December, 1834.
Nathaniel W. Fisher, 1840.
_________ Goetner, D. D., stated supply, 1848.
Horace Eaton, D. D., February, 1849.
Warren H. Landon, D. D., December, 1879.
Herbert D. Cone, October, 1887.
Stephen G. Hopkins, April, 1890.
Angus Hugh Cameron, February, 1897.
Peter McKenzie, May, 1904.




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The First Baptist Church of Palmyra was organized at the home of Lemuel Spear, May 29, 1800, with nineteen members. In 1808 a frame meeting house was built on the west side of the Walworth road just north of where it is crossed by the Macedon road. November 9, 1832, a Baptist church was instituted in the village -- at the home of Rev. John D. Heart -- but after a year was received into the older church. In, accord with an agreement made when these societies joined, the pastor preached alternate Sundays in his church and in the Palmyra Academy. A final separation came in February, 1835, when the older society as the First Baptist Church of Macedon retained the property, while the younger moved to the village as the First Baptist Church of Palmyra. The seventy- eight members of this latter branch elected for deacons R. C. Jackson, William Parke and E. R. Spear; for trustees, R. C. Jackson, William Rogers and Stephen Spear. Services were held in the meeting house on burial hill until it was burned in 1838; then in Will iamson Hall until the old stone church was dedicated January 28, 1841. This was torn down in 1870 to give place for the present brick structure which was dedi cated March 29, 1871. This church sent Mrs. Jane Mason Haswell to Burmah where she labored as a missionary from 1835 to 1884. It has given four ministers, Thomas Rogers, C. B. Crane, Charles Shear and Albert Clark.




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[ Image: Baptist Church. ]







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PASTORS OF THE BAPTIST CHURCH.

H. V. Jones, April, 1835.
W. I. Crane, April, 1837.
A. H. Stowell, December, 1839.
S. Wilson, supply, December, 1840.
A. H. Burlingham, April, 1841.
W. B. Douglass, supply, November, 1842.
D. Harrington, June, 1843.
O. W. Gates, April, 1852.
William R. Webb, July, 1853.
Warham Mudge, February, 1857.
S. Adsit, October, 1862.
C. N. Pattengill, July, 1867.
Hardin Wheat, January, 1874.
Addison Parker, October, 1876.
J. Cyrus Thorns, September, 1881.
J. R. Henderson, November, 1885.
F. H. Adams, June, 1897.
O. H. Hubbard, D. D., November, 1903.




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It is impossible to learn when Methodism was first preached in Palmyra; but the first class, formed in 1811 and connected with the Ontario circuit, Geneva conference, may be considered the beginning of the First Methodist Episcopal Church of Palmyra. These early followers of Wesley met in school house, barn, or grove until 1822, when they legally organized them selves into a society and built a church near the corner of Vienna and Johnson streets, just north of the cem etery. Here they worshipped until 1847 when the house was removed to Cuyler street, remodelled and used until the dedication of the present brick building, October 31, 1867.

Albert A. Allen and Charles D. Purdy represent this church in the ministry.




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PASTORS OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH

_______ Wooster,
Gideon Osborne,
_______ Tomkinson,
Wilson Osborne,
Preston Parker,
Ralph Bennett,
Z. J. Buck,
_______ Hall,
Alpha Wright,
John Mandeville,
_______ Crozier,
William Mandeville,
J. Pearsall,
L. D. Paddock,
B. McLouth, 1847.
Ransley Harrington.
Thomas Tousey, 1863.
H. P. Jervis.
________ Hickok,
Peter McKinstry.
________ Baker.
Thomas Tousey.
C. S. Fox.
Robert Hogoboom.
J. Kellogg, 1869.
J. Alabaster, 1870.
J. P. Farmer, 1872.
B. H. Brown, 1873.
C. W. Winchester, 1876.
R. D. Munger, 1879.
J. V. Benham, 1881.
G. P. Avery, 1884.
T. M. House, 1885.
A. W. Broadway, 1886.
E. B. Gearheart, 1888.
H. C. Moyer, 1891.
J. H. Rogers, 1893.
S. F. Sanford, 1894.
W. S. H. Hermans, 1897.
W. H. Giles, 1898.
Ezra Tinker, 1901.
Edward J. Brooker, 1903.




53


[ Image: Methodist Episcopal Church. ]







54


Doubtless the first local services of the Episcopal Church were held by the missionary Davenport Phelps. On June 23, 1823, Zion Episcopal Church came into being under the ministry of the Rev. Rufus Murray. Joseph Colt and Benjamin Billings were the first wardens of the parish. Service was held in the Academy until February 1, 1829, when the Right Rev erend Bishop Hobart consecrated the first building. This was of wood and stood on the present site. In July, 1873, the Right Reverend Bishop Coxe conse crated the present beautiful sandstone structure. The entire spire was given by George W. Cuyler, a memo rial for his children. Miss Amy Chapman went out from this church as a missionary to the Freedmen. Rev. James H. Herendeen, rector of St. John's Church, Medina, entered the ministry from Zion Church. Right Reverend William Paret, D. D., LL. D., in 1885 con secrated Bishop of Maryland, lived in Palmyra and studied with the Right Reverend George D. Gillespie, Bishop of Western Michigan, when he was rector of Zion Church.




55


[ Image: The First Zion Episcopal Church. ]


RECTORS OF ZION EPISCOPAL CHURCH.

Rufus Murray.
John A. Clark.
Ezekiel G. Geer.
John W. Guion.
Burton H. Hickox.
Jesse Pond.
William Stanton.
John D. Gilbert.
Clement M. Butler.
T. L. Brittain.
John W. Clark.
Amos B. Beach.
George D. Gillespie.
Christopher T. Leffingwell.
John Leach.
John G. Webster.
Charles T. Coerr.
Leonard Woods Richardson.
Charles T. Walkley.
Emory S. Towson




56


[Image: The Present Zion Episcopal Church. ]


PASTORS OF ST. ANN'S ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH.

John Twohay, July, 1850.
Michael Gubride, Nov., 1852.
James Donelly, 1854.
Thomas Walsh, July, 1854.
William Casey, Aug., 1855.
James E. Hartley, May, 1893.
The first mass was said in Palmyra by Father O'Reilly of Rochester. St. Ann's Roman Catholic Church was organized in 1849 by Rev. Edmund O'Con nor of Canandaigua, who had for some time said an occasional mass in Williamson hall. In 1848 or '49 William F. Aldrich sold the old Academy to the Ro manists, who used it as a church until 1861 when Bishop Timon blessed the present structure, and the congregation occupied it though unfinished. It was completed, and consecrated by the Right Reverend Bernard McQuaid on October 23, 1870. During 1903 the congregation added a belfry and vestibule, while in October of that year a bell was hung the gift of Mrs Mary Darmody. The parish has given two can didates to the ministry -- Thomas M. Moore and Fran cis Goggin, D. D., professor in St. Bernard's Sem inary, Rochester.




58


[ Image: St. Ann's Roman Catholic Church. ]







59


[ The Reformed Dutch Church, Formerly the Methodist Church. ]


The Reformed Dutch Church of Palmyra, the out growth of a mission, was organized August 15, 1887, with thirty-four members. Service was held in the Presbyterian Church until March, 1890, when the old Methodist Church on Cuyler Street was purchased of P. T. Sexton.

PASTORS OF THE REFORMED DUTCH CHURCH.

W. G. Bass, March, 1888.
Wietze Lubach, 1890.
G. Flikkema.
J. Meulendyke.




60


Palmyra glories in her war record. Her founders were many of them Revolutionary veterans, while there are recorded the names of forty-three who fought in 1812. In this second war with England, General John Swift, a tried Revolutionary soldier, was on the Niagara frontier. At Queenston Heights he led a charge against Fort George and captured a picket post with some sixty men whom he did not disarm. One of the prisoners asked: "Who is General Swift?" "I am General Swift," he answered. The miscreant fired and mortally wounded the gallant commander. Gen eral Swift was buried where he died, July 12, 1814, but was removed by his fellow citizens to Palmyra. The legislature presented his son with a sword as an acknowledgment of the father's patriotic services; and hung a portrait of the General in New York City Hall.

The Civil War found Palmyra ready. Colonel Joseph W. Corning came home from the legislature to raise a company -- Company B, 33rd Regiment of Infantry. On May 16, 1861, this company marched to the front with Joseph W. Corning, captain; G. T. White, lieutenant; H. J. Draime, ensign.

In 1862 Captain Seneca B. Smith, Lieutenant S. B. Mclntyre and Lieutenant A. P. Seeley took out company A, 111th Infantry -- raised almost entirely in Palmyra.

When Company B was mustered out in 1863 Henry J. Draime wished to re-enlist. He set about




61


raising a Veteran Cavalry company which he filled largely in Palmyra and led to the fighting line in No vember.

All told, four hundred and forty-two men of Pal myra fought for the union. Unfortunately, better fortunately, the list is too long to name each and every gallant soldier. In the Village Hall are two marble tablets inscribed with the names of those soldiers who died during the war.

The soldiers and sailors met January 15, 1881. and organized as the John H. Starin Post, G. A. R., which became the James A. Garfield Post in September of that year. The first officers were: John G. Webster, C.; Colonel A. P. Seeley, S. V. C.; Murganzy Hopkins, J. V. C.; William I. Reid, O. of D.; William W. Williamson, Q. M.; I. C. G. Crandall, Chap.; John Pitkin, Surg.; William S. Gilbert, O. of G.; Colonel George McGown, Adj.; John Allis, S. M.; James B. Beckwith, Q. M. S. To-day the officers are: Major H. P. Knowles, C.; Colonel F. W. demons, S. V. C.; James West, J. V. C.; M. V. B. Randolph, Adj.; Colo nel A. P. Seeley, Surg.; Joseph Benedict, Q. M.; L. H. Essex, Chap.; Howard Campbell, O. of G.; Jacob Zeigler, O. of D.

In connection with the Civil War it may be said that the house of the late Pliny Sexton on Main Street was a regular station of the Underground Railway; and that Dr. Eaton helped many fugitive slaves. The




62


Doctor's study was in the belfry of the Presbyterian Church, just under the clock. One morning a number of fugitives were consulting with the Doctor about reaching the lake shore and crossing to Canada. Of a sudden the most terrific clanging brought them terror

[ Image: Home of the Late Pliny Sexton, A Station of the Underground Railway. ]


stricken to their knees. They besought their supposed benefactor not to give them up to their master; they prayed the Lord to be merciful. After twelve re sounding strokes all was still. The clock had struck the noon.




63


The Spanish-American War drew its quota from Palmyra. William Thomas Sampson was born here February 9, 1840. In 1857 he entered the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis from which he was graduated at the head of the class of 1861.

Sampson served afloat and ashore during the Civil War, and through the long peace from '65 to '98. He was given command of the North Atlantic Squad ron in the spring of 1898. He arrived off Santiago the first day of June and assumed command of the Flying Squadron with his own. Then began the blockade of Santiago harbor which continued until the third of July when Rear Admiral Sampson annihilated the Spanish fleet under Cevera.

October 26, 1899, William T. Sampson, tired and worn, came home to receive the warmest welcome the town could give, for Palmyra delighted to do him honor.

Admiral Sampson died in Washington, D. C., May 6, 1902, and lies buried in the National Cemetery at Arlington. On Sunday, May 11, his friends in Palmyra gathered in the Presbyterian Church for a memo rial service.

The national government gave Palmyra a gun taken from the Spanish Almirante Oquendo, destroyed at Santiago. The cannon was placed in a conspicuous place on Main street, and on Memorial Day, 1903, was dedicated to the memory of Rear Admiral Sampson.




64


[ Image: William T.Sampson. ]


"Death makes no conquest of this conqueror,
For now he lives in fame, tho' not in life"

                  -- SHAKESPEARE.




65

At the dedicatory, services Hon. Pliny T. Sexton delivered the following address:

"To the philanthropist war is unspeakably horri ble and hateful, and its instruments of destruction are hideous. Yet, the grass grows greener and the flowers take on brighter hues in the fields whereon warring human beings have shed each others blood. And the philosopher, taught by the lessons of history, and gifted with prophetic vision, easily perceives that war has been, and yet must be, a necessary agency in secur ing and preserving for mankind the inestimable bless ings of liberty and peace.

"Redeemed by such usefulness, and idealized by such associations, the instruments of warfare lose their repulsiveness, and even come to be admired as justified means to justified ends. And to-day, as we are halted here for our brief dedicatory services by the side of this great cannon, we are thinking little of its terrible destroying power; but are regarding it rather as a comforting reminder of our beloved de parted son and brother, the illustrious Admiral Samp son, whose faithfulness, valor, and genius organized the marvelous naval victory which, at Santiago, wrest ed this gun from the control of the supporters of a de testable despotism and crushing tyranny which had long dominated some of the fairest lands of earth and ruthlessly oppressed millions of people.

"It was eminently fitting that the nation should give this notable gun to the village of Palmyra the




66


birthplace of Admiral Sampson. The nation had kept from us his sacred dust, which we fain would have brought home to water with our tears and guard dur ing the years. It surely could not well do less than to place here, as it has done, on this greensward, along this village street once so familiar to our brother's feet -- this speaking signal of the last great and crowning achievement of his life.

"Concerning that glorious event, it is not permitted me now to enlarge; nor may I detail his fruitful career since the going forth from our peaceful village, nearly half a century ago, of the even then "wonderful Samp son boy" to consecrate himself to the service of his country. For this occasion it must suffice to say that with never abating zeal, from youth until death, all the great powers with which his Maker had endowed him, and all which the most sedulous cultivation de veloped in him, were unsparingly devoted to safe guarding and advancing the welfare and glory of his native land. He knew no greater or sweeter duty than serving his country; and permitted himself neither rest nor indulgence when that duty called. Faithfulness was the keystone of his character; excelsior his motto; and manifold and splendid were his achieve ments.

"That it may not be thought that I have summarized with extravagance, or have been unduly biased by my love for the friend of all my life, let me add the




67


testimony of witnesses who can be in no wise impeached.

"Speaking of Admiral Sampson as a student at the Naval Academy, Admiral Philip, who was his classmate, has said:

"'No matter what the subject of study was mathematics, French, moral science, or seamanship Sampson, with invariable regularity, had the perfect marking in his class.... He was graduated number one.

"Of him later, as Superintendent of the Naval Academy, whose conditions and methods he greatly improved, Mr. Park Benjamin in his history of the Naval Academy, says:

"'When Commander Sampson's tour of duty at the Naval Academy ended, there remained little for any one else to do, save to keep the standard of efficiency unimpaired.'

"In the final mortuary record made of him in Ap pleton's Encyclopedia, referring to his comprehensive connection with the North Atlantic Squadron, whose almost unparalleled victory in the naval battle of Santiago won for the United States Navy imperishable renown, it is said: 'It was Sampson who designed and built the guns; designed and built the projectiles; designed and built the armor; placed the batteries upon the ships and superintended their construction; aided in the preparation of the drill book; drilled the




68


crews and officers; and finally took command of the fleet and fought it through a successful war.'

"If national gratitude were something unknown, as it is not; yet for very selfishness alone, nations must still preserve the memories of such public serv ants. All motives move thereto. And gladly may we realize and agree that properly this memorial gun has been given to us of Palmyra not simply to minister to our gratitude, but also, and more, that its presence here shall through generation after generation, awaken our local pride and affection the more often to recount the inspiring story of the immeasurably valuable life of Admiral Sampson. And so, with such impelling, and with all impelling, and with a depth of personal affectionate feeling which those not of Palmyra and not of Sampson's generation may not fully under stand, we do now by these simple services gratefully accept and lovingly dedicate this enduring trophy gun to the perpetuation of the memory of Admiral William Thomas Sampson. And, with the nation and for the nation, we do also dedicate all of the inspirations of his blessed memory, even as he dedicated his whole life to the continuing service of his beloved country."




69ff


[ Images of various Palmyra Homes. ]















Palmyra  and  Vicinity

WRITTEN  BY

THOMAS  L.  COOK















1930
Press of the Palmyra Courier-Journal
Palmyra, N. Y.



Note: The text of this book is in the public domain.
No US copyright is stated nor implied.


[ 11 ]



PALMYRA  AND  VICINITY

At the close of the Revolutionary War there was agriculture and commerce, but no manufacturing by which to give employment; consequently farming was the only occupation open to the young men of ambition and enterprise.

After returning from the war they began to look around for an occupation suitable to them for their life work, but as there was nothing much to choose from but farming, they began to look around for a choice in location. Those who had been up in the northern part of New Hampshire were very much pleased with the Connecticut Valley. A good many young men married and settled in that part of the country. When their children grew up they heard of the good opportunities in northern New York, around Potsdam and Parishville in St. Lawrence County. The latter township was nearly all settled by people from Grafton County, New Hampshire. Other soldiers, after returning from the war, who had been in the western part of the country, thought very favorably of the Genesee country which at that time included nearly all western New York, and among the very earliest settlers of this country was General John Swift and his brother Philetus. After the close of the Revolutionary War they removed to a disputed territory in Pennsylvania. General Swift had a commission and was at the battle of Wyoming and was also engaged in the Pennemite War where he set fire to a Pennemite block house and received a shot in his neck. After the massacre of Wyoming a remnant of the settlers resolved to seek another home.

John Swift and John Jenkins were appointed agents to select and purchase land for their occupation. John Jenkins had been employed by Phelps and Gorham as a surveyor and was acquainted with the Genesee country. In 1789 they purchased the township of land known as Wayne County in which are the towns of Macedon and Palmyra.

Swift made the first settlement, built and occupied the first trading house where now stands the village of Palmyra, then called Swift's Landing, at the mouth of Mill Brook, now just north of the Barge Canal on Railroad Avenue. Jenkins built a tavern under the brow of the hill on the bank of the creek about two miles below Palmyra village.

His party consisted of four men, Harris, Earl, Baker and Rawson. Near the cabin was the hunting camp of Tuscarora Indians to whom provisions upon several occasions, had been given. Early one morning the Indians crept up to the cabin, put their guns through between the unchinked logs, chose their mark and fired. Baker was killed, Earl was wounded and the others were unharmed.

Jenkins and Rawson each seized an ax as they sprang from their blankets and met the Indians as they rushed from the hut and eventually




12


drove them into the woods where they were lost to sight. In the melee Jenkins and Rawson managed to wrest two rifles and a tomahawk from their assailants.

At daylight Jenkins and Rawson, after burying the body of Baker, set out with Earl, the wounded man, to seek assistance and spread the alarm of a possible Indian uprising. After traveling the better part of a day through the woods, the party reached a small collection of log huts on the site of the present Geneva, where a possee was organized to search for the troublesome Indians.

Since the close of the Revolutionary War the American government had sought to make agreeable settlements with the Western New York Indians, who, claiming they were so bound by treaties, had mostly sided with the British in the struggle. Colonel John Butler's Tory Rangers, an organization of British sympathizers from the Mohawk and Susquehanna settlements, that with their Indian allies had strewn death and destruction through the backwoods settlements of New York and Pennsylvania during the war, still made their headquarters at Fort Niagara, which was not given up by the British until 1796, following an agreement over the New York and Upper Canada boundary line.

The Rangers were not hesitating, either, to keep the Indians stirred up over the steady westward advance of settlers from the eastern states and the Hudson River valley settlements into the fertile wilderness of the Genesee country that returning soldiers were so enthusiastic over.

Nevertheless it seemed it was partly hunger that led the four half­starved Tuscaroras to attack Major Jenkins and his party of survivors that March night, for when the men returned from Geneva with the possee bent upon searching out the Indians responsible for Baker's death, they discovered that the Indians had been there before them and rifled the camp of the small store of flour and pork and other provisions.

Taking up the trail of the Indians, who had recently left the hut, laden with plunder, the Geneva party followed it southward for several days and at last came upon two Tuscaroras in the woods near the Indian trading post called Newtown, on the Chemung river, six miles south of the present Elmira. The surveyors who had accompanied the Geneva possee, declared that these Indians were with the party that had attacked them in the darkness at their cabin.

With Johnstown, the nearest jail, many days march to the east, and with consequent small chance of getting the prisoners there, and with the trails still watched by patrols of Butler's Rangers, it was decided to give the Indians a trial by jury then and there and dispose of them likewise.

The verdict of the court was "Guilty." The prisoners were sentenced to death. Horatio Jones and Jasper Parrish, two Geneva residents employed by the United States as interpreters in dealing with Indians, were present at the trial. The prisoners were blindfolded, led into the woods and each dispatched with a blow on the head from the tomahawk captured by Jenkins and Rawson when the camp was attacked.

The barbarity of this act, the aceounts of the execution state, were




13


excused by the exigencies of the times. Electrocution as a means of capital punishment was then unknown. There was no rope handy that day on the wooded banks of the Chemung River. The executioners fell back upon the old English custom of putting a man out of misery with an ax. Having no broad ax with them the men of the law substituted the primitive Indian weapon, the "tomahawk."

All this end of the state was then called Montgomery County, which included all New York State west of a line drawn through Schoharie, north and south.

The news of this attack resulted in the abandonrnent of the Susque­hanna movement and Swift went to Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island where he labored to induce immigration. When Swift and Jenkins bought this township, range 2, they at once began to survey off farm lots along Mud Creek.

The second settler in Palmyra was Webb Harwood and with him came David White. His death and funeral was the first in Palmyra. Harwood died in 1824. Lemuel Spear is given as the third settler. The land he purchased at that time he paid 20 cents an acre for. Mr. Spear lived in his wagon until he could build a log house. He was from Massachusetts and had served in the Revolutionary War. Mr. Spear had purchased from Isaac Hathaway, land, paying for the same 20 cents an acre and on this tract settled a mile west of Palmyra village. He moved his family during the month of February, 1790. He came on with two yoke of cattle, some cows and a number of sheep. He found his way by blazed trees from Vienna to his purchase and his sled ran roughly upon little less than a track. The weather was mild and the stock fared well upon the growth of the fiats, a portion of which had been known as Indian Village. The family, eleven in number, passed several months in a covered sleigh and rough hut until, having cleared and planted a few acres, they had time to build a log house. They brought with them provisions sufficient for a year and either killep. as they needed for meat or traded with the Indians for a supply of venison, and when the few acres had been harvested they got along passibly well. Shortly after the Spears had settled, Ebenezer, a son, made a journey on foot to Schenectady to purchase some wine for Mrs. Harwood, who was ill. He was fourteen days on the way, carried his food in a knapsack and slept under shelter but four of the thirteen nights. The incident illustrates the true neighborly feeling then proverbially present. He died in 1809. His last surviving children were Ebenezer, Abram and Stephen. The latter kept the homestead.

Ebenezer speaks as follows concerning current events: Our first boards came from Granger's saw mill on Flint Creek. Several years after we came in, Captain Porter built the first farm barn, and my father, the next one. I burned the first lime kiln west of Seneca Lake for General Nathaniel Taylor of Canandaigua.

In 1794-5 Abraham and Jacob Smith built a mill in Farmington on the Ganargua Creek, previous to which we used to go to the Friends' Mill in Jerusalem (now Penn Yan).




14


The first corn carried to mill from Palmyra was by Noah Porter. He went to Jerusalem with an ox team in 1790, taking ten days in going and coming. His return was hailed with great joy, for pounding corn was hard work. Our coffee was made of burnt corn; our tea of hemlock and other bark and for chocolate, dried evans root was frequently used. Burnt corn cobs were used for saleratus in cooking.

It was well for the pioneers that they had been brought up in the school of experience and knew how to avail themselves of the most scanty resources. Sometimes the supply of flour would be nearly exhausted. The corn was ground in a hand mill. In the woods was plenty of game. The streams were full of fish. The pioneers could not bring any household goods with them, therefore they brought only things most needed, many times living in the wagon until a log house could be built with no nails, with bark roof and stick chimney plastered on the inside with blue clay, wooden hinges with wooden latches for the door, using a splint broom instead of one made of broomcorn. They also brought appleseeds to plant and start an orchard. Some of the old trees can be seen today in the country; and have grown to be very large. The fruit was nearly all natural fruit. They also brought gourd seeds to plant so as to grow their own dippers. An eavestrough was made out of elm bark that conveyed the rain water to a trough made from a basswood log. This was their cistern for rain water.

Their farming tools were very crude, perhaps the plow would have wooden mould boards, or they might have a wrought iron plow called the "bull plow." When the point became dull it was taken to the blacksmith's to be sharpened. A drag was made from a tree crotch, the teeth were large and most always dull.

Too much praise cannot be given to the women who had bade farewell to kin and kindred to venture a residence in an unbroken wilderness to make their home far from neighbors, waiting for other settlers to come in and share with them. But with undaunted courage and visions of a brighter day they pressed on to reach the goal.

The amber smoke that curled from the stick chimney and floated skyward told the story that the foundation had been laid for civilization and prosperity.

Mud Creek almost from the start became a navigable stream as far west as Macedon, and was for a time the Mississippi of this country. It has been claimed by some that Swift's Landing was at the forks of Red Creek near the Central depot, while others say at the mouth of Mill Brook, which would be near the Barge Canal. This is where Milford Galloway told me it was. He said his father, Thomas Galloway, who was one of the old pioneers, told him so.

This little settlement was known for miles around as Swift's Landing. Sawmills and blacksmith shops were built, and the settlers who came later could build their log houses with brick chimneys instead of sticks and blue clay, and with shingle roof instead of bark. Nails made by the blacksmith had to be sparingly used. A log store was put up on the site




15


of the New York Central depot by Zebulon Williams who kept supplies suitable for the times, and they could sell their wheat to Mr. Williams for 35 cents per bushel.

But the time at last came when the town was to be called Tolland instead of Swift's, Landing. But this name was not pleasing to the citizens. In 1797 between March and June a meeting was held to fix upon one of the names that should be suggested. Daniel Sawyer, the brother of Mrs. Swift, was then for two reasons in a literary mood. First, he was engaged to Miss Dosha Boughton, the first school mistress. Second, he had been reading ancient history. Doubtless thinking that as ancient Palmyra had a Zenobia, so his modern heroine should have a Palmyra. It is not strange that he should urge this name with felicity and success. It was adopted with acclamation and the name of Swift's Landing, and Tolland, henceforth are to slumber on the pages of history.

The trials and privations of the early pioneers were many. Sickness and death were not of rare occurrence. The forms of disease and accident were numerous. Scarcely had the log hut in the clearing betoken occupa­tion, ere a lonely grave bore silent witness of human destiny. There was often lack of care on account of small quarters. The neighbors were kind and tender to the bereaved and hastened to give all assistance in their power.

But as the country became cleared and the health of the pioneers began to improve, everything began to look brighter.

But with all these hardships there was a charm in those old log cabins that lingered in the hearts of those old pioneers, and the story of the old log cabin days and pioneer life in after years they loved to relate.

With the women, the hum of the wheel and the beat of the loom, was music to their ear. To them it was pastime to convey the yarn from the spindle to the reel. And the bright prospects of the future was their happy dream.

The husbands' horny hands betokened hard labor. He smiles as he watches the rank wheat nodding in the wind, or the tall corn spreading out to shade the rich alluvial soil.

The year of 1811 finds Palmyra village with stores, shops and other enterprises to accommodate the people.

But a war cloud is rising in the East that is threatening the pioneers' home. The demands of England, our government cannot accept, and war is declared and the old flint lock musket is once more called upon for protection.

The new settlers had hardly gotten upon their feet when they were called upon in defense of their country. Some went to Niagara, Pultneyville and Sackets Harbor. The farms and all business had to be left to the women and a few men who stayed at home and looked after things as best they could.

With the assistance of neighbors the families raised a good many crops, which they harvested.




16


Economy was again their watchword. Care and anxiety pressed heavily upon the wives and mothers at home.

On February 16, 1814, glad tidings came to the heavy hearted. A treaty had been ratified by the Senate. Peace was declared and the War of 1812 was at an end. The news was received with great rejoicing.

In this war General John Swift was made brevert General. Once more the hearts of the pioneers ware saddened, when in 1814 while at Queenstown Heights, led by a party to Fort George, were he captured a picket post, and some sixty men. An oversight permitted the prisoners to retain their guns, and when one asked of them: "Who is General Swift?" he answered, "I am General Swift," and in an instant a shot was fired, and General John Swift received a fatal wound. The late Dr. Alexander McIntyre was standing by his side and he fell into his arms. He was taken to the nearest house and there died.

He was buried July 12, 1814. When the war was over the citizens of Palmyra exhumed his remains and they were buried in the old cemetery on Church Street in this village. His age was fifty-two years and twenty-five days.

The New York Legislature, out of respect to his patriotism and bravery, presented a sword to his oldest son and dedicated a full length portrait of General Swift to be hung up in the city hall, New York.

And here, too, another one of the first sacrifices to the War of 1812, was from this place. Major William Howe Cuyler was the first lawyer that opened an office in Palmyra, a man still remembered for his public enterprise. He was the aide of General Hall. On the night of the 8th of October, 1812, he was killed at Black Rock by a four-pound ball from the British battery at Fort Erie. The ball that passed through his body came into the possession of his son, William Howe Cuyler of this village.

In 1791 Swift built an ashery on the bank of the brook on the south side of East Main Street, where in 1800 a man by the name of Wilson built a tannery on the same site of the ashery. That same year Henry Jessup came from Southampton, Long Island, to Palmyra, and located permanently in 1806. Shortly after, he entered into partnership with Mr. Wilson in the tanning and curing business. After a short time he purchased Mr. Wilson's interest and for a time operated the business alone.

Several years later another ashery was built on the north side of the canal of which more will be said as we advance in our journey.

Benjamin Palmer, father of George Palmer, immigrated to Palmyra in 1796, where he died shortly after, leaving his family with small means, to struggle with the hardships incident to life at that period in such a wilderness as was western New York. The toils and privations of boyhood served to nurture the qualities of self-reliance, endurance and daring. The means of acquiring scholastic education, as now understood, were not accessible to him, and the limited attainments of his life in this direction were the fruits of unaided efforts in hours snatched from the repose which labor served to demand. He learned his trade as a tanner of Mr. Munson




17


of East Bloomfield, Ontario County, and after working for Mr. Henry Jessup at Palmyra for two years, formed a partnership with him in 1814, which continued successfully and mutually satisfactory until 1828. In 1817, March 24, Mr. Palmer married Miss Harriett Foster of Palmyra, and commenced housekeeping in a gambrel-roof house on Vienna Street, just east of Johnson Street.

After being in company with Mr. Jessup for fourteen years, which had proved to be a financial success, the field at Palmyra had become too limited for the expansive views of Mr. Palmer, and after an examination of the advantages presented by Rochester and other promising points, he selected Buffalo as his future home. Selling out his interest to Mr. Jessup and taking the money he had made in the tanning business in Palmyra, he moved to Buffalo in 1828.

He erected a large tannery and carried on a large business. He also became interested in various other enterprises that proved very profitable and with his keen judgment he became wealthy. Years afterwards his name was good for thousands, when he was conducting large operations, and controlling vast public trusts, and his name was highly respected at home and abroad. Mr. Palmer was very much devoted to the church to which he belonged. In 1857, he built a beautiful structure on Delaware Street, known as Calvary church, at a cost of eighty thousand dollars, and the whole was conveyed July 7, 1862, to the society now occupying it. Mr. Palmer died September 19, 1864.

The firm of Jessup and Palmer carried on a large business in tanning, curing, buying hides, selling leather and shoemaking. The tannery was located on the same site of the Galloway malt house. At that time they had 127 vats that were all out doors and called by the men, "The outdoor tan yard." The double house at the west end of the malt house was the hide house. The firm employed 16 apprentices and as many journeymen, besides farm hands and teams. As many as 35 or 40 of these men lodged in the garret of the old vinegar factory at the west (then the shoe factory). This was called by the men "the sky parlor." All boarded with Mr. Palmer.

Vienna Street on which Mr. Palmer lived was laid out in 1805, and at the time he lived here there were only 4 or 5 houses between his house and the grist mill on the ea.st end of Vienna Street, which was then called Hen Peck. The west end was called Aarondale iIi honor of Aaron Bristee, the only colored man in town with a family. In 1818 Mr. Palmer built the first barn on the street. General Rogers being at the raising of the barn, took charge of the ceremonies, naming the building by breaking a bottle and calling out, "The chief depository of Aarondale." At the shoe factory the firm employed a good many men making boots and shoes. This old building was afterwards used for a steam grist mill and was run by George Jessup.

In the 70's Mr. Taylor bought the property and enlarged the building and had a vinegar factory for a good many years, then later a malt house. Now it is owned by C. A. Sessions and has been for several years.

In 1832 the vat system at the old tannery was done away with when




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a brick structure was built and the work was all done under cover. This improvement vias made four years after Mr. Palmer had withdrawn from the firm. After carrying on the business alone for a time, Mr. Tuttle became a partner. The firm name became Jessup and Tuttle, which continued until 1865, when the building was burned and the tannery business came to an end.

Later the late James Galloway acquired the property, enlarged the building and converted it into a malt house. He also put up a steam saw mill in the rear. Logs were bought in different parts of the country, floated down the canal and sawed into lumber. In the 90's Mr. Galloway sold the entire plant to Mr. Merrick of Lyons. After a short time he started to improve the property and after paying out a good deal of money and the malting business began to wane, he abandoned the project and the plans were never carried out. The double house we see at the west end was remodeled and has been occupied since as a double dwelling house. Around 1900 the late Fred W. Clemons bought the property. (The double house was once the hide house for the tannery.) When Mr. Merrick stopped work on the building, that was the last attempt to keep the building up and it fast went to decay. In 1928, Mrs. Melissa Knapp purchased the old wreck and tore it down. The future will reveal its fate. Mrs. Knapp passed away in August, 1930.

Across the way from the shoe factory are the old General Swift buildings where in 1816, a sign "Drake's Wagon and Sleigh Shop" could be seen. The cellar at the old Swift house is in the north end but not much like a modern cellar.

At the foot of Main Street stands the old George Jessup house. He was the son of Deacon Henry Jessup who died in 1854. In the 30's this old white brick house was one of the finest in the village. Here Mr. Jessup lived and brought up his family. He died in the 90's. His children had already married and gone away, and with no one to look after the property, this once fine old brick house fast went to decay. The trolley company purchased the property. Now as we enter the old house and gaze on its deserted and forsaken rooms that are open to all who care to enter, we catch a glimpse of the old winding stairs with its hand carved railing that would do credit to anyone today to duplicate the same. In those days William Kellogg was considered a fine workman and one of the best builders a.round. Many a fine house in town. built about that time, had a hand carved mantel made by him, and this might have been some of his work. The old iron latches are still on the doors. The old window sills made of solid oak being exposed to the weather all these long years, show that time has made its mark and they are fast going to decay.

The time is not far distant when this old house will be torn down and the old Jessup house at the foot of Main Street with its solid and uncracked walls that has stood the test for so many years, will be forgotten. When Henry Jessup, sr., came to Palmyra he bought a good deal of the east end of Main Street, extending north, including the old electric light plant which was at one time a dwelling house, then a shoe shop. Later Jessup and




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Foster in the 50's had a machine shop where they made grain drills and plaster sowers. Later W. H. H. Osborn had a dry house, then came the electric light plant. After serving in this capacity for several years it was at last torn down. Mr. Jessup's land extended east so as to take in the Dealer's factory. The east line wa.s the east line of George Jessup's lot extending south as far as Vienna Street, west to Mill Street, thence west to the east line of Charles Johnson's lot extending south from Main Street to the brook.

Before the Erie Canal went through, the street past the gas house on Railroad Avenue, was not opened up. The Montezuma turnpike extended past the Dealer's factory to Jessup's corner, but when the canal went through, the state had to take care of the little brook that runs under the canal. A culvert had to be made to carry the water under the canal, so they made it long enough, so they could layout the street by the gas house. Later in the 50's they widened the canal and when the old wooden bridges had become unsafe they had to have new bridges. They were made of iron and were longer. The State would not build two bridges and the town could not afford it, so the one on Throop Street was not put up. Mr. Jessup went to the village board and wanted to have the land come back to him, but this the trustees of the village refused to do. Therefore it still remained a street. Now the old canal is filled in so that traffic is again opened up which adds very much to the safety since the coming of the automobile.

At the coming of the Erie Canal a large warehouse called Jessup's warehouse, was built at the east end of the basin on Throop Street. Here Messrs. Davenport, Barnes & Co., carrjed on a very heavy produce and commission business besides a store. This building in the 50's was occupied by Philip Palmer and Henry Tallou, who were in the produce business for a time, when Mr. Tallou withdrew from the firm and Mr. Palmer carried on the business alone for a time. He closed the business in 1857 and went West where he died a few years later. The old warehouse, after standing some time unoccupied, was finally burned. At that time it was owned by the late William Everson. In the 80's James Galloway purchased this lot of Mr. Everson with the intentions of erecting a warehouse in which to store his malt, but he soon sold the malt house and with him the malting business was at an end. After a few years the vacant lot was sold to W. B. Clinton who put up a little shop on the lot. Now it is owned by the Palmyra Creamery Co. This basin was made to accommodate the warehouse where they could come up with their boats to load them. This was called Jessup's Basin. Here was the first collector's office, conducted by Philip Granden, which was later moved to its present location at Roger's basin at the foot of Market Street. South of the Jessup house was the home of John Drummond, who came here in the 30's. One of his daughters married Richard Rapalee and one married Calvin Brown of Shortsville. Later Owen Burns, the cooper, bought the place and used the old house for a storehouse. About 1915 Charles O'Conner bought the property, made a good many repairs, when once




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more the old house became a comfortable dwelling house. It is now owned and occupied by Harvey Bump.

We will now pass the old school house and leave its history for a later date. Adjoining this on the south was the home of the late Henry Addicott, a native of England, who came here in the 30's. Later he bought the corner lot of Mr. Jessup, built the present house and lived here until his death which occurred in 1889. When he first came to Palmyra he worked at odd jobs such as sawing wood and other work. Later he teamed it. At that time General Rogers owned the land where the cemetery now is, which then was all woods. Mr. Rogers had cut the most of the timber but there was still a good deal of timber left, and he told Mr. Addicott he might have the rest of the timber if he would clear it off. This offer Mr. Addicott accepted which paid him well. In 1843 the village bought this land for a cemetery and Mr. Addicott was its first sexton. Later he went into the coopering business, in which he continued until the 60's, when the Burns brothers came from Pennsylvania and bought him out. He then bought a piece of land on the east side of Howell street and opened up a sand pit where he sold and delivered thousands of loads of sand. After Mr. Addicott's death his son, George, came into possession of the property. George died several years ago. His widow is still living on the place, thus keeping the old homestead in the family over 80 years. Another son, Benjamin, now lives in the village and all those who know him could say he was an honest man. When I was a boy 6 years old, Mr. Addicott made a lasting impression upon my mind. One day when he was sawing wood for Mr. Nettiville, who lived in the house where Andrew Luppold now lives, and I lived in a house 10 or 12 feet east, that since has been moved on Fayette Street and has been occupied for several years by Robert Hart, (We had just come from New Hampshire) I brought out my little ax to split a few of the easy sticks when Mr. Addicott made a proposition to me that if I would split wood he would bring me a big apple, when he came back from dinner. lIe could not have made an offer that would have pleased me better for in New Hampshire fruit was scarce at that time and the thought of having a big apple was a pleasure beyond anything I can explain, but when he came back from dinner no apple came. I asked him for the apple. All the answer I got was a grunt, but imagine my disappointment, but the old man never heard the last of it for as long as he lived I dunned him for the apple and all I received from him was a smile.

Now let us take a stroll down Vienna Street. Beginning at the south­east corner of Vienna and Johnson Streets we find standing on the corner a little brick house built in the 50's by the late William Henderson, who at one time ran a livery stable in company with his brother-in-law; Orvil Hibbard, at the foot of Market Street, back of the Ziegler shop, later occupied by Seneca Robinson. The property was owned by Carlton Rogers and was burned in the 80's. Mr. Henderson was in the business in the 50's and 60's. At his death the little house came into the possession of his son Richard, and at the son's death the property was sold to Michael Carey, whose family now occupies the same. On the east, about 1907,




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Thomas Cunningham built this modern house. Mr. Cunningham, who was a section foreman on the New York Central, was retired on a pension in 1929, dying shortly after. The place is now occupied by his son, T. J. Cunningham. Adjoining on the east was the home of John Hibbard for nearly 50 years. He died about 1904. The place is now owned and occupied by Everett Robbins. We now come to the old circus ground of the 40's. Later the late Albert Lampson purchased the lot and erected the present house where he lived until his death which occurred in the 70's. For a good many years he was employed in the Bulmer lumber yard. Mr. Lampson married the daughter of the late John Brown. At Mr. Lampson's death his son Arthur took the place, lived here several years and then moved to New York. Then the place was taken by his brother-in-law, Edwin Tappenden, who is still living there. Today there are but few living that remember the old circus ground. In the early 60's the late Albert Cray bought a lot on the east. A number of years later he sold out and moved away. Now it is owned and occupied by John Callahan, who has had several village offices and now holds a prominent position in the Dealers' Steam Packing Co., while his neighbor on the west, Mr. Tappenden, held for over thirty years avery responsible position at the Garlock factory. In 1924, he was put on the retired list under pay for his faithful services and today he is the good samaritan, looking after the sick. He goes to any home, whether rich or poor, lending a helping hand to the needy, letting the people set their own price, something which is very uncommon in these days. Recently he cared for Mr. Robert Hart, a Civil War veteran, who fell and broke his hip some months ago. No one would be more missed than "Tap," if anything 'should incapacitate him. He has all the paraphernalia of a physician. The citizens of Palmyra will forever owe him a debt of gratitude. Adjoining the Cray property on the east stands a low old cottage built in the 40's by the late William Walton, a native of England. At his death his son, William, jr., came into possession of the property, later his son, Alfred and still later his son owned this place, thus passing on to the fourth generation. 'rhe property is now owned and occupied by Charles Robbins. On the east in the 70's two little cottages were built, the one on the west built by Andrew Cavanaugh, while the one on the east by Daniel Hickey. Now, 1931, one is owned and occupied by Jay Shear and the other by John Adams. We now come to a brick house built by a Mr. Brown, who afterward sold out and moved to Shortsville. Later this place was owned by J. K. Willamson and now it is owned and occupied by Walter Gorman. Passing on, we come to the Braman place which he purchased of a man by the name of Harre. Mr. Braman was a tanner and currier by trade. At his death, which occurred in the 90's, the property was left to his heirs. The daughter, Mrs. Flora Braman Moison is now living on the place. Adjoining on the east is the Carlton Lakey home, son of Thomas Lakey, one of Palmyra's earliest settlers. Carlton died in the 80's. His widow, after living here several years, sold the place to Harry Yerkes and moved away in 1924. The two little houses on the east are old land marks. In 1849, William Pierce owned




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the west one, now owned by James Trotter. The one on the east is owned by Olin Van Cise. The next little brick house on the east was built in the early 50's by Pliny Hibberd. Mr. Hibberd was a carpenter by trade. At his death which occurred in the 80's the little house and four acres of land came to his son Thomas, who was a veteran of the Civil War. After his death the village purchased the property, using the house for a home for the village policeman, Mr. Johnson being the first village policeman to occupy it in 1923. After a few years the village sold the house and frontage to Paul Goodnow. Crossing the cen1etery driveway our first house is where a Mr. Strong lived in the 60's, later sold to Colporteur Durfee of Marion. After his death the late Augustus Jeffrey bought the place. He died in the 90's. His son Charles and daughter Edna now live on the place. The John Parshall place comes next where his sisters lived. Now it is owned by Peter Molner, a native of Holland. The late Patrick McGreal lived in the next house. He died about 1920 and the place went into the hands of John R. Clifford. Now it is owned and occupied by Emil DeBuyser.

The two houses on the east were built by Guile & Jones and Lebrecht on lots bought off the Perry place. They were built about 1912. The first is owned and occupied by LaMont Storr and the seeond by Clayton Sperry. In the 50's Anson Boyingtonl bought the little seven-acre farm on the east. After living here a short time he died and the place was sold to Mr. Talcott, who came here in the early 50's and was engaged in raising tobacco for several years on Maple Avenue. After being in the business several years he sold the place on Vienna Street to a Mr. Walker and went back to Massachusetts. In the 60's the late William Rushmore, who sold his large farm in Farmington, came to Palmyra, and purchased this place. At his death, which occurred about 1904, the property was again sold and William Perry became the owner, a stock dealer. Now he is living on the place.

In the late 50's Stephen Jerdon, the auctioneer, purchased the home and lot on the east. Since his death, which occurred in the 70's, there has been several different owners. Now it is owned and occupied by Jacob Dayton. Next to the Dayton house on the east has been built a new house owned and occupied by James Webster.

We now come to Howell Street, named after a Mr. Howell, one of the earliest settlers, who owned a farm west of here in an early day, and laid out this street. I have been unable to get the exact bounds of this farm, only his west line was the east line of General John Swift's 272 acres, whose west line was the west line of the Eagle Hotel. Mr. Howell, in laying out Howell Street, kept a narrow strip on the east side of the street that could be sold off in village lots, of which William Beck bought six acres, and built a house and barn on the corner of Vienna and Howell Streets. On the opposite corner on the west stands a house built by the late William Foskett. Later Edwin Huxley became the owner, followed by Joseph Gillett, then Frank Keller. Now it is owned by William Durkin.

Passing along on Howell Street our first house after leaving the corner on the west is a house built by William S. Avery. Our next on the south is a house built by the late George Wheeler in the 50's. Mr. Wheeler was




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one of the earliest sextons at the Palmyra cemetery. He succeeded Henry Addicott. This office he held with honor until old age compelled him to retire. He died in the 70's. Our next house was built by the late Charles Wright, who was for many years a wagon maker with his shop on east Canal Street. Mr. Wheeler and Mr. Wright were brothers-in-law, each married a daughter of the late John Brown. The Wheeler place, now is owned by William B. Clinton, while the Wright place is owned by Lewis Carroll. Adjoining on the south is the home of Harriet Clinton, widow of the late Joseph Clinton. The Clinton place is now occupied by Harlow Veeder, a son-in-law of Mrs. Clinton. Passing the Catholic cemetery we come to a small farm owned and occupied by Daniel Vanderwege, bounded on the south by his son-in-Iaw's place, John Elias. Across the way on the east side, is the Hornsby homestead, now occupied by Fred Hornsby and sister Millie Hornsby. Next on the south, down a lane, is the well-kept home of James Noonan.

Just south of the Beck place on the southeast corner of Vienna and Howell Streets is a new home, built and owned by Ernest Rush, and occupied, at present, by John DeCann, who is manager of the local A & P store.

Just east of the Beck place in early days stood an old land mark and for several years was occupied by the Porter family. Later it was moved to the south end of Gates Street on the west side. It was owned at one time by Elmer Jones, followed by William Parker, a native of Walworth, and a veteran of the Civil War, and it is now owned and occupied by William Plummer. Next on the east is a new house owned and occupied by Harry Beach, followed by a new house owned and occupied by Rev. Frank Cook, a retired minister.

The large brick house that stands back from the road was built in the 30's by Mr. Rossman, who sold the house and farm to Samuel Horton in the 40's. Since then it has changed owners several times. Among some of the owners were Absolum Weeks, Isaac Gifford, Merritt Sherman, and Joseph Mumby. Now it is owned and occupied by Henry Mason, whose son, Henry, has the distinction of building the first airplane made in this town. Its first successful flight was made on August 19, 1930. All this airplane he made himself, except the motor which is a rebuilt motorcycle engine. At one time this was a large farm. Now, 20 acres are in the corporation.

Jesse Westfall built the house on the little 10-acre farm on the east, which he sold to Mrs. Draine, wife of Captain William Draine, who was serving at that time in the Union Army. At his death it became by purchase, the property of the late Thomas Cornwell, later by Mr. Klink, and now by James Fries. From the east line of this farm to the mill pond was a tract of land extending south, containing about 30 acres, owned in the 50's by the late Ira Hadsell. We now come to the mill pond.

Let us now return to Throop Street, passing the Addicott house. As we go east our first house is the M. J. Gavin house. Adjoining this on the east is owned by the heirs of the late Owen Burns, who came to Palmyra




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with his brother from Pennsylvania and bought the Addicott cooper shop on Throop Street. Mr. Burns was a cooper by trade. In this shop he carried on an extensive business and employed a good many men making apple barrels and delivering them through the country. This once thriving business has somewhat changed, the business began to wane. Mr. Burns became old, the barrel factory was closed, the old shop was torn down and a dwelling house stands on the site and the name of Burns Cooper Shop has passed into history. Our next house on the east, away back in the early 50's, was the old "Black Bett" house, later the home of Frank Barks, followed by Clark and Bert Storms.

In the 60's the late Alfred Sansbury bought the lot on the east, moved the present little house on this lot which he sold in 1865 to Miss Amanda Bradley.

This little story she used to tell about Judge S. Nelson Sawyer, who lived neighbor to her when a boy. Back of their house in the bed of the old Erie Canal was a pond of water, where in the winter the boys used to slide and skate. His father had given him strict orders to keep away from the pond on the promise of giving a good whipping if found out, but one day the temptation was too great and in an unguarded moment he went down to the pond and stepped on the ice which broke through, getting both feet soaking wet. He went into Miss Bradley's where was always his refuge when in trouble. Here he stayed until both stockings were dry, not forgetting to tell Miss Bradley not to reveal this act of disobedience to his father. This old lady died in 1929, being over 94 years old and the place is now owned and occupied by Abraham Johnson, who lives there alone.

The three houses on the east, for a good many years, were owned by the late William Foskett, who followed boating all his life. The west house was occupied for a good many years by his brother, Augustus. The Foskett family have all passed away. William died in the 80's. Augustus was a tailor and died about 1912. After the death of William, John Hennessey purchased the middle house. The daughter of William Foskett now lives in the east house and James Fox owns the west one. In the 50's the late Isaac Tabor purchased the lot, built the little brick house on the east. Mr. Tabor was a carpenter by trade and a son of Silas Tabor. Isaac was employed a good many years at the Bulmer lumber yard. He died in the 70's. His widow continued to occupy the place for several years. At her death the place passed into the hands of Alice Gifford. It is now owned and occupied by William Ray.

Clinton Tyler now owns the house on the east.

In the vacant lot on the east in early days a house was built and occupied by the late Benjamin Hibberd. After many years the old landmark was torn down. On this same site Mr. Hibberd also built a two­story house on the east, occupying the larger one: He also built the Tyler house which is followed by a new house which is owned and occupied by Mrs. Ida Webb; also followed by a new cottage occupied by Mrs. Daisy




25


Philley. When Tyler's house was first built, his son Ezra, who was a tinsmith by. trade, occupied this house for several years. When he moved to Phelps where he died in the 70's, his brother Charles occupied the house west of the large one. He died in the 90's.

Elizabeth Loudell, mother-in-law of Benjamin Hibberd, owned a large tract of land extending from the line of the large house west, taking several lots; also all the land included in the old part of the old cemetery. Mrs. Gertrude Johnson, whose husband was a war veteran, lives on the east, while the house to the west of the large Hibberd house is occupied by Glenn Cunningham.

We now come to the old Graham place. Mr. Graham was a native of England, coming to this country in the 40's. He was a carpenter by trade. He had two sons, Thomas and William, both serving in the Civil 'Yare There was one daughter. After the death of Mr. Graham, which occurred many years ago, the property remained in the hands of the heirs until about 1918, when it was sold after being made over into a double house. It is now owned by Abram Johnson.

Our next house is the old William Sampson house. Mr. Sampson was uncle to the late Admiral William T. Sampson. It is now owned by Mrs. Alice Walker Middleton Button.

About 1921 James Middleton built a house on this lot and on the east side. He died in 1929. His widow, who subsequently married Stanley Button, still owns the place. Then comes Michael Gorman's house, now owned by Richard Dunn. Adjoining on the east is the new house built on the Walker lot by William. His father, Lemuel Walker, lived on the east.

Then comes the Garrison, Leland Cramer (Edwin Lawler), and the Rifenburg houses.

On the east is the house that Hiram O. Young built about 1905. Among the different owners have been Edwin Robinson, Trautman, Durkin and Pembroke. It is now· owned and occupied by George Pfifer.

The house on the east was built by the late William Jones, who was our street commissioner for several years. He was killed instantly by accident. The place is now owned by Daniel McGuire.

We now come to Kent Street, which was opened in the 70's, but was never accepted by the village. The house on the northwest corner was built in the 80's by a Mr. McLane and is now owned and occupied by Peter Gilman.

Passing along we come to a typical old New England house, owned in the 60's by a Mr. Earl, a blacksmith by trade. Among some of the later owners were Taylor, Williams, Campbell and Ida May Clement.

The next house was built by the late William Brown, a native of England, now owned by Bert Rush. Our next house on the east was once the home of James VanNess, a professional weaver, who came from Columbia County to Palmyra about 1838 or 1840. Mr. VanNess bought a small lot on which he built the small house (now owned by Charles Hornsby residing in Lyons.) He built a little shop, close to the walk, in which he commenced weaving carpets, blankets and coverlets, the latter of which




26


he made a specialty in. Their artistic design and skill in workmanship was the admiration of those who saw them. These attractive wor¥s of art could· be found in many homes in the surrounding towns. Many mothers had one woven to give to each daughter. Now they can be found in many states of the Union where they have been carried by the children or grandchildren and are fondly cherished by them as one of the dearest memories of the old homestead. In 1854 he sold out and bought a small farm in the eastern part of the town. In 1862 he sold his little farm and moved to Hudson, Mich. About 1880, while fighting a forest fire, he became tired and sat down at the foot of a tree to rest. A burned limb fell, striking him on the head, killing him. He is survived by one son, Charles VanNess, a veteran of the Civil War, who is still living in Hudson, Mich., at the age of 87 years. The next house on the east was built in the late 50's by William Smith, a native of England. Now it is owned by William Van Conant.

Adjoining on the east is a little house, which in the 30's was owned by Silas Drake, called "Uncle Drake." He also owned a large two-story house adjoining this, in which he lived. Mr. Drake had a little shop where he did repair work, such as putting in cradle fingers and mending furniture. He also, at one time, had a little mill in the rear where he had a turning lathe. Mr. Drake had no children. One morning in the 20's when he arose, and went to the front door, he saw a market basket on the door step, and on inspecting it, he found a little baby boy, wrapped in a blanket. He took it inside and showed the prize to his wife, and, in waiting in vain for some owner to call, he and Kazia made up their minds they would take it as their own, and tenderly care for it and named it Leonard Drake. After the child had grown to be large enough, he became handy with tools and learned to turn out different things at the lathe in the mill. About 1850 he was employed for a time, working at the lathe in Henry Jenner's cabinet shop. About 1849 he was married to Calista Conant. In 1852 he moved to Michigan where he died several years later.

Mr. Drake was one of the earliest settlers on the street, coming here in the 20's. When they became old, Josiah said he generally cut the bread, for he could carry a little steadier hand than Kezia. Mr. Drake passed away in 1881, aged 90 years, and his wife died in 1874, aged 80 years.

We now come to the Ira Hadsell place, who, in the 20's, came to Palmyra and was also an expert weaver. In 1824 or 1825 he worked on the Erie Canal. After the canal was finished, he bought a little 30-acre farm at the south end of the mill pond. Across the road he bought a lot on which he built a little house and barn, and carried on his little farm until the arrival of Mr. Van Ness, when he hired out to work for the latter until he sold out in 1854. Then Mr. Hadsell bought his looms and patterns and built a shop on his own lot, and continued in the business, until the patronage began to wane, and rugs and carpets were bought more at the stores. Then he closed his shop and turned his attention to his farm, and sold milk in the village for a number of years. He died in 1896 at the age of 83 years.




27


Thus have passed away these two accomplished weavers and the names of James VanNess and Ira Hadsell have passed into history, but their handiwork may be seen in all the surrounding towns, bearing silent testimony to their able workmanship. After the death of Mr. Hadsell, his second wife and son moved to California. At the time the Drake house was burned the Hadsell house and shop was also destroyed. Now there stands on each of these lots new and modern houses. On the Drake lot lives Willis Beach and on the Hadsell lot lives Frank McGuire. The Beach house was built by A. Vanderwege.

We now come to the old mill property. On September 17, 1793, three brothers, Isaac, Jonah and Gilbert Howell came to Palmyra, and arrived by the northern inland route, and bought a tract of land at the east end of the village, of which some say the western boundary line was just north of the Throop house on Main Street, while others say it was the east line of the George Jessup property. It extended as far north as Mud Creek, and as far east as the east line of Edward Bowe's land on Vienna Street. These brothers brought with them irons and stones for a saw and grist mill. But as the stream was small and furnished water only Spring and Fall, for the grinding of grain, the grist mill was abandoned, but the saw mill was used for nearly a hundred and twenty years. Of the Howells, Jonah was the one who carried on the mills. After living in a log house for a time, he built a house east of the mill and on the north side of the road, in which he lived. Vienna Street was not yet laid out until 1805. In the 70's Valentine Natt bought the property on the east side of the brook and built the ice house on the south side of the road and sold ice in the village. In the 60's Ezra Chapman came from Massachusetts to Palmyra, bought the mill and the house on the west side of the brook and ran the saw mill several years, and when the logs became scarce and it no longer paid to run the saw mill, it was converted into a cider mill where they also ground sorghum. Mr. Chapman died in the 80's. Robert and Ezra Sutton came to P'almyra in the 80's and bought out Valentine Natt and Mr. Chapman. They carried on the ice business and ran the cider mill for a number of years, until they sold out to Henry R. Wissick in 1902. In 1914 Edward Bowe acquired the property and still owns it.

Long years have passed sinc.e the little grist mill ground the first bushel of grain to help feed the early pioneers. The arm that guided the mallet and chisel to dress the stone that ground the grain is forever stilled. For more than 120 years the old mill stones lay slumbering unconscious of the past, in the back yard on the west side of the mill, when a few years ago the yard was filled in, covering the old mill stones and now no one knows of their habitation.

Let us once more return to Throop Street. Across from the Jessup basin still stands the old Throop tavern. Its first occupant for a short time was a man by the name of McDonald. Then came Benjamin Throop from Maine, a native of England and a sailor, who came to Palmyra just before the Erie Canal went through, bought out McDonald and moved into this tavern with its brick cellar kitchen in front, now looking very much




28


as it did 100 years ago. He did a thriving business while the canal was being dug. Many a time someone had to sleep on the floor for want of beds. In front, directly opposite the door was a watering trough with a wooden pen stock. The water came through wooden logs. This faithful old fountain slaked the thirst of many a man and beast. Many a boy and girl on their way to and from the old stone school house, as a token of respect, would take a social draught from this old fountain. When the New York Central went through, this watering place was moved further west to a place called the Diamond, thus giving better accommodations to the public. These old watering places will soon be forgotten and known only in history.

The old red barn and shed that stood in the corner east of the tavern to accommodate the public has long since been torn down and dwelling houses are occupying the site. In one corner of the old shed could be seen for many years the old cannon, "Young Hickory," mounted on wheels, waiting the return of another Fourth of July. Then the boys would draw her up on Prospect Hill long before daylight, load her up and touch her off, thus notifying everyone in the village that the glorious old Eagle was again on the wing and "Young Hickory" was again to proclaim it, while in the valley below, Erastus Kellogg played upon the fife, and his brother William beat upon the bass drum and Edwin Tyler put the extra touches on the snare drum.

At one time when "Young Hickory" was called upon to make a speech in front of the Exchange Hotel, one man who was full of glory, wishing to introduce "Young Hickory" to the audience, touched her with a lighted cigar, but "Young Hickory" said, "Hands off. I do my own talking." And for the next two weeks this man could be seen carrying his hand wrapped in a sling.

This old-time custom has long since passed away and no one today can tell whatever became of "Young Hickory." As to those old musicians who were at that time in the prime of life, when the Civil War broke out, they answered their country's call and went forth in the defense of the Stars and Stripes. Edwin Tyler died with small pox. The Kellogg family consisted of five boys and three girls. Four of the boys went to war, but one, Milo, the youngest of the family, returned. He died in 1908. Erastus, William and James never returned. One of the girls married Eugene Smith, the other married William Gilbert. Both of these were in the army and returned at the close of the war, but with broken health. Of all these, not one of the Kelloggs are living today and only known as history records them. Gilbert 'died in the 70's and Smith died in the 80's, and of these old musicians, who never returned, friend or stranger, when in the Village Hall can read their names chiseled in the marble tablet with the names of other comrades who laid down their lives for the Stars and Stripes.

On the east corner of Mill and Main Streets stands the old Jessup block. This building once ran to the south. A portion of it was turned around so as to face Main Street. While the tannery was running, it was used for a boarding house and was called the Long House. In the




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80's the late George Williams purchased this property, made a good many repairs. About 1900 William Darling bought the property and now is still the owner. Many and many are the tenants that have moved in and out of this old building, some for a short time while others stayed longer. The old building looks very much as it did over 80 years ago.

As we pass down Mill Street, which was laid out in 1833, resurveyed in 1852, our first house on the east came into the possession of George Williams, whose name has been mentioned before. He was a contractor and builder. In the 70's he remodeled this brick house and lived here until his death which occurred about 1902. In the 40's, where this brick house stands and the one south owned by John DeVuyst, was a part of the mill yard for the old Jessup saw mill that stood on the east side of Mill Street, while the pond was on the west side. The mill yard extended across the brook and around on the north side of Vienna Street as far as the Garlock house, corner of Throop and Vienna Streets.

At that time there were no houses here and where all those houses now stand was a mill yard where farmers piled their logs that were drawn in the Winter to be sawed into lumber, each taking his turn on the list. This street was only a lane, for it was filled with logs and there was barely room to drive through with a wagon.

In the 40's Draper Allen ran the mill which was kept going during the Winter and Spring months whenever there was sufficient water. General Swift erected this mill at a very early date, and from this old mill went lumber to build many a house and barn for the earlier inhabitants of the village and town. The old mill has long since been torn down and no track or trace of it can be found where once it stood. The name of Draper Allen has been forgotten. When Route 20 went through, the old mill pond was used for a dumping ground. Little cottages now dot the old mill yard where the logs were piled up to wait their turn to be sawed.

Speaking of the old mill yard: As late as in the 40's there were no houses from the Long House on the east side of Mill Street and the north side of Vienna until we come to the corner of Throop and Vienna Streets. On this corner in the early 40's stood an old wood-colored house of a fair size, and was evidently the first house made of frame built on this tract, for at the time Mr. Jessup came into possession of this property it had barely been cleared of forest trees. I have been unable to locate Mr. Jessup's early residence. He would naturally build on his own land and at that time this would be considered a good location. Vienna Street was laid out the year previous to his coming to Palmyra and Throop Street was a main thoroughfare. Taking all this into consideration it would go to show that this was at one time his residence.

In the early 40's a man by the name of Bristol lived here. He was a cooper and had his shop just north of the house. Please do not get this shop mixed with the Burns shop that was further north. In 1845 the late Augustus Soper lived in this house. His son Adelbert was born in this house and spent all his life here in the village. Later the late Morrison Ford bought the property, and lived here until his death which occurred




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in the 90's. Mr. Ford was street commissioner for several years in the village. After his death Olin J. Garlock purchased the property, enlarged the house and converted it into a fine, large double house and is still the owner. Among the houses that now occupy the old mill yard on Vienna Street: The first house west of the Garlock house is the Thomas Maley house. The house adjoining on the west was built by the late Samuel Sawyer. Among the different owners were Spencer Stephens, a Civil War veteran, at one time in the clothing business on Market Street; later a man by the name of Herendeen. Now, and for several years previous, it has been owned and occupied by Judson Garlock. In the 40's the late Isaac Besley built the little one-story cottage on the west. After his death the little place passed into the hands of John K. Williamson. Later Charles Lebrecht became its owner. He built a small house on the east side of the lot and sold it to Charles Brownell who is living there. The original Besley house is owned by Mrs. Mary Zonneville. The house on the west was once owned by Pliny Sexton. Among the different owners were Albert Tremper and it is now owned by Edward Farrell. In passing I would say Mr. Besley was once a business man in our town in the 40's. He had a grocery store on the dock; later a store in the Sanford block. The little house on the corner west was built in the 70's by the late Richard Pritchard. Among the different owners were Mrs. Eugene Conant, Garry West, a Civil War veteran and John Adams. Now a gas station adjoins the house which is owned by William Orlopp.

The Jessup tract extended west of Mill Street to the east line of James Galloway's east line. Later it was owned by the late Charles Johnson. It is now owned by the heirs of the late Lillian Garlock. It also extended from the south side of Main Street on the north to the south side of the mill pond on the south. Mr. Jessup gave it to a daughter shortly after her marriage to Joel Foster, who later became one of the firm of Jessup & Foster in the shoe business on Main Street. On the west lot Mr. Foster erected a fine, large, two-story house, where he lived until his death, which occurred in the 70's.

Mr. Foster came to Palmyra in early life. After his death the property passed into the hands of James Smith. In the 80's Delos Cummings purchased the property, enlarged the house, put on a third story and opened it up as a hotel and it was called the Cummings House. This did not prove to be a paying investment. After a few years it was sold to Olin J. Garlock and Mr. Cummings moved away. Mr. Garlock converted the building into an apartment house and heated it with steam coming from the factory that was just south of the office. After keping this property several years he sold it. Since then it has had several owners.

Our next house on the east was the Tuttle house. Mr. Tuttle was a tanner by trade and was for several years in the tanning business in company with Henry Jessup. In the 60's the old tannery was burned and the business was closed out, and Mr. Tuttle moved away. Later John C. Coates acquired the property and after living here several years sold the little old house to George B. Parker, who had a shoe store in the Jarvis




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block. He named his store "The 400." The little house was moved on the west side of Cuyler Street. Now it is owned by George McKnutt. It is located on the north side of the brook. Mr. Coates built a fine house on the site of the old one. About 1910, he sold this place to F. E. Jackman, who had a laundry on Williams Street. About 1923, George Heath, a native of Palmyra, who, when a young man, went to New York and after a while, wishing to retire somewhat from business, came back to his home town, bought out Mrs. Louisa Smith, who at that time owned the property, and lived in a house adjoining on the east, and east of this is an old land mark, but it has been greatly changed from 85 years ago, wh.en at that time old Mrs. West lived here. She was a great friend to the children and a dear woman. Her husband was a saddler by trade and died in the 40's.

Two of her daughters were missionaries in a foreign land for a great many years. After the death of Mrs. West the place changed hands several times. In the 90's the late George Barnhart bought the place from George French and remodeled the house. Mr. Barnhart was killed several years ago in an automobile accident. His widow, in 1925, married William Spier and is still living on the same place.

Our next on the east in the 70's was owned and occupied by James Hersey, who was a mechanic of more than common ability. In the 90's Mr. Hersey sold to George French and moved East where he died. Mr. French, for a great many years, was manager of the gas works. Now the place is owned and occupied by Frederick Smith. This house was moved here from Catherine Street. His neighbor on the east was Mr. Millard, a millwright by trade. In the 50's he bought the lot and built the house. After his death the late John Brick bought the property and lived here several years. After his death, which occurred in 1911, the place was sold to George Throop. Adjoining on the east was the home of Aschel Hildreth, who moved from Canal Street in the 50's and built this brick house. Mr. Hildreth, as well as his neighbor on the west, was a mill wright. He had one daughter, who married a man by the name of Howe. After his death Hattie Hildreth Howe became a teacher in the Union School. This position she held a good many years, and no doubt she is remembered by a good many of her scholars today.

Our next house on the east was built by John Van Dyne, who was a carpenter and lived on Mill Street. At one time the late Joseph Rogers owned the place and lived there. In 1922 William J. Eibler bought the place of Mrs. Martha Elliott and covered the outside with stucco. It is now owned and occupied by Isaac Van Overbake.

We will pass on to the corner of Mill and Main Streets. Up to 1923 there stood here an old landmark. There are but few living in town today that know that next to the first school house in town stood on this corner. This was called the Democratic school house. After the three school districts came into being, which was in 1835, Mr. Henry Jessup bought the old school house, and made it into a tenant house. In the early 40's the late Anson B. Clemons lived here, father of F. W. Clemons. In 1850 Mr. Banks sold his house on Main Street, (first house west of the Baptist




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church), and bought the old school house. He put an addition on the south and lived here a good many years.

In the 70's he built on the same lot the present house, standing on the west. He moved into the new house and rented the old one. Mr. Banks died several years ago, leaving the property to his three daughters. In 1922 they sold the old place to Reeves Parker, who tore down the old house to erect an oil station. Thus has passed forever away one of the oldest land marks in the village.

Mill Street, although not regularly laid out until 1833, does not mean it was not open to the public until then, for the saw mill was built long before that, and before the saw mill was built this was a runway. In 1852 it was again surveyed. As we pass along the west side of Mill Street the first house is that of Benjamin Dart, who built this little red house in the 30's. He died in the early 40's, leaving a widow and two daughters. One daughter died in the early 50's. The other daughter, Eliza and her mother died a good many years ago. The place came into the possession of a Mr. Wood, a wagon maker, a native of Canada. At his death which occurred in the late 80's the place was left to his daughter, Alice Wood Hickock. She is still living there. The brick house on the south was built in the 40's and has passed into many hands. The little white house near the brook was built in the early 40's by John VanDyne, who was a carpenter, with his shop in the rear. Now it is a dwelling house, owned and occupied by Jacob Shuler.

Since Mr. VanDyne's death there has been several owners. Fred Kelley at one time owned the property and lived there several years. Now it is owned and occupied by Orla Lowe.

Let us pass down Catherine Street, which was regularly laid out in 1854. Previous to this it had been called Chapel Street as far east as Throop Street. In pioneer days, a street that passed a church many times was called Chapel Street. In 1811, when the Methodist Church was built on Johnson Street, it being so near what is now Vienna Street, it was called Chapel Street. At that time there were no houses west of Throop Street. The survey of Catherine Street began at the northwest corner of James Sampson's lot and the northeast corner of William Pritchard's lot, and extended west to its present location. Then from the east end of Catherine Street east, it was called Vienna Street, and the name of Chapel Street was discontinued. The first house on Catherine Street, going west, was built by the late George WilliamR in the 50's, when he first came to Palmyra. After living here a while, he sold out and lived on Mill Street, as before mentioned. Now the place is owned by Virgil Bitterman. The second little cottage is where lived the late Franklin Bogart, (colored) a war veteran, a substitute for P. T. Sexton and was always provided for as long as he lived. The other little hous.es had many owners.

This now completes our journey over the Henry Jessup tract. Many have been the changes since 1806, when he first came to Palmyra. The stumps of the primeval forest trees on Main Street had not yet rotted away. The streets were rough land only fit for the clumsy ox cart. The




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streets were lighted only by the glimmering light of the moon. The canal and railroad was only a chance dream in the midnight slumber of the pioneer.

It is impossible for the young people of today to realize the situation of 120 years ago and can know it only through imagination by story and in song.

On the west corner of Johnson and Vienna Streets is the house where the late Admiral William T. Sampson was born. In 1829 Abner Lakey purchased of Peleg Holmes a corner lot on which he built the house in which Admiral Sampson was born. It was later sold to a man by the name of Crowe, who came from Marion. After Mr. Sampson's occupancy, in the early 50's, the place came into the possession of the late Walter Stephens, who had a second-hand store a good many years on Market Street. After his death, which occurred in the 80's, the place has had different owners. Now it is owned and occupied by Mary S. Parker, daughter of the late James Galloway, one of the old pioneers of the town. Mrs. Parker has occupied the place several years and still retains a good deal of the pioneer energy. One time while her house was being remodeled she thought she would take a hand in the game by putting up the scaffold and laying 5,000 shingles.

Leaving the old Sampson home and passing on west, adjoining the Sampson lot was William Pritchard. In the 70's a Mrs. Butler owned the place. Now it is owned by Mrs. Louise Whipple, who has been its owner for several years.

Adjoining on the west was a little red house, owned by a Mr. Dillon, who lived here in the early 40's. He had a round, freckled-face boy by the name of Pat. Although he wore but one gallows and wore no buttons on the wristbands. to his shirt, Pat wanted to see fair play, and if he saw a larger boy picking on a smaller one, Pat was soon in the fight. Long years have passed since the Dillon family lived here. Others have owned the place. Around 1900, William S. Avery built the present house on the same site. He was followed by John Garlock, who made some improve­ments and lived here until his death, which occurred in 1925. "Uncle John", as he was called, was the father of Olin J. Garlock.

Adjoining on the west, in the 70's, was the home of the late Richard Pritchard. After his death, which occurred in the 80's, the place was sold to William Wackman. He died about 1908. His widow died about 1922. The place now is owned and occupied by William Hassler.

On the west, in the 70's, lived the French family, but for a good many years it has been owned and occupied by Charles Wardwell.

Now let us go to Canal Street, which was opened up soon after the coming of the Erie Canal, but not regularly laid out until December 27, 1830. It was to be called Hall Street and was to be 40 feet wide. It extended as far east as Holmes Street, being named after Peleg Holmes, who gave the land which was laid out on February 22, 1828.

Mr. Holmes lived where O. J. Garlock now lives, on the corner of Main and Clinton Streets. His land extended as far north as Mud Creek




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and from Division Street east to Railroad Avenue and on April 24, 1829, Canal Street was extended east to intersect what is now called Railroad Avenue. That part of Canal Street east of Holmes Street was to be 31 feet wide. The south line of the Exchange Hotel was the north line of said street, thus leaving the veranda in the street.

The Exchange Hotel was built in the 30's by the late Butler Newton. At the west of the hotel he built a warehouse, called Newton's Warehouse.

While Mr. Newton was putting up these buildings he lived in the little white house just across the canal. This house is still standing. At that time it was a nice little white house, with a nice door yard fence in front and at that time a reasonable distance from the canal, and considered a good location on account of its nearness to the canal. But when the canal was widened in 1849, it encroached upon its frontage and brought the canal nearer to the house. After the completion of the hotel, Mr. Newton moved in and was the landlord for a few years. About 1837 or '38 he sold out to Gilbert Howell. In the very early 40's a Mr. Miller became its owner and landlord and a short time after, Jonas Huxley, who had for many years followed boating, lived in and owned the little white house which he had bought of Mr. Newton. lIe sold the same to Isaac Besley, who moved into it. After making this sale he bought the Exchange Hotel of Mr. Miller and became its landlord and after being in the hotel business several years, in the 50's, he traded the hotel for a large fruit farm in Williamson. Although a very lnoderate man he knew how to drive a good bargain. He died a good many years ago on the farm.

In the 60's Thomas Cram became owner and proprietor of the hotel. Previous to Mr. Cram's occupancy it was a two-story building. While in Mr. Cram's possession it was nearly destroyed by fire. When rebuilt, another story was added, making it a three-story building. For several years Mr. Cram had been conductor on a work train on the New York Central. After running the hotel several years It was again sold and has had several owners since.

On the same site of the old gas house, the Thayer brothers had an ashery as early as 1826, where they carried on the business for several years. About 1845 the old dilapidated building was torn down.

Just east of the Exchange Hotel, in that little three-cornered plot between the hotel and Railroad Avenue, Billy Doran, who came to Palmyra before the canal was built, had a small grocery store, where he sold wet and dry groceries. This was a good location and Billy did a good business. Later in the early 50's, he built a new store very much larger on the corner of Holmes Street and Canal Street, where now stands the hardware store of Harry Young, and the little store by the bridge became a shoe shop. Later, the little shop was moved to the basin, which was a little southeast of the hotel, where it was again used for a shoe shop and carried on by John Mills; but its stay was not long. Soon Mr. Mills bought the old stone school house on Throop Street and moved the little shop there where Mr. Mills occupied it as a shop the rest of his life. The little shop is still standing. Mr. Mills lived in the school house.




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Speaking of the Newton warehouse, which was used in the Fall, where they took in apples and potatoes: The late Solomon Butts lived in one end and had a grocery store for several years, but the building became old and dilapidated. Mr. Butts moved away and the old building was torn down and soon forgotten, and all those that did business here have passed away.

Passing on west we come to the Jarvis Soper blacksmith shop, which was enlivened by a little bantam rooster that delighted in flying down from his perch and alighting upon the back of some horse, then strut back and forth and crow with all vengeance that he possessed.

Later, Charles Wright had a wagon shop just east, where now stands two small dwelling houses built by Fred Clemons.

The Soper family consisted of five boys and one girl, who kept the house, their parents having died when some of the children were quite young. Jarvis, being the older, kept the family together. The house in which they lived was just east of the old furnace, and when the old furnace was burned, which was about 1849, the house burned with it.

Speaking of the old furnace, which was an old wooden building erected in the early 30's: The business was carried on by Eldridge Williams, who lived in the large house east of Throop's' Hotel on Main Street. Later, David Porter Sanford, father of Mrs. J. K. Williamson, became a partner for a time. In this old foundry they made stoves and plows. The iron fence in front of the village park on Main Street was made here by William Parsons, Elisha Kellog and Hiram Kelley, who worked in the foundry.

They also at one time cast all parts of a steam engine, which was loaded on a canal boat to go to Buffalo for installation on a Lake Erie steamboat, but the canal boat sank and the engine was an entire loss to Williams and Sanford. Shortly after the old foundry was burned, plans were laid for a new two-story building to be made of stone. The front was of lake stone, drawn by Mr. Sanford from Lake Ontario.

Mr. Sanford was a brother of the late Amos Sanford, a prosperous merchant on Main Street a great many years. His wife was a daughter of Butler Newton.

After carrying on the business a number of years the business was elosed out and Mr. Williams went to Michigan and Mr. Sanford went into the grocery business on Main Street.

In 1861 the foundry was sold to John Bulmer, who came from Pennsylvania, and went into the lumber business where he kept one of the best equipped lumber yards outside the cities in the state.

This business was also burned in the 70's and rebuilt with but one story, as we can plainly see now. In the present building only a few lake stones scattered here and there in the old wall is the only token that marks the spot where once stood the old foundry.

Mr. Bulmer also purchased land adjoining on the west to enlarge his lumber yard. This business he carried on for over 40 years. He died in 1906, being nearly 90 years old. When Mr. Bulmer came to Palmyra he bought the Daniel Gates house on West Main Street, where he built




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the present large, fine house, now owned and occupied by Fred E. Rowley, who came from Pennsylvania a short time after the death of Mr. Bulmer, and also bought out the lumber yard.

The two houses standing in the lumber yard are now owned and occupied by the Adams, and were built a great many years ago by the late General Thomas Rogers, who then lived where O. J. Garlock now lives, on the corner of Clinton and Main Streets.

West of the Adams house in the 40's, Philo Robinson, who was a carpenter, had a shop on which the sign read "Hand Made Sash". Mr. Robinson built and lived in what was the Amos Sanford house in later years. In the early 50's the shop burned and Mr. Robinson went to Michigan where he died several years later.

When Mr. Bulmer came to Palmyra he acquired the lot to enlarge his lumber yard. At the time the shop burned a yellow house that stood hard by on the west was also burned. On this lot Mr. Rowley built a house.

Adjoining on the west was a small two-story house painted yellow, the same color as its neighbor on the east, and was occupied in the 40's by William Maloy. Many and many a family has found shelter and lodging beneath the roof of this little yellow house since Mr. Maloy's time. It is now owned and occupied by Mr. Byers, who has changed its old-time appearance of eighty-five years ago to a more modern neat, white house.

Just back of this little old one-time yellow house, stood the old yellow warehouse built when the canal was first put through, by James Thayer and his twin brother, Levi Thayer. They also built about the same time the two yellow houses mentioned before.

About this same time, they had an ashery on the site of the gas house. This was made of rough hemlock boards. It was torn down in 1844. These men ran a canal boat called the "Twin Brothers". On this boat they carried the potash from the ashery, and grain from their warehouse to an eastern market.

In the 30's, H. K. Jerome came into possession of the warehouse and did a good deal of business in buying grain and pork, and for nearly seventy years the name H. K. Jerome could be seen in large black letters on the front of the building, until torn down about 1902. Among some of those that occupied the warehouse after Mr. Jerome, were C. E. Wilder, W. H. Southwick and William Moore. About 1902 Joseph and Edwin Rogers bought the old building, tore it down and worked the lumber into the large double house that we can now see standing in front. It was later owned by Mrs. Margaret Williamson, and is now owned and occupied by John Byers.

Long years have passed since the yellow warehouse opened its doors to receive its first load of grain, to help fill the newly made bins, or to load some empty boat that floated on the little "Clinton Ditch." But time is fast weaving its veil over the past and these pioneer business men will




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soon be blotted from memory, and the old yellow warehouse will be known only in history.

We now have arrived at Franklin Street, which was laid out on February 22, 1828, recorded January 30, 1829, width, two rods and six links. This street was named after Benjamin Franklin.

Speaking of the two General Rogers houses: These two houses have been occupied by tenants for a great many years. Now they are owned and occupied by the Adams families.

Just east of these houses in the 30's stood a cooper shop. In those days hoops were made from small round poles that were split, thus making the hoops. These poles were mostly of second growth black ash and hickory. The latter, the cooper had to watch closely for those young hickories made fine bows, for the boys who wanted to make a bow and arrow to imitate the young Indian boys who came into town, with their parents to win a quarter by hitting it with their well aimed arrow.

The cooper told the boys that hoop poles were hard to get as no one but a cross-eyed man could afford to cut them, for while he was cutting with one eye, while the pole was being cut, he could be hunting up another with the other eye.

Speaking of the Indians: They would occasionally camp in a piece of timber for a while, that was suitable for making baskets, that they brought into town to sell to buy food and whiskey. They were great beggers, always sending the squaw into the house to beg, while he stayed outside. '

We now return to the Exchange Hotel, where just across the way in a log hut with bark roof was once the home of General John Swift, the founder of our village. Later he built a two-story house. The south end was used for a storehouse, the north end for his dwelling, with a very shallow cellar that could be plainly seen before the building was torn down in 1926. In 1816 the storehouse was used for a wagon shop. The sign read "Drake's Wagon and Sleigh Shop."
BR> Later Thomas Lakey came into possession of this property, including a blacksmith shop, erected in the 20's just east of the wagon shop. In these two shops he carried on blacksmithing and wagon and sleigh making.

About 1850 the old blacksmith shop was torn down and a new one erected a little at the north and east of the old one. In this shop his son, Carlton, carried on blacksmithing for several years. Since in the 70's the business has been carried on by different ones, but the coming of the automobile ruined the business.

Speaking of the old wagon shop: After the retirement of Mr. Lakey from the wagon and sleigh business, Harry Tiller, who had learned the trade from Mr. Lakey, purchased the entire property and carried on the business for a good many years. After Mr. Tiller's death, Mr. Wood and Mr. Fermer rented the shop of Fertis Beal, who had acquired the property and carried on the wagon business, and at his death Fred W. Clemons acquired the property. In 1926 the Standard Oil Company bought the




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entire property of the heirs of F. W. Clemons, tore down the old buildings and erected the present oil station.

Thus have passed away the last vestige that marked the spot where once was the habitation of the founder of our village.

Adjoining this on the west, stands a typical New England 'One-story cottage that once stood on the south side of the lot and facing Main Street and over eighty-five years of age. It was painted a light yellow and had a door knocker on the front door. At that time this neat little cottage was owned and occupied by Mrs. Cynthia Lovell, whose niece, Miss Clara Jerome slept beneath its roof many a night when a young girl. This young lady subsequently became Lady Randolph Churchill of England.

After the death of Mrs. Lovell, Harry Tiller acquired the property. The little cottage was moved to the north side of the lot facing Canal Street as we see it today.

After the death of Mr. Tiller it then came into the possessiQn of Fertis K. Beal. Now it is owned by others. This once bright little yellow cottage has faded into a dirty white. The knocker has been taken from the door and carried away as a relic of the past and its present habitation is known to but few.

We now pass on to Billy Doran's new store on the CQrner of Holmes and Canal Streets as before mentioned. After being in the grocery business several years he sold out and bought the Eagle Hotel and became its proprietor. The stQre building was converted into a livery stable kept by John C. Coates. Coates and Marshall pressed hay here. Later, Hiram O. Young bought the property, erected and kept a large hardware store. Later he sold the same to his son, Harry, who still carries on the business.

Up until into the 40's Canal Street was a residential as well as a business street. Daniel Ward was born in Wales. When quite young he came with his parents to this country and settled in Vermont. When a young man, Daniel came to Palmyra and lived on Johnson Street for a time. Then he moved into the little house west of the Youngs store where he spent the remainder of his life, dying at an advanced age. Mr. Ward was a turner by trade, and worked for James Jenner in the furniture factory as long as the factory ran. Mr. Ward was grandfather to our townsman, Ferris Palmer. After the death of Mr. Ward, Martin Clancy bought the property. At his death it passed into the Bushnell family.

Adjoining this on the west is a little house that Major John Gilbert in the 40's lived in. Mr. Gilbert set the type for the Mormon Bible. Later when Jarvis Soper was burned out, he moved to this house where he lived until his death. The late Edwin Farrell lived here a good many years. Now it is owned and occupied by Katherine Nolan.

Our next on the west is of our New England type. In the early 40's the late Richard Ford, the butcher, lived here. Later Asahel Hildreth, who was a millwright lived here for a time. Later he built the little brick house on lower Main Street, across from the Eagle Hotel. The late




39


Catherine Scalley owned and occupied this place for several years, up to her death. William Stackus bought the property, put on a covering of stucco, besides making other changes, thus making a good looking house of it.

Adjoining on the west about 1900, Oliver Comback (colored) built this little house. After his death Arthur McDonald bought the place.

The two houses across the way were built by General Rogers about 1829. In 1844 William Cray, the cartman lived in the larger house. In the 30's, a cooper shop stood nearby. Now Thomas Adams, sr., owns and occupies one of them'and Thomas Adams, jr., owns and occupies the other house.

Crossing the street again and resuming our journey west, we come to the old William Jarvis homestead, built by him in the 30's. At that time it was considered the finest house in the village and then it was called a good location. Its color has always been white until recently when it received a coat of red paint. Mr. Jarvis was called a very shrewd business man and at that time one of the wealthiest men in the village. He spent the remainder of his life here where he brought up a large family of which only one of the family, Edwin, is living in New York, being over 83 years of age. Mr. Jarvis died April 4, 1884.

The heirs, after holding this property several years, finally sold the old homestead to William Griswold, who now occupies the same. Its old neighbor on the west was erected about the same time by Jacob Sanford, retains the same color and general appearance as when first built nearly a century ago.

These two old houses have stood peacefully side by side with only a fence between them, each keeping their own secrets. The walls of these two old houses are apparently as solid as when first built. In the early 40's the late Asher Cray lived here. At that time he held the office of constable. His first wife died here. Later, Mr. Cray, about 1848 started a brick yard on Railroad Avenue and built the brick house which stands north and east of the mill and back of this house was his brick yard. At one time the brick house on Canal Street was occupied as a Methodist parsonage. A good many years ago the late William Bushnell bought the property. At his death it fell to his heirs, who still own it. His son Patsy, a veteran of the Civil War, now an old man, is living here.

Up until about 1914, there stood adjoining this on the west a large two-story frarne house, equally as old as the two brick houses just mentioned, and in its former days ranked with other good houses. In the early 40's G. O. Chipman, who ran the steam flour mill where the Wayne Coal and Lumber Yard is, lived here. But as Canal Street began to lose its popularity as a residential street, the old house became a tenant house and for want of care it went to decay. John K. Williamson was its owner for several years and when it had passed the habitable stage, Mr. William­son sold the property to Olin J. Garlock, who tore down the old house, leveled off the ground and built a front fence and made a nice tidy lawn.

Passing on to the corner of Canal and Clinton Streets, we come to




40


where Dr. Durfee Chase lived in the 30's, who had a large family. He was the father of Mrs. Louise Lakey and Mrs. George McGown. His office was on Clinton Street in what was once called the Maley house. In 1845 he had an office for a time in the Clemons block on Main Street. In the early 50's the doctor sold the house on Canal Street and purchased the house where now lives Dr. Herman L. Chase on Main Street. The house then stood further back from the street with a little office in front. There he lived and practiced until he became too old to continue any longer. He sold the place and went to live with his daughter, Mrs. George McGown on Washington Street, where he died in the late 60's at an advanced age. Dr. Chase lived in the days of general training and was the captain of a company.

The house on Canal Street was sold to Peter Fox and for many years kept its old-time appearance. The old well at the south door for many years had the same curb with windlass and bucket and a cover over the top to keep dry the rope that drew up the bucket. About 1916 the property was sold out and many improvements made and the property bids fair to last another century.

On the west side of Franklin Street, on the "Dock", as it was called, was a two-story building owned and occupied by the late John Brown. His family lived in the upper story while he kept a grocery store below. He did a thriving business in selling groceries and baked stuff that was made by the family. But in an unguarded moment he signed a paper to accommodate a friend and it ruined him. Isaac Gardner, who succeeded him, also had a bakery there. Mr. Brown had four daughters. One was married to George Wheeler, who later was sexton of the village cemetery for many years. Another married Charles Wright, wagon maker. Another married George VanDyne and another married Albert Lamson, who lived and died on Vienna Street. This large family has all now passed away.

From the store west were groceries, saloons and meat markets. Solomon Carter and David Tubbs kept the saloons. Thomas Austin and Schuyler Parshall kept the meat markets. Others came and went. At the west end of this row of buildings was a large tub with fresh spring water flowing into it. This supplied the groceries, meat markets and saloons, besides the passing boats.

The water came through wooden logs. Here was also an open space where the bus could drive up for passengers at the arrival of the packet. Nearby was a little old and dilapidated brick building that has since been abandoned and was torn down about 1929. This was once the collector's office. The first collector's office was at the foot of Main Street at Jessup's basin. A Mr. Granden was its collector. But this location was of but short duration, when Rogers' basin was chosen. This office was used before it became a free canal.

The captains of all the boats had to stop and give the name of their boat and get their clearance. This was once a lucrative office to the one whose party was in power. Among some of the collectors at Rogers' basin were: Democrats, John Gilbert, Henry Flowers; Republicans, Luther




41


Rawson, Parsons and E. S. Averill. The first collector was Granden, at Jessup's basin. The office was open day and night, the two collectors dividing up the time. This little building was standing up until 1929 when it was torn down. All its neighbors have passed away, save the ones mentioned before. The land on which stood the little collector's office is now owned by C. A. Sessions.

Long before the canal was closed an act was passed making it a free canal and henceforth no toll was to be charged and the collector's office was abandoned.

Now let us return to Franklin Street. We look in vain to see the two­story building where John Brown had his grocery store, nearly ninety years ago. This building was burned in the early 70's. About this time Gardner Wood, who came from the eastern part of the state, purchased the entire property from Franklin Street west to the collector's office.

Adjoining the Brown grocery on the west were three small stores of which two of them were moved to the south and somewhat enlarged. They are owned by C. A. Sessions and occupied as dwelling houses. The third store, a little old red building, now stands west of Fred V. Cleveland's store. On the site of these three stores now stands a large barn, erected by Mr. Wood to acconlmodate canal horses.

The store now owned and occupied by Mr. Cleveland was built by Mr. Wood. A few feet west of the present store, in early days, stood a two-story building that burned in the 60's and the new store was built partly on the site of the old one. David Tubbs lived in the upper story and had his grocery below.

In the late 70's, Henry P. Knowles became owner of this property and during part of that time John Rifenberg had a saloon here.

When quite a young man Fred V. Cleveland came from the eastern part of the state to Palmyra and for a time was in the employ of Mr. Wood. In the 80's he purchased of Mr. Knowles this property and embarked in the grocery business, living for a time in a house he owned on Railroad Avenue, where William Darling now lives. After selling the property to Mr. Darling, he moved to the second story of the store where he now resides. Mr. Cleveland has been a citizen of Palmyra for more than forty years.

Almost directly across the Street from the collector's office is the site of the once famous Bunker Hill Hotel. It was opened as a tavern in 1825 by William W. Burrell. It was originally intended for a private dwelling. Mr. Burrell was succeeded by Gad Higbee; later by William Nottingham.

In 1838 he sold out to Butler Newton and moved to the new hotel on Main Street, but it was known for years all over the state as Nottingham's Hotel. The Bunker Hill Hotel, under the management of Mr. Newton, retained its popularity with the public for he was known the whole length of the canal. His courteous and obliging manner won him a host of friends.

These were glorious days of travel. The packet boat carried nothing




42


but passengers. They took their meals on the boat. The horses were driven tandem and on a trot. Just before arriving in port, the captain would come to the bow of the boat and blow his bugle, thus warning the people that the packet was coming and that all might be ready and make no delay.

The boat was moored at the dock, that the passengers might get off and on the boat. The horses were unhitched from the long tow line in the quickest manner possible. The crack of the driver's whip would ring out as he rushed over the bridge to the Bunker Hill barns where a fresh relay of horses were waiting all ready for the driver to mount, with harness all trimmed with brass in shining splendor and with tassels dangling from their bridles in gaudy colors. He was soon back and fastened to the tow line. The boat was unloosened from its mooring and all were again on their way.

Many times when the packet bugle was blown a good many, out of curiosity, would rush down to see the packet come in.

East of the hotel was a long row of sheds to accommodate farmers when they came to town. Adjoining this on the south, on Clinton Street, were the large hotel barns and livery stable and office with sleeping place for the driver.

Where the sheds were, now stands a three-story building, built by Mr. Newton and F. L. Wood. Later the building was sold to a man from Marion by the. name of Robinson, who kept a grocery here. The late Barnett Davis had a grocery here in the 60's. Afterwards he moved to Main Street. Later the McKecknies had a liquor store, and still later it was owned by Gilbert Everson. It is now an apartment house with veranda extending over the sidewalk on Clinton Street. The site of the old barn is now a fine double house on Clinton Street. The site of the hotel and the remainder of the lot is now owned by C. A. Sessions.

At the time when Mr. Newton kept the hotel it was in the heights of its glory. But when the ·New York Central Railroad was built, for want of patronage, the packet business was discontinued as was also the case with the slow moving freight boats compared to the steam cars, and like the canal, the hotel business began to wane and Mr. Newton sold the property.

Among some of the landlords that followed were: Sanford Calhoon, Joseph Moore, P. W. Tinklepaugh, Davis, William Doran and Lucian Freeman. In the late 60's while Mr. Freeman was the landlord, the hotel burned and was never rebuilt. Now there is nothing to mark the spot where once the famous Bunker Hill Hotel stood, where thousands have gone in for food and lodging or to wait for the arrival of the packet or s.tage coach. All the old-time landmarks have passed away and the name of Bunker Hill Hotel has passed into history.

At the time Mr. Tinklepaugh kept the hotel, the song, "Over Jordan" was quite popular with some, and some practical wag, for fun more than everlasting fame, added another verse as follows:




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P. W. Tinklepaugh keeps the Bunker Hill,
And takes in boarders according.
But if you want to cut a swell,
Go to 'Nottingham's Hotel.
Neither pay for your board or lodging,
And if you want to cut a dash,
Just bundle up your trash,
And go on the other side of Jordan.
So pull off your coat and roll up your sleeves,
For Jordan am a hard road to travel I believe.

Just west of the hotel lived Remus Ferrin and his son Charles and little daughter, Libbie, whose mother died and was the first to be buried in the new cemetery. This was once a fine house as one can see by the looks of the wide corner boards and cornice. On the front door was his name engraved in marble as was then the custom.

About 1850 Mr. Ferrin sold his house on Canal Street and bought of Mr. Banks, the property on the south side of Main Street, where Mrs. McPherson now lives. He tore down the old house and built the present brick house. The house on Canal Street, through neglect,' fast went to decay. About 1900 the late William Phelps bought the old house and made it into a barn. In 1926 C. A. Sessions bought the property, making a garage below and renting the upper story to families.

Passing on west, our next is a frame building where in the very early 50's Alexander Rannie, a native of Scotland, and a baker by trade, started a bakery. For a great many years it has been rented to families. Adjoining on the west is a brick block running to the corner, although two separate pieces of property.

In the east end of this block, in 1845, lived Mr. Tyler, father of Edwin and Wells Tyler. The latter was a clerk in Birdsall and Sanford's store on Main Street. When a young man he was also the postmaster at one time and undoubtedly is remembered by a good many. The former has been mentioned before as a soldier in the Civil War.

About 1923 James Burns purchased this property, tore down the old frame part and made several changes besides a fresh coat of paint, making the old block look better than it did eighty years ago. Mr. Burns died June 25, 1930, leaving his wife, Anna Orlopp Burns, who still resides there.

The corner block in the 40's was owned by Isaac Gardner, who had a bakery on the lower floor and lived in the second story which was entered by a flight of stairs on the outside on Market Street. This building has had a good many different owners, as well as tenants. Billy Doran at one time had a saloon here. The late William Throop at one time had a harness shop here. In the 70's the late Henry T. Knowles owned this property. Now it is owned and occupied by Robert Collins, who conducts a successful variety store there.

Speaking of Mr. Ferrin: He was in the produce business on Canal Street. His storehouse was on the east side of the basin. East of this was a two-story building, where J. K. Cummings in the 30's, had a grocery on the lower floor. He was succeeded by Isaac Besley. The upper story was occupied by families. In the 60's the Ferrin warehouse and the Cummings




44


grocery store were destroyed by fire. In the 70's on the site of the latter, Oliver Durfee and young Henry Southwick built a small warehouse. In the 80's, Alemberl G. Wigglesworth came into possession of this property and also the site of the Ferrin warehouse. He enlarged the storehouse and erected the present coal shed on the Ferrin property. After being in the coal and produce business for several years, he sold out to C. A. Sessions and Dr. Leonard, who continued in the same business for several years. Mr. Wigglesworth went West where he died a few years ago at an advanced age.

Later Mr. Leonard sold out and went to Syracuse where he died a few years ago. Now the firm name became Sessions & Son, the new firm dealing in coal as a specialty. When the Barge Canal went through a storage plant was put up at the West Shore Railroad where they now distribute coal. Mr. Sessions's son is now village Postmaster.

Before the advent of the railroad, a good many of the boats were owned by private individuals, as well as by corporations. Sometimes there would be a break in the canal, then there would be a jam of boats, forty or fifty boats all crowded together and to keep things balanced it would be necessary to have several fights in order to hold their rights. In such a crowd a bully was easily found and sore heads and black eyes would be the result.

Mention might be made of the old-time cartmen, who instead of having a wagon, had a two-wheeled cart that the back end could be tipped down so that barrels and hogsheads could be easily loaded and unloaded.

Among some of the old-time cartmen were Johnny Smith, William Cray, Darius Kyttel, John O'Niel, Henry Huxley and Yankee Clark.

The basin was a cove dug out so that boats could be floated in and be loaded out of the main channel and was called "Roger's Basin", taking its name from General Thomas Rogers, who ovvned the land. This old basin, where millions of bushels of grain have been loaded on boats is fast filling up and will soon pass from memory.

Across the basin to the west was the large storehouse, for a long time called "The New Storehouse," erected in the 30's. Isaac Beecher and David Glossender, who bought grain and pork in large quantities, occupied this building for a long time. In the Winter at that time, pork packing was a great business. At each storehouse they bought heavy pork, which was salted and packed in barrels and when the canal opened in the Spring the barrels of salt pork were sent by boat to an eastern market.

In those days pork raising among the farmers was a lucrative business. It was not an uncommon thing for a farmer to fatten as many as forty heavy hogs. Upon a cold day in the Winter, farmers brought in their pork, piled upon their bob sleighs, some farmers having two or three loads.

At that time Main Street was the pork market. It was indeed a fine display to see the buyers bidding against each other. "I will give you so much for your pork and twenty-five cents extra if you will drive it down to my storehouse."



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At the new storehouse most of the merchandise that came to Palmyra and surrounding country was unloaded. At that time the merchants had no other way of getting their stock of goods only by canal, save a little light freight that came by stage. Consequently they had to lay in their stock of goods in the Fall, enough to last until navigation opened in the Spring.

People coming here from the East would leave their goods here until they found a place to move to.

When the New York Central Railroad went through, the forwarding business on the canal was done away with and passed into history. After this, Mr. Beecher and Mr. Glossender continued in the business only a short time, only buying grain and pork, sending the grain by canal and the pork by rail. At last their men closed out the business. Mr. Beecher died a few years later. Mr. Glossender went on a farm where he died in the 80's. Later, William H. Southwick occupied the same warehouse for a few years until his death, which occurred in the 80's. After his death this famous old storehouse that was once one of the liveliest business places in town, for want of patronage, was finally abandoned and fast went to decay, and finally it was ordered by the village authorities to be torn down, in 1912. Thus another old landmark has passed into history and is forgotten.

We now come to Division Street, surveyed February 22, 1828. "I consent to the laying out of the above road as described, through my land. May 6, 1828. Peleg Holmes."

On May 7, 1828, it was posted on the outside door of the Presbyterian meeting house in the village of Palmyra. It was witnessed and sealed by Peleg Holmes the 14th day of May, 1828. Mr. Holmes owned the land at the north to Mud Creek.

For a moment let us cross the old canal bridge on Division Street. Just as we cross the bridge, at our left, near the towpath, once stood a two-story house, painted white, built in the 20's. The late John Williamson lived here when a young man. In this house his son Charles was born, who in 1915, was Police Justice in our village. In the early 50's, Mr. Williamson bought the property where Clate Silver now lives, just west of the Eagle Hotel. He moved away the old house to Fayette Street, where he lived until he built the present brick house. He lived here a good many years and brought up his family. He was a tailor by trade. About 1850; he bought what is now the Clemons block. This he bought of General Rogers for $1,000. In the west end of this block he kept a general clothing store for several years. Then he sold out and went East to live. When he became old he came back to Palmyra and died here.

Just north of the house on the tow path was a cooper shop where Mr. Lakey employed a good many men, making whiskey barrels. The old white house and cooper shop were torn down a good many years ago.

Just across the way, at the east, was Gramby and Robinson's tannery. Later the old building was torn down and the Western Transportation Company built a barn to accommodate their horses that belonged to their line. At this station they changed horses. A little further east stood




46


another large white house where the father of John Williamson lived, who at one time had been a sailor. He died very suddenly while milking his cow.

A little further east stood a little low brick barn that belonged to another line company. At one time canal horses were shod at this station. When navigation closed in the Fall, farmers used to take their canal horses to keep through the Winter at a price agreed upon, some farmers keeping as many as forty or fifty horses at a time. They ran out to the straw stack through the day and at night they were put in the barn. Sometimes a man went with the horses to look after and care for them during the Winter, boarding with the farmer.

Speaking of the old canal bridge, reminds us of an amusing circumstance that occurred soon after the coming of the New York Central Railroad. A young man, whom for convenience sake, we will call Jimmie, went to Canada and while there got married and brought his bride back to his home in Palmyra. When they had arrived at Rochester, the bride tarried a few days to visit some friends and Jimmie came home on the cars. At the completion of the bride's visit, she was to come down on a canal boat, but Jimmie, not knowing the name of the boat she would come on or the time of her arrival, and to be sure he would not miss her, went out on the bridge and shouted to every passing boat: "Hey Cap'n, have ye a strange woman aboard?"

Across the street, west from the big storehouse in the 30's, was a hat store and dwelling house owned and occupied by N. R. Lampson, who had a fur tannery in the basement where he prepared the skins for the hats which he made and sold on the floor above. David Glossender married their daughter, Mary, who was found dead on the doorstep after being at a dance in the evening. Later, a brother of Mr. Lampson lived here and carried on the same business.

In the 60's Michael Shanley canle into possession of the property. He lived here a good many years. At his death the property came into the possession of P. T. Sexton and at his death it was sold to the Wayne Coal & Lumber Corporation. The old store was made into an office and the dwelling house was remodeled. A coat of red paint adorns the exterior and the name of Shanley house has passed into history.

A little at the south and east of Division Street lies Market Street, surveyed June 16, 1828. A true copy was recorded and posted on the outside door of the Presbyterian meeting house in said village the eighteenth day of June, 1828. Several unsuccessful attempts were made to widen the street on February 22, 1831, June 24, 1837 and May 24, 1843. On the west corner of Canal and Market Streets is where Amos Miner, grandfather of W. W. Miner, in the 30's kept a grocery store. Mr. Miner was a soldier in the War of 1812. While in the grocery business he lived in the brick house on Fayette Street called the Blaby house. After being in the grocery business several years he traded the house and lot for a farm on Canandaigua Street, two miles south of the village, where his grandson now lives. Here he lived until his death, which occurred about 1868. Mr. Miner still kept the store and Sunday morning, February 7, 1847, this building




47


was burned. There had been several incendiary fires in the village and the citizens became thoroughly aroused and determined to put a stop to it. On February 13, a village meeting was called to consider measures necessary to adopt to guard against the fires and detect and punish the guilty one. A reward of five hundred dollars was offered to secure the latter object. A vigilance committee of twenty-five and a confidential committee of three were formed. Fires occurred November 29, 1846, when Anderson's barn was burned and at other times at the Methodist chapel and Jenner's furniture factory, while the Horton block was twice attempted.

After Mr. Miner's store was burned, about 1849, Mr. Miner made a bargain with George Olivett to put up a cheap frame two-story building whereby he was to have the use of the building a certain length of time when it was to revert back to Mr. Miner.

About 1854 Joseph Allen had a grocery store on the lower floor. Mr. Olivett lived on the upper floor. Later William Ryan acquired the property. He lived on the upper floor and had a saloon on the lower floor. The little brick addition that can be seen on the west was put up by Mr. Ryan. After the death of Mr. Ryan it then came into the hands of P. T. Sexton, who was its owner until his death. Now it is owned and occupied by Walter Dennie, who has made a great improvement to the building.

Here on this corner, from the time the canal was first built, many a one who expected fish for dinner fortified himself against a coming drought that usually comes from eating fish. In early days no license was required for the right to sell whiskey. In those good old days it could be bought for 25 cents per gallon. This corner was called "Bloody Corners." for here many a battle has been fought and blood has been spilt before things could be rightly settled.

Every Spring a short strip of the canal bottom had to be cleaned out and a gang of men was employed to do the work. A water boy was also secured to pass around the water. In those days fever and ague was quite prevalant and to guard against this dreaded disease a pail of whiskey was occasionally procured and passed around. On one occasion, and only one, Whiskey Philips, as he was called, said he believed he would not take any this time. But as the boy started to go he yells out: "Hold on, hold on. Life is uncertain and I may not live to see it come around again and I think I had better take a little."

Speaking of fever and ague: This dreaded rnalady that was so common among the early pioneers who settled along Mud Creek or near marshy places is now a thing of the past and almost unknown by the present generation.

Continuing our journey west, we come to the old Charles Bingham blacksmith shop and axe factory, but we look in vain for the old sign that for many years hung over the door with his name painted with lampblack and turpentine. The wood had worn away from the name, leaving it like raised letters. We also look in vain to see the old fashioned bellows and pile of charcoal that had been delivered to him from a burnt pit.

In those days one had to serve an apprenticeship before he could




48


become a blacksmith. Among those who learned the trade of Mr. Bingham were his brother, Alanson, William Gilbert, a veteran of the Civil War, and a son oof the late John Gilbert of Mormon fame, and John J'ohnson, son of Robert Johnson, the mason. John Johnson later went to California where he died several years ago. Mr. Bingham lived just across the street in a little white house just west of the Lampson house. Now it is torn down. After continuing in the business several years, and becoming old, he went out of the business. For several years, John Johnson, the apprentice, owned the little old red shop and rented it to the late John Jeffery, who with his two sons, John, jr., and Augustus carried on blacksmithing for a good many years. Mr. Jeffery owned a little five-acre farm on Walker Road. From here he walked to and from his work each day. On this little farm he died several years ago from old age and hard work. John, jr., died a few years later and Augustus died about 1907. Thus passed away father and two sons, who had toiled together many years in this old shop that is still standing although somewhat enlarged.

Others have come to blow the bellows and strike the sounding blow, but with the coming of the automobile and the doing away with horses and the kicking mule on the canal, blacksmithing of the old order is a thing of the past and there are but few who are learning the trade. Later Charles Wilbur, who had occupied the old shop for several years after Mr. Jeffery, built a shop just west and carried on general blacksmithing for several years. He was a fine workman and did a good deal of fine work outside of common blacksmithing. Later he moved to the Ziegler shop at the foot of Market Street. Mr. Wilbur being somewhat advanced in years and with failing health, after a few years gave up the Ziegler shop and retired from business, dying about 1925, at his home on West Main Street. Thus another good mechanic of the old type has laid down his work for others to take up and follow on. John Shimmin also occupied the old Bingham shop a few years. The old shop is now owned and occupied by others. On the site of the shop stood an old house, occupied for several years by the Landon family.

Between here and the corner as we go west, in the 30's, stood two small, yellow houses. In the 60's James Ried came into possession of the east one and enlarged it somewhat and it was opened up as "Farmers' Hotel." Later the late John Hennessey acquired the property. Still later George Pfifer owned and occupied the hotel. Now it is owned by Lazersons and occupied as a private dwelling.

Several years ago the little house on the corner came into the possession of Jacob Hartman, who converted it into a bottling factory. Now it is owned by other parties.

This now brings us to Williams Street, which was laid out February 10, 1830. A new survey was made on June 22, 1837. Across the street from the blacksmith shop stood the old Drake Ashery on the bank of the canal, where they made soap, potash and candles. Wood ashes were gathered up by a man who went through the country with a team and wagon, carrying on the seat beside him a box filled with calicoes, lead




49


pencils, jewsharps, needles, wooden pocket combs, jewelry, etc. All these were exchanged for wood ashes. The leached ashes were sold back to the farmers for fertilizer. The soap and potash were packed in boxes and sent to market by canal as were also the candles that were not sold at home, for here they found a good market as no other light was used except fish oil. Kerosene was then unknown. Gas and electricity had not yet come into use. In one end of the factory lived David Lown, the weather prophet, who besides making soap was authority on forecasting the weather. Many a time if it did not happen as he predicted it was no trouble to change the date.

When coal came into use for fuel and wood ashes became scarce and Mr. Drake was getting to be an old man, the business was abandoned. Thus ended an old time industry. The old ashery has long since been torn down and not one thing is left to mark where it stood.

Mr. Drake was a bachelor and lived with his sisters and brother John at the family homestead on West Main Street. Now it is owned and occupied by Charles Joyce. Mr. Drake's pleasant and quiet manner won him many friends. This New England family has long since passed away and is nearly forgotten.

Adjoining this on the west is what is familiarly known as the Sexton Coal Yard. In March, 1827, the Palmyra Manufacturing Company was incorporated with $30,000 capital, to produce flour, etc., by George Palmer, Joel McCullen and Thomas Rogers, 2d. They built a steam flour mill on the same site where they did a large business in grinding wheat into flour that was packed into barrels and sent to market by canal. At that time Palmyra was a good wheat, corn and pork market, and the debt on many a farm has been cancelled by the aid of these three staple products.

As there was no railroad, the canal was the only way of transportation. All the marketable produce as far north as the lake came to Palmyra. Later the mill came into the possession of Constant Terry, who lost his money in the enterprise. Later he went to Texas, where he prospered and became wealthy. During the Civil War, his son, Nathaniel Terry, was arrested by the rebels and forced to join the army, from which he later escaped. His father helped him to get to the Union Army. He was killed in an explosion at Mobile Bay. In the 40's, J. O. Chipman ran the steam mill. In those days wood was burned to generate steam instead of coal. In. the 40's the mill was burned and Franklin Lakey came into possession of the site and built a very large warehouse and malt house. He also had a coal yard here.

In all probability Palmyra will never again see the day when so much of that kind of business will be done. It would be hard, indeed, for the young people of today to realize the magnitude of the business that was done at the Palmyra market in those days in the Fall of the year. The street would he lined with wagons loaded with grain, apples and potatoes, waiting to be unloaded. Those farmers living further north would not reach home until long into the night. It was no uncommon sight to see thousands of barrels of apples piled up by the side of the street, wafting




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shipment. The produce buyers would be loading boats all night long to hurry the shipment forward before navigation closed. Buying of produce in the Fall and buying and packing pork in the Winter made Palmyra a lively town.

Most conspicuous of the buyers was Franklin Lakey, who bought everything offered from a muskrat skin to a load of wheat. Mr. Lakey was born in Palmyra, a son of Abner F. Lakey. He had a brother, Ira, who was a sea captain. For a good many years he followed whaling. He also had three sisters and one half-sister. The latter, Mrs. Lucy Lakey Bowman passed away June 27, 1929. His other sisters were Mrs. Allen T. Goldsmith, Mrs. Lilley and another who married a minister. The father owned the Herbert farm on Division Street.

Mr. Lakey commenced doing business in the 30's. When a young man he owned the west end of the John Walton farm and built the old stone house that is still standing and where he lived. At that time he had a slaughter house west of Division Street, near the ice plant on the north side of the road and later had a malt house. Here he slaughtered thousands of sheep every Fall and Winter for the pelts and tallow. The whole carcass was tried out for the tallow. The scraps and offal were fed to the hogs on which they were fatted for market. Hundreds of pelts could be seen spread along on the old rail fence on which they were dried. This would not be a safe thing to do today. He paid from forty-five to sixty cents per head for the sheep. People used to go there to buy mutton. The two hind quarters, called saddles, could be bought from forty to fifty cents, according to size, no weighing. About 1848 he sold his farm and bought all that part of his father's farm lying on the west side of Division Street and built the house now owned by the Wayne Coal and Lumber Corporation, where he spent the rest of his life. About this time he built a distillery on Quaker Road, about 40 rods west of Maple Avenue on the north side of the road. The West Shore Railroad now passes over the site.

In those days a good deal of corn was raised for market and this made Palmyra an excellent market for grain, such as corn and barley. He not only bought of nearby farmers but also bought thousands of bushels that came by boat or wheat damaged by fire or water, if it could be bought cheap enough. The whiskey was also made from this. Four hundred bushels were ground up daily and after the whiskey had been extracted from it, the slop was fed to cattle and hogs. Four hundred barrels of hot slop was fed daily to six hundred and forty head of cattle and two hundred and fifty hogs, besides the hay the cattle ate. The cattle and hogs thrived on that food. At that time a good many cattle and hogs were raised around here which he bought of the farmers. Besides he bought a good many western cattle and hogs. They were all lean in the Fall when first put in, but were fat and sleek when let out in the Spring when they were driven to an eastern market. When the distillery was first built there were no railroads.

The beef was tender and juicy, but the pork was quite oily. About the first of June the cattle were sold. The distillery was not started again




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until Fall. The long row of cheap sheds was on the south side of the road, where twenty barrels of boiling hot slop came out every twenty minutes and ran into three large vats, until the four hundred barrels were all out. There was one thing peculiar about the feeding of this slop. The cattle would starve before they would eat cold slop. Consequently it was fed to them nearly boiling hot. They would sip it as we do hot coffee or tea. It required the help of twelve or fourteen men to look after the cattle and hogs. Besides there were a good many men employed in the distillery.

Mr. Lakey also ran two cooper shops where heavy oak barrels were made to hold the whiskey. These men could command good pay for it all had to be tight work. He also ran two malt houses, one at the warehouse, the other on the site of the old slaughter house. At the warehouse, everything was lively-unloading coal from boats, malting barley, loading boats in the Fall with grain, potatoes and fruit.

Mr. Lakey was also a sagacious man. One night he went over town and remained until quite late. When crossing the flats on going home, he saw a man unloading a large fat sheep and putting it in an old slaughter house that stood on the flat. He mistrusted all was not right and taking the man by the collar led him back to his office on Canal Street, shut the man in and locked the door, closed the wooden shutter to the window and fastened it on the outside with a rail. He then started for the police. When he returned the man had broken jail and departed for parts unknown. The man never came back for the sheep.

Mr. Lakey was twice married. His first wife was Miss Tirza Page, who died November 28, 1853, aged 29 years. For his second wife he married Louisa Chase, daughter of Dr. Durfee Chase. She died October 23, 1920, being 88 years old at the time of her death. Mr. Lakey died June 4, 1875, being 60 years old.

When Mr. Lakey died a good deal of Palmyra business died with him. He employed more men than any other man in town. But as water courses change, so do the different channels of trade. The once thriving village of Palmyra that at one time commanded practically all the trade from the Erie Canal north to the lake, has now settled down to the most quiet little village in the state. The slaughter house, malt houses and distillery have all passed from memory. The West Shore Railroad today passes over the site of them all and no one can point out the spot where once they stood or realize the amount of business and money they represented. Now at the old warehouse, others press the ground with their feet where once he trod. Others go in and out of those old buildings unconscious of the past. The empty bins that were once bursting with the products of the land are now waiting in vain for the return of business that they may again; be filled. The rattling of coal while being elevated from boat to chute has died forever away. The streets are no longer crowded with teams and wagons loaded with farm produce to fill the empty boat. As we pass on down through those old empty storehouses in that lonesome stillness, we start at the sound of our own footsteps. Upon the cupola we read the name "Lakey's Malthouse," almost obliterated by the storms of many




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years. Still further up is the old wooden shovel weather vane, pointing from whence comes the gentle breeze or the most terrific gale, occupying this post and faithfully performing its mssion for nearly seventy years.

After the death of Mr. Lakey, the storehouse property passed to Simerson & Company of New York City. After being in the produce business for a few years the property passed to Pliny T. Sexton. Here he carried on the coal trade for over forty years with Edwin Becwith Anderson as manager. At his death the property was sold. Now the doors are closed, the shutters have darkened the windows and the old Lakey warehouse is remembered only by a few.

Speaking of the Erie Canal: Perhaps it might be interesting to some to give a brief idea of what the Erie Canal meant to Palmyra in its early history, in the way of business for the storehouses that dotted its banks at that time by opening up a market for the farmers in the adjoining towns. Perhaps no one thing as a benefactor to Palmyra was ever received with such open arms and cordial welcome as the Clinton Ditch, as it was called by the opponents of this great enterprise that proved to be one of the best investments the state could have made. Here the merchants north and south received their goods. Palmyra was the terminus for many a pioneer. It was also the shipping place south and north to the lake. The residents of Palmyra saw a constant line of boats pass night and day during the open season.

During the year in which the canal was completed, there went by Utica 13,110 boats and 40,000 people. In 1830, 14,936 canal boats came into and left the harbor at Albany, an average for the open season of sixty boats a day. June 15, 1827, sixty-seven boats arrived in Albany, carrying 14,000 bushels of wheat and other grain. Thirty-five boats cleared at the same time with merchandise. On Saturday of the following week, fifty-one boats arrived and ninety cleared, making an average of eleven boats for every hour of daylight.

This being a great grain producing section, probably no other village on the line felt the benefits of the canal more than Palmyra. When the canal was first opened, Palmyra was a small village of only six hundred inhabitants. In four years it had increased to 1,800. Everyone was eager to see the canal and the boats. The pioneers living as far north as the lake came to Palmyra only when necessity required, for it was a long, tedious ride over a road full of stumps, roots and mudholes. But it was a great event when the whole family was to come to Palmyra to see the canal and the boats. The horses were hitched to the lumber wagon. The wagon chair was put in for the old folks to sit upon. This was a double chair with splint bottom and straight posts. The children's easy seat was a board laid across the box. What would the young people of today think of this glorious ride? Imagine the tired mother after this long jaunt! Indeed, the hardships of the pioneer were many. Money was scarce, reverses were numerous and failures were often.

We again return to the paths of Canal Street, crossing the street and resuming our journey west of Williams Street. The little house on the




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corner and the four houses running to the south were built by Joseph Allen in 1856. The two large two-story houses on the south side are near the century mark. The west house was, in the 30's, the home of the late Leonard Jerome. It was his daughter who subsequently became Lady Randolph Churchill of England, as before mentioned. Later Mr. Jerome became a turfman in New York City, a much quicker pace than drawing wood with oxen from the Guerdon Smith farm.

In the early 50's Joseph Lovett owned these two houses. About 1898 the late Isaac Ryckman bought these two houses and made a good many repairs on them. In 1925 Gilbert Rush, who owned one of them, sold the same. Myron Calhoon owns and occupies the west house.

Our next house on the west was owned in the early 40's by Edwin Gordon and later owned by the Scalley family. Since then it has been owned by different ones.

The neighbor on the west in the late 40's was owned and occupied by James Loughlin, later by John Goggins. One of his sons went to Rome where he studied to become a Catholic priest.

The hill we can see on the south once came to the street. The gravel was drawn away for building roads, bsides the state carried away large quantities for the canal. As soon as the hill was dug back far enough on the vacant lot, two houses were built. In one lived John Cray, the cartman. Later it was moved to Jackson Street. Now it is owned and occupied by Mr. Forshay. All the houses were built after the hill was drawn away, either for road building or canal purposes. The little brick house was built in the 50's by the late Henry Williamson. On the corner once stood another little house built in the 40's by a man by the name of Allen, later owned by Lewis 'Goodell in the 50's. Later Mr. Goodell bought the gothic house on the east and put both houses into one. Since then it has been owned by a good many different ones. Harry Dibble owned it for several years. On the north side of the street is the Crandall Company's factory, now owning and occupying all the land west to Church Street. In the 30's where the main building now stands, stood a foundry where Mr. Dagett made pumps and plows for a good many years. At last Mr. Dagett became an old man and went out of the business. In the 70's the late George W. Cuyler and Isaac Bronson had a lumber yard here. After the death of Mr. Cuyler the business was closed out and the Crandall Company purchased the property, put in machinery and equipment, with Dr. W. J. Hennessy, president and John C. Coates, manager. The company prospered from the start. A few years later the old factory was burned. A new and larger one was built on the same site of the old one. More land was bought and a new and fine office was erected. At this factory they employed a good many men and women. After several years of successful business, Mr. Hennessy died and Mr. Coates became infirm and unable to attend to the business. The business was then conducted for a time by Jenner Hennessy and Frank C. Coates, sons of Hennessy and Coates. In 1923 O. J. Garlock purchased the entire plant.

When the factory was burned, a large two-story house that stood




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adjoining on the east was also burned. A good many years ago the widow of the late Wlliam Kellogg lived here for a time with her large family of five boys and two girls. After they had grown to manhood and womanhood the Civil War came on. Four out of five of her sons answered their country's call of which three of these, William, Erastus and James laid down their lives in its defense. Milo, the youngest of the family, returned. Of the two daughters, one married William Gilbert, son of Major John Gilbert. The other married Eugene Smith, a native of Walworth, grandson of the late George Smith of the same place. The husbands of the two daughters were also in the service of their country, thus showing the loyalty and patriotism in the sons and loyalty and influence of the daughters. Later in the 40's, the Heath family lived here for a number of years. The old man was blind. He had three sons who were all in the Civil War. Isaac returned and Clark and Henry lost their lives when in the service of their country. In the Village Hall we can read the names of the Kelloggs and Heaths who laid down their lives, chiseled in the marble tablet.

Where the Crandall office now stands was the home for many years of "Uncle Billy Tappenden." No cleaner place could be found in the village. He had four sons and two daughters, not one of whom are living. A grandson, Edwin Tappenden, now lives on Vienna Street. Mr. Tappenden was an Englishman by hirth, and a malster by trade. At one time he was a malster for Mr. Lakey, also at the McKachnie Brewery across the way on the west. Uncle Billy had a son, William, who was always full of jokes, and upon one occasion while down at the old blacksmith shop and looking up the road, saw a man coming. He grabbed up a piece of old burlap and threw it over an empty barrel that stood hard by, and was hugging it very tightly when the man came along. He inquired what he was doing. He replied that he had a big rat in the barrel and would he hold the burlap down while he went for a club. The fellow cheerfully grasped the burlap and hugged it tightly and William slipped behind the shop for a club, but instead of returning with a club, he went off up the street and left the man hugging the barrel, waiting in vain for William's return.

Looking across the way to the west, we can see an old two-story cobblestone house with lake stone finish on the outside, built in the 30's by Alexander McKachnie, a native iof Scotland. In the rear he had a brewery and malt house, a small affair at that time. His sale room was in the Phelp's block on Market Street. He later moved tol Canandaigua, where he carried on a large business. Mr. McKachnie boasted with pride that he was the malster and brewer from England, who for more than twenty years presided at the making of the liquor for his Grace, the Earl of Winchelsea. The McKachnie property was put upon the market for sale and was bought by Hiram Mirrick of Lyons and later was sold to Anton Roach and C. A. Sessions, the former taking the house and lot and the latter the gravel bed in the rear, where within the last seventy years thousands of loads of sand and gravel have been taken out. Of the old




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brewery, but little remains to point out its site. A few crumbling walls are all that is left and the name of McKachnie's Brewery has passed into history.

This now completes our journey on Canal Street, which ends at Chapel Street, as it was called in early days, when first opened up, but not regularly surveyed. It extended as far north as the Stephen Durfee farm. Its first survey extended as far north as the north bank of Mud Creek. The next year it was extended to the Nathaniel Harris farm (the John Wright farm) and later surveyed to Stephen Durfee's. On August 20, 1847, a new survey was ma.de to the creek. On June 5, 1860, another survey was made. The road is ninety-two links w'ide to the north bank of Mud Creek.

We now have completed our journey on Canal Street. While on our journey we have called at the bark-roof cabin of General John Swift, the first pioneer and founder of our village, while it yet stood in the midst of a primeval forest. We have called at the homes and business places of over one hundred years ago, down to the present time. We have seen the Clinton Ditch, the enlarged canal of 1850 to the Barge Canal of the present time. We have heard from the full blast of the packet bugle down to its last dying echo. We have seen the old Bunker Hill when in the height of its glory. We have seen it when the black smoke floating skyward told the story of its destruction. We have called at the hat factory, the ashery and the old steam mill. We have called at the two furnaces and seen the molten iron pouring out of the melting pot as it did ninety years ago, down to the gilded office of the Crandall Packing Company of today, whose factory stands on the site of the furnace. We have also called at the old brewery and mingled with the smiles of the past. We have also seen it when it had no fountain and its walls a crumbling mass. We pause to mark the change in the business of long ago. Some of the old storehouses have been burned and nearly blotted from memory, while others, through neglect have gone to decay.

The Erie Canal has changed its course to make a larger waterway to the sea. The pussy willow and the bullfrog now occupy its deserted channel. The packet captain's bugle and the stage driver's horn lies unblown. The rumbling wheels of the old stage coach have died forever away and the crack of the driver's whip is no longer heard.

Those old business men of the pioneer days of Canal Street, that played well their part in the welfare of our village have long since passed on to join the slumbering dead, and soon the pioneers of Canal Street will be known only by the glimmering that history may reveal.

We will return to East Main Street and make our starting point at the old blacksmith shop, near where General John Swift had his bark roof cabin. Just west of the shop stood his frame house that he afterwards built. He lived in the north end, under which he had a shallow cellar which was a small affair. The south end he built later and used it for a store-house. Later, in 1814, it was used for a wagon and sleigh shop, carried on by Mr. Drake and has been used almost continually until its destruction, for the purpose. Thomas Lakey occupied it at one time. The late Harry




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Tiller had a shop here for a good many years. After his death, Joseph Fermer carried on the business for some time, and after his death, about 1918, the old shop become so dilapidated no one has used it since. For several years Thomas Lakey, as far back as the 30's, had a blacksmith shop here. About 1852 the old shop was torn down and a new shop was built a little further to the east and north of the old one. Mr. Lakey became old and went out of the business. He died a good many years ago. He was a brother to Abner F. Lakey. Since his death a good many different ones have occupied the shop. About 1927 all this property was bought by the Standard Oil Company of New York, who tore down the old shops and leveled off the ground and now there stands a fine new gas station, erected by the company.

As we pass on we look in vain for the little yellow cottage where in the 30's lived Mrs. Cynthia Lovell, aunt of Miss Clara Jerome. Miss Jerome became Lady Randolph Churchill of England as mentioned before. We find the little house has been moved on the north side of the lot on Canal Street to make room for the James Jenner house that was moved from the south side of Main Street. We find the onee bright little yellow cottage has faded to a dirty white -- the knocker has been taken from the door and carried away as a relic of the past; such has been the fate of this old landmark. This property was owned at one time by Harry Tiller. Later it passed into the hands of Fertis K. Beal and now it is owned by Thomas O'Malley.

Our next house on the west was once owned by Carlton Rogers. In the 60's it was owned by Gilbert Oliver. Now, and for several years back, it is owned by Joseph Ray, a Civil War Veteran.

In the house adjoining on the west in the late 40's lived J. K. Cummings, and he was followed in the 50's by Philip Palmer. Then Henry Huxley, and later his son Edwin lived here. In the 80's came Patrick Callahan who now owns and occupies the place.

On the west, on the corner of Main and Holmes Streets, we find a large two-story house which in the 20's was called Kellogg's Tavern. Later Eldrige Williams, who owned the foundry bought the property and lived here. In the 50's he sold out and went to Michigan. Since then a good many different ones have owned this old landmark and now it is owned and occupied by the daughters of Howland Peter Wells.

We have now arrived at Holmes Street, named after Peleg Holmes, who owned the property. This street was to be forty-three feet wide and called Holmes Street. It was recorded February 22, 1829. Mr. Holmes also owned Prospect Hill, previous to General Rogers' ownership, from whence it derived its name, "Mt. Holmes". As we cross Holmes Street we come to the Eagle Hotel, built by Abner F. Lakey in the 20's for a cabinet shop. In the 50's it was opened up for a hotel by Billy Doran. Later it was run by John Sweeney. After his death William Throop acquired the property which was in the 60's, when it was opened up as a temperance house, and for over 60 years it has been in the family. Throop's Hotel had a reputation of setting a fine table and extending their hospitality to all.




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When the old people passed away, the son and daughters continued in the business until a few years ago, when becoming tired of hotel life, they closed the house except to a few roomers. The Throop family moved. It is now known as the Eagle Inn and is running to its full extent.

The house on the west was built in the 20's by Abner F. Lakey and in its day was a fine brick house. In the 30's a Mr. Perine bought the property. He was an officer in the U. S. Army and was killed in the Seminole War in Florida in the 40's. After the death of Mr. Perine, William Throop purchased the property in the 50's. Later the property was traded for the Eagle Hotel, Mr. Sweeney's widow taking the property. After the death of Mrs. Sweeney, Charles Deyo acquired the property and after his death, which occurred in the 90's, the place was sold to Edwin North, who was a dentist and a native of Palmyra. Now it is owned by a daughter, Janet North Holt. This fine old house, save a few changes, looks very much as it did nearly a century ago.

Adjoining this on the west is the John Williamson property, as before mentioned. Now this place is owned by O. Clate Silver. Before the brick house was built, James Jenner at onel time lived here.

Our next house on the west was in the 40's owned by a Mr. Linnell. In the 40's Mr. William N etteville lived here. He was a cabinet maker by trade and worked for James Jenner when his shop was in the Jenner block. Different ones have owned this property. It has been owned and occupied for several years by Andrew Luppold, who has changed the appearance both outside and inside of the house so much that its old-time appearance of eighty-five years ago has wholly disappeared. The little short seats on either side of the little square platform in front that were so common in those days have passed into history.

Adjoining on the west is the old brick house that was in the Tyler family for nearly ninety years. Mr. Tyler was a carpenter by trade. He had two sons who left Palmyra a good many years ago. The whole family, except a son living in New York, have passed away, but the old house still stands. It has been remodeled and is now occupied by Ralph Morhous.

Just at the northwest and back from the street, is a two-story house where the late Joseph Allen lived in the 50's. This house has had a good many different owners. Fred Wehrlin now owns and occupies the' place.

Partly in front and on the west is another large two-story house, where eighty-five years ago Mr. Miller once lived. The late Dr. Pitkin once owned and occupied the place on the north side of the street. Now it is owned by Mrs. Rosa Gavin.

In the 30's there stood on the west a narrow, two-story yellow house, with stairs on the outside leading to Dr. North's office, who owned and occupied the same. He had three sons. Henry was as good a dentist as was his son, Edwin C. North. The other sons were George and Larue. This old family have all passed away. Dr. Henry North died in 1844. His son Henry died in the 80's. The other sons left Palmyra a good many years ago. The old North homestead was destroyed by fire about 1908 and




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rebuilt after another pattern. The property is now owned and occupied by Mrs. Sarah De Voist.

In the little brick house on the west, in the 40's lived Dr. Throop and for several years it was owned and occupied by Amos Sanford, jr., who lived here until his death. It is now occupied by Mrs. Celia Truax. It still retains about the same appearance of eighty-five years ago.

After passing the brick house we come to the, old Townsand residence. In the 60's it was owned by A. G. Pierce, followed by General Lyman Reeves, follow'ed by Julius Cleveland. His widow, after living here a few years, sold the property. It was owned and occupied by Mrs. William Truax, who sold it to O. J. Garlock to be made into a flower garden and she moved to the Sanford house on the east.

We now come to the home of Peleg Holmes that stands on the corner of Main and Clinton Streets. Mr. Holmes' land extended north to Mud Creek and east to Railroad Avenue. He also owned Prospect Hill, afterward called Mt. Holmes; also the cemetery lot and the seven-acre lot north of the cemetery on Johnson Street. Now this house is owned by O. J. Garlock. It was in this house that Peleg Holmes lived in 1812. His daughter, Hariett, married General Thomas Rogers, who afterward came into the possession of this property. Mr. Rogers and wife occupied the homestead the remainder of their lives.

Mr. Rogers was born in Richmond, R. I., February 13, 1790. He came to Palmyra when a child and died here on October 5, 1853. His wife, Hariett Holmes Rogers died May 10, 1872. Their only child was the late Carlton Holmes Rogers.

Mr. Rogers was a very plain business man as his dress would indicate. He always wore a stovepipe hat that looked as though he had been to a brick-bat party, for it was so full of dents. He became a large land owner and at his death he owned a good many farms as well as business places in the village. Although the house he lived in is still standing, time and improvement have worked great changes in this old homestead on the corner. His horse barn stood at the north where now stands two houses. The old horse barn stood near the street. The general kept two dogs, one a shepherd and one a bull dog with his tail cut off, his ears cropped and one eye out. It gave him such a savage appearance that the boys in that locality gave him a wide berth and were very careful not to trespass upon the rights of the General.

In those days people used to exercise their shrewdness as well as at the present time, and the old general was no exception to the rule. In those early days it was no uncommon thing to see pigs running in the street. One day the general's pigs got out and took a stroll down to call upon Deacon Jessup. The deacon slips a couple in his pen and says nothing. At feeding time the general found that by actual count two of his pigs were missing. The next day he started out on a still hunt for the pigs and finally located them in the deacon's pen. He goes home but says nothing. In the Winter when butchering time came, the general told the deacon when he got ready to kill hogs to let him know and he would come down and help him




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butcher, as this had always been their custom. At last the time came when the hogs were to be killed. The general was on hand and when the hogs were all nicely dressed and hung up the general went home and hitched up his team on the sleigh, took his hired man along to help load the hogs and drove away.

At another time he went down to Mr. Jessup's shoe factory and bought a pair of boots. It was the custom in those days to give a pair of new boots a good greasing before they had been worn. He asked Mr. Jessup what he would ask to let him fill his boots with oil. Mr. Jessup told him a sixpence. The general paid over the money, went down cellar, put his boots under the faucet, turned on the oil, filled both boots to the top and walked off.

A young dandy had just moved in town. He went to the market to get a piece of meat for dinner, where he saw a rough-looking man standing by. He asked the butcher if he could get someone to carry the meat. The general spoke up and said he would carry it for him. He took the meat and walked along with the man. When he had arrived at the house the man paid him a sixpence. After taking the money, the general told him if he wanted any more meat carried, to call on General Rogers, and he would be glad to do it. The young man saw the embarrassing situation that he had gotten himself into and began to apologize, but the general told him never to be ashamed to carry anything that was for the good of his family.

After the death of Mrs. Rogers, the late Dr. Ingram purchased the property on the east side of Clinton Street. In the 70's he tore down the old-time woodshed and the old barn and built two houses on the site of the barn. He also made a good many changes in the old homestead. Later Dr. Herman L. Chase purchased the large house. After living here several years, in the 90's he sold to O. J. Garlock, the homestead, who also purchased the whole original Rogers property on Clinton Street, including the barn across the way, of which more will be said as we advance on our journey.

Many changes were made, both to the exterior and the interior. On the outside, the shape of the house has experienced a decided change. On the inside all the modern improvements have been added so that the old yellow house of the General's time is now beyond all recognition. Mr. Garlock has beautified the home by setting out flowers and trees at the rear and east side, still further changing the appearance of long ago.

If the General could come back to earth today and stroll through the once substantial and at that time what was considered to be a well equipped and convenient house and compare it with the improvements now in it that were not even heard of in his day, he might wonder if he ever lived there. Thus the world· progresses.

General Thomas Rogers' family were among the earliest pioneers of the town of Palmyra. There were three brothers, James, William and Thomas. They came from Richmond, R. I., about 1792. Thomas preceded his brothers and assisted in surveying the town. His farm was about two




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miles east of the village and north of Vienna Road, called the Budd farm or Hammond farm. This was called the Rogers neighborhood. Mr. Rogers died on the farm. He had two sons and one daughter. Thomas went West, David learned the shoemaker's trade and lived and died on Railroad Avenue in a little house just north of the gas house. The house has been moved still further north. When the Erie Canal went through, it was a neat little cottage, but the widening of the canal and the gas house encroaching upon it, ruined his little home. His shop was on the west side of Market Street in the 30's. The little old dilapidated shop is still standing. He employed two journeymen and one apprentice. In those days they worked until nine o'clock in the winter evenings. Each man had a candle to see to work by. Later he moved across the street into the Jarvis Block. He married Mary Conant, a native of New Hampshire. No more hospitable people ever lived. In early days his wife was called upon many times to go and see some sick person and apply home remedies, as was the custom in those days. Mr. and Mrs. Rogers died in the 80's. A sister married Jerry Bingham, a native of New Hampshire. They lived for a time on Quaker Road. Mr. Camp built the present stone house.

After the death of Thomas Rogers, sr., the widow lived with her daughter and when she died, she then went and lived with her son David, the rest of her life. Her husband was buried in the old Durfee burying ground east of the Central depot.

James Rogers had two sons, Dennis and Thomas. Dennis lived on a large farm about one mile east of Macedon village on Quaker Road, near the lower lock on the old canal. When Mr. Rogers became an old man, in the 50's, he sold the farm to Jackson Downing and moved away. His brother, Thomas, lived on the corner of Main and Clinton Streets in Palmyra, as mentioned before.

William Rogers, a brother of James, was an early judge of Ontario, a member of the legislature and a magistrate. He was prominent in matters concerning Palmyra. He had two sons, Dyer and Hazzard and three daughters, Sophia, who married Draper Allen; Prudence, who married Thayer and Cynthia, who married David Johnson, who lived on a farm on Johnson Street. The brick were made on the farm for this house. Dyer had two sons, Joseph and Edwin. Hazzard had one son, Cullen, and one or two daughters.

After the death of James, father of Thomas and Dennis, who died in early years, William married the widow. By this marriage there was one daughter, Prudence, who married Thayer as mentioned above, and half-sister to Thomas and Dennis. Joseph and Edwin, sons of Dyer, died in the village. Edwin was four times married. His first wife was a daughter of the late Samuel Sherman, an old pioneer who lived and died on his farm on the E,ast Palmyra Road. At his death the farm went to his grandson, Frank Peer. Edwin Rogers had two children, a son and a daughter. His son Albert was a veteran of the Civil War. After living on the farm several years he sold the farm and moved into the village and went into the boot and shoe business with George S. Johnson. He died in 1911. The




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sister married and went to Newark to live, where she died several years ago. When Edwin came into the village he bought a lot off the east side of the original Peleg Holmes dooryard and built a house in which he lived until his death, which occurred several years ago. This house, which was owned and occupied by William A. Cady, was torn down when Mr. Garlock made improvements on his yard.

Cullen Rogers, son of Hazzard Rogers, lived for a good many years on the old homestead farm in the Rogers neighborhood on Vienna Road. He was twice married. By his first wife he had two children, a son and a daughter. The son died when quite young and the daughter married Albert Sheldon of Farmington. She died several years ago. Cullen Rogers married for his second wife, Ella Griswold Wigglesworth, and came into the village to live. He died several years ago on Cuyler Street.

Thus have passed away this old pioneer stock. There is not one living today that bears the name of Rogers, who were loyal to their Christian principals and belief and who took a great interest in the welfare of the community in which they lived. This large family of pioneers will soon be forgotten and the name of the Rogers pioneers will be known only by what history may reveal.

Speaking of O. J. Garlock buying the old barn across the way on the west side of Clinton Street: This old barn, George C. Williams, contractor and builder, bought of the Rogers estate in the 70's and had a shop and lumber yard here. At his death which occurred in the 90's it was sold to Mr. Garlock, who tore it down and sold the site to John Travers, who built a fine house on the lot. Mr. Garlock also built the double house on the north. The large brick house on the south of the Travers place was built by a Mr. Hinman, a contractor and builder, in the 30's. This house was built for George N. Williams, a lawyer, who later sold out and went to California. The late David Sanford bought this property and lived here a good many years. Later it was owned and occupied by the Hall family, by whom it was sold to F. E. Hooker, a veteran of the Civil War. The iron railing on the wall was put up by him. After living here a few years, he sold to O. J. Garlock and moved to Fairport where he died a few years later. Mr. Garlock now owns nearly all the street.

Speaking of David Sanford: He was one of Palmyra's business men. Besides being connected at one time with the Williams foundry, he was at one time in the mercantile business. He was a member of the Zion Episcopal Church and always a liberal subscriber and a willing helper in the church. At his death, which occurred in the 70's he gave $1,000 to the society.

Clinton Street was surveyed and laid out, being two rods and fourteen links in width and called Clinton Street after Governor Clinton. Recorded February 2, 1829.

Let us now pass over on the south side of Main Street, beginning at the Wayne, that was once the Joel Foster house, that has already been mentioned, but in passing let us pause for a moment and inquire who remembers this fine old house with its high board fence in front, all painted




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white, and the little gate with hinges and latch made by the village blacksmith, the gravel walk leading to the front door that was considered the best, instead of one made of cement. And where are the little rest seats on either side of the little platform at the front door that were so common in those days in front of a fine house? All these have nearly passed from memory and can be viewed only by a very few of the older inhabitants when fond memory brings to light the scenes of other days.

We have already described the Henry Jessup tract. Adjoining this on the west was the James Galloway, sr., tract, that extended as far west as the west side of the hotel, running south fifty rods. These lots were sold from time to time for resident and business purposes.

The late Schuyler Parshall in the 40's, lived in the first house west of the Wayne. In the 60's the late Charles Johnson acquired the property. In the 70's he sold the old house which was moved to Throop Street and erected a very fine modern house on the same site of the old one. Mr. Johnson was one of Palmyra's best business men. He was a son of the late David Johnson, who lived out on Johnson Street in early day. After Mr. Johnson was nlarried, which was in the 50's, he came into town and for several years he was employed by Carlton H. Rogers to look after his estate. He kept Mr. Johnson in his employ until his death, which occurred in the 80's, when he closed up the estate.

Mr. Johnson for a good many years, bought pork, poultry and fruit and sold lumber wagons. He was supervisor of the town several terms. He also took a great interest in the welfare of the village. He was president of the Palmyra Agricultural Society for a good many years, until his health failed. To him the citizens. of Palmyra owe a debt of gratitude for through his management the Palmyra Fair was brought to the highest pitch of prosperity. He left no stone unturned by which to make it a success. Mr. Johnson died in the 90's. His wife died a few years before and his only child, a daughter, died a few years later.

The large, fine house was sold to Mrs. Lillian Garlock and made into an apartment house. It is now owned by others.

Adjoining Mr. Johnson on the west, in the early 40's, was the home of the late William H. Southwick. Mr. Southwick was a prominent business man. For a good many years he was a produce buyer and at one time in the 40's was in the lumber trade with Charles Thurber. He was a Justice of the Peace for a good many years. In those days' a Justice of the Peace drew up nearly all the deeds and mortgages and also drew up a good many legal documents. He always enjoyed a good joke. One time after the squire had retired for the night, a couple came to get married. A knock was heard at the door. The squire got up and went to the window and inquired who was there. The young man said they wanted to get married and wanted to know if he would marry them. "Certainly," he said. He says, "John, do you want to marry Hannah, and Hannah, do you want to marry John?" After getting consent of both he pronounced them man and wife and told them to leave the money on the door step. He then shut the window and went back to bed.




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Mr. Southwick came to Palmyra in the 40's and married a daughter of the late William Chapman who lived on the Walworth Road on the farm now called the Whitlock farm. In the 80's Mr. Southwick had a stroke from which he never recovered.

The late Albert Rogers, a veteran of the Civil War and a son of the late Edwin Rogers, in the 80's, sold his farm east of the village on the Vienna Road, came into the village and bought the Southwick place. He went into the boot and shoe business in company with George S. Johnson and continued in this business until his ·death which occurred in 1911. He was the last remnant of that old pioneer stock bearing the name Rogers. His widow is still occupying this place.

We look in vain for the old John Sanders house adjoining this on the west. After his death in the 90's, the place was sold to John Rushmore. About 1905 the Garlock Packing Company bought the property and tore down the old house to make room for their present office that stands in the rear of the lot, leaving a beautiful lawn in front that is well cared for.

Before we go any further west, let us for a moment, step across the street and examine the old James Jenner block, erectd in 1825 by the late Pliny Sexton. At an early date the late James Jenner purchased the property. He lived for a while in the east end and made and sold furniture in the west end. His business increased and be needed more room. He bought the house and lot west of the Garlock driveway on the south side of Main Street. This property he bought of Thomas Ninde. He also bought a lot in the rear of the Garlock office for a furniture factory. This was made of brick. Here he carried on an extensive business and employed a good many men. He made all the furniture from the rough to the finished product. He was also an undertaker. This factory had the reputation of doing good work. He died in the 50's. The factory was burned and rebuilt. After his death, the factory was sold to the late George C. Williams, who had a carpenter shop here. Later the Garlock Packing Company bought the property and started their infant industry, which has grown to its present magnitude.

In the 80's the late Henry Rees Durfee purchased the old Jenner house and lot. He sold the old house to Harry Tiller and it was moved to the east end of Main Street as mentioned before. He built the present house. After Mr. Durfee's death which occurred in 1915, O. J. Garlock purchased the property.

Speaking of the old Jenner block: Families are still living in the east end as they did one hundred years ago and with the exception of the little front fence and gate, it retains its old-time appearance. The old stone steps with scrapers attached, made by the village blacksmith a century ago, are fulfilling the mission assigned to them then. Thousands of weary feet have passed over these old stone steps in that time. Thousands of old men and women, young men and maidens· have pressed them with their feet. Thousands of children have played upon them and sat upon their lap and when these children had grown to manhood and womanhood and went to some other part of the world to make their home, and after many




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years wandered back to old Palmyra and passed on down by the old Jenner block, they beheld once more the old stone steps and iron scrapers where they spent so many happy hours. Once more old friends have met and again fond memory brings to light the scenes of other days.

The west end of the Jenner Block, after the factory had been moved to the south side of the street, was used for a furniture store. After the death of Mr. Jenner, the late Hiram Goodnough carried on the furniture and undertaking for a time. The store has been occupied by different ones. Fred F. Kelley occupied one store for nearly thirty years. Now it is carried on by Thomas Birdsall. The west store was occupied for a good many years by Bennett & Mason, who bought produce and now it is occupied by Stark's Dry Goods Store. This block is now owned by Mrs. Charlotte Jenner Birdsall, daughter of James Jenner.

Once more let us return to the south side of Main Street and resume our journey west. Our next house after leaving the Jenner homestead is a little brick house built by the late Willard Chase. After his death, Miss Adams, who was a doctor, bought the place, lived here and practiced for several years. After her death the late Charles Walton bought the property. Now it is occupied by Frank Burgess.

Adjoining this on the west is the Pliny Sexton homestead. Mr. Sexton was a great friend of the negro. During slavery times, Mr. Sexton was connected with the underground railroad. Many a colored man had been directed to his home where a bed for the night was ready for him; also supper and breakfast furnished. He was then directed to another station and so on until he reached Canada. Mr. Sexton came here in early day. He built the Jenner block. He was a jeweler by trade and opened the first jewelry store. The homestead is now owned by the heirs of his son, Pliny T. Sexton. It looks very much the same as when his father lived there. He died about 1881.

Our next house on the west is the old Abraham Martin place. In the 40's he was in the livery business. At last his health failed and he was an invalid for several years and had no use of his limbs. After his death the house and lot was sold to Dr. Myron Adams, a native of Marion. The old house was sold to Col. F. W. Clemons and moved to Fayette Street. A new house with office was built on the site of the old one. In the 80's, Dr. Donald McPherson purchased the property and Dr. Adams went to California to live. Here Dr. McPherson's first wife died. He married for his second wife, Miss Elizabeth Van Deuzer, daughter of the late Zachariah Van Deuzer. It was in this house that he had his office. He sold his house and lot to Peter Harrington, who is living there now.

West of the McPherson property is what is known as the Tripp Block. At one time it was owned by the late Burros Butler. Later it was sold to Mrs. Tripp who conducted a millinery shop. Mrs. Tripp made a good many improvements on the building and kept an up-to-date store. At her death which occurred in the 80's, the property was sold to John Shear. The upper floor is now occupied by families and the lower floor for business places.

The block adjoining on the west, known as the Horton Block, was





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built before 1830, as history tells that the Mormon Bible was printed in that building and on the second fioor. The bible bears the date 1830. In July, 1829, Mons. H. L. Baltimore opened a barber shop in the basement of the Horton Block, one door east of the Eagle Hotel. The date, therefore, of this building is probably about 1822 or 23 for in this building Palatiah West had a saddle and harness shop in 1824. In 1847 the late William Crandall had a saloon in the basement. He later moved to Michigan. In the 60's Frank Huxley had a saloon here, but this place became unpopular and finally abandoned. In the 50's John Williamson bought this block of General Rogers for $1,000, and after this transfer it was known as the "Williamson Block." In the third story of this building was a large hall, at one time the only large hall in the village, therefore a most popular place for public gatherings of size and character. The local churches at different times, held meetings here, while repairs were being made to their own edifice or while churches were being built. The popularity of this place took a slump when the Opera House and Village Hall were built in 1867. At the lower floor various kinds of business have been carried on. It is doubtful whether or not a complete list of the occupants of this building could be completed. It is not certain how long Mr. West occupied the east store for a harness shop. In 1843 the late Dr. Durfee Chase had an office here. In about 1850, Philip Palmer had a flour and feed store here for a while. William H. Southwick had the post office here. In the 60's Charles Ferrin also had the post office here; Charles Williamson a news room; A. S. Pendry sold farm machinery here in the 70's. For several years John Williamson had a clothing store on the corner. Later a Mr. Lipsky also had a clothing store here. Henry North had a dental office over the east store in the 50's. In the 70's Mr. Williamson sold out and moved away. In the later years, Fred W. Clemons purchased the block and moved into it the printing plant which he purchased of Fred G. Crandall. The paper was again called the Wayne County Journal and was later sold by Mr. Clemons to the Palmyra Printing Company and moved to the Davis Block just west of the Village Hall. Colonel Fred W. Clemons was in the Civil War and died in 1911. The property is now owned by his heirs. The old building looks very much as "it did eighty years ago. The old wooden platform in front is waiting to be torn away and replaced with one of cement and down even with the walk. In front of the block a liberty pole has been standing for nearly one hundred years. In 1892 a new steel pole was put up that was one hundred and seventy feet high. It was found to be too high for the wind and was shortened to one hundred and fifty feet.

Let us return once more to the old Jenner Block across the way, owned by a daughter, Charlotte Jenner Birdsall. Joining this on the west is the Burros Butler Block. Mr. Butler was a tailor by trade and in this block he had his store. He owned the brick house on the west in which he lived. He could go from one to the other through a doorway. Mr. Butler carried on the tailoring business a good many years. After his death, Stephen P. Seymour bought the house and made a good many improvements by putting up an iron fence and remodeling the house. At last he became an




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old man and being quite feeble, sold the house to Pliny T. Sexton and moved away. Mr. Cole bought the store and about 1910 the late Henry Dennis bought the block. He was a painter by trade, also a paper hanger. In this store he kept his goods. He was found dead on the floor of the store, March 18, 1923. Now the store is occupied by R. H. Bareham & Son, who conduct a bakery.

Adjoining the Seymour property was a row of old frame buildings, put up at an early date, extending west to Market Street.

Our first building is the Crowell Block. In front of this old building Mr. Crowell had a store where he sold groceries and candy. He also sold a good deal of cheese. He was an old-fashioned Quaker and rather sharp on a deal. One time a man came in from the country and asked him if he had any good cheese. "Oh, yes," says Mr. Crowell, "I have some cheese that is cheese and meat both." On this recommend the man bought the amount he wanted and went home. The next day when his wife went to put the cheese on the table, she discovered it was full of skippers. So the next time he came to town he went in and told Mr. Crowell that the cheese he bought of him was full of skippers. "Well," said Mr. Crowell, "I told thee it was cheese and meat both." There was a fireplace in the store and on cool days he used to start a fire. The old lady would come in and sit by a cheerful fire and do her knitting.

The neighbor on the west is another pioneer building like the one just passed, erected in early days. It was a two-story frame and kept in 1815 by Patrick O'Rouke, 8l pioneer storekeeper. Samuel Jennings kept a stock of goods here in 1820. Other merchants followed on. Among those of a later date were Birdsall & Sanford. They started their store in the late 30's and kept a general store such as dry goods, groceries and crockery. After a while as times changed, they cut out the groceries and crockery. They continued in this business a good many years. Mr. Birdsall died in the 70's and Mr. Sanford continued in the business until about 1905 when he died and the business closed out. On the outside of this building was an open stairway, leading to the upper story where in the 40's the late Dr. Henry North had a dental office. Later he moved across on the south side of Main Street in the Clemons block. He had this office until his death, which occurred in the 70's.

Our next old store is on the corner of Main and Market Streets. In 1820 it was kept by Samuel Wagstaff. This was another old-time store. As time passed on, changes came and others occupied the same old building. Among some of them were Winchester, Shoecraft & Riggs, Gurnee, who kept a book store, David Sanford, E. P. Johnson and others. In 1876 fire swept away all these old buildings from the west side of the Seymor house to the corner west to Market Street. All this has been rebuilt with brick and are now all owned by others. In this row are Asa Dove, the barber; Mrs. Ann Blair, the beautician; John Lagana, a grocer; F. J. Burgdorf, the florist; and Breen & Vanderwege, who conduct a meat market. The upper floors are occupied by families.

After the corner store was burned, William F. Aldrich purchased the




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site and erected a three-story building on the corner. For several years Leland & Harmon had a clothing store on the corner. About 1905, Charles Rifenberg bought the block, and for several years kept a saloon here in the lower floor, while his family lived in the second story. Now Hart's have a grocery store on the lower floor and the telephone company has their exchange on the second floor. The old pioneer stores have nearly passed from memory. Mr. Crowell and wife, those pleasant old Quakers, of "thee" and "thou," have long since passed away and the bright embers that once shone upon the hearth have lost their glow and the name of Crowell as well as all those who once occupied those old pioneer stores, have passed from memory.

Let us now pa.ss down Market Street and call on some of those old pioneer stores on the east side. In the days of the packet, owing to Market Street doing so much business, it became a busy street. So much that it was considered a convenient street to have the post office on, where it was kept at different times.

In those days it was no uncommon thing to find a person who could neither read nor write, and occasionally it would so happen that the post: master would be called upon to read, now and then, a letter, which he cheerfully did, especially if it was a love letter.

One day a rosy-cheeked Irish girl who expected a letter from her lover, inquired of the postmaster if there was a letter there for her. The postmaster said there was but there was 18 cents postage on it. She told the postmaster she could not read and would he be kind enough to read it for her. To this he very gladly consented and was delighted to accommodate her. After she had heard the contents of the letter she very politely thanked him and started to walk away, but the postmaster said, "Madam, there is 18 cents postage on the letter."

"Oh, well," she replied, "I have no use for the letter and you can have it for your pains," and walked away, leaving the postman a sadder but wiser man.

As we pass on we come to where in the 40's, L. G. Buckley had a harness shop. Mr. Buckley, the harness maker, and Mr. Armington, the blacksmith, had the most elaborate signs on the street. Mr. Buckley's was a good sized sign with a large picture of a saddle with the name, "L. G. Buckley, Harness Maker". That of Mr. Armington was the picture of a man shoeing a horse with the words "Horse Shoeing."

But jokes were plenty and appreciated in those days as well as today. A couple of ladies came into Mr. Buckley's shop. One of them pretended she wanted to buy a side saddle, but Mr. Buckley knew she was trying to play a joke and did not want to be outwitted or bluffed and told her she would have to sit down on the floor so he could take her measure. As she had commenced the joke, she sat down while he marked around her with a piece of chalk, leaving the pattern on the floor.

Mr. Buckley lived on Fayette Street where his daughter, Mrs. H. G. White now lives. Mr. Buckley and Mr. Armington were well known throughout the




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town. Both faithfully performed their mission until they became old and decrepit with years. These old men died a good many years ago. As we leave the Buckley store and pass along, we come to the Underwood meat market, later, in the 50's, kept by George Goodell and others. An interesting incident concerning Goodell and Underwood runs like this: Mr. Underwood gave Mr. Goodell $300 to buy cattle with. Mr. Goodell took the $300 and went to Council Bluff, then in the far West, and stayed about six months. Then he came back and repaid Mr. Underwood, showing his spirit of honesty. He not only paid Mr. Underwood's money back, but bought out the store and paid cash for that, too.

In November, 1876, all these old buildings shared the same fate as their old neighbors on Main Street. They were consumed by the same fire. All the old buildings were replaced by a brick block, owned and occupied by different ones, until about 1819, when Calvin Everson purchased the entire block as far north as the Jarvis block, which was built about 1851, when the late William Jarvis tore down an old building to give place for a brick block, which was occupied by different ones. Among some of them were the late David Rogers, who moved from the little old shop across the way. About 1910, George A. Orlopp purchased the property for $1,000. Mr. Orlopp was a cigar maker by trade. He used the lower part for a store while his family lived in the upper story. Mr. Orlopp died about 1923. His family are still occupying the place.

As we pass along we come to the home and store of M. Ritter. He came here in the 30's, built the house and store combined. His dwelling on the south was a frame, while the store on the north was made of brick. He could pass from one to the other. His wife was an invalid for many years and had to be in an asylum. He lived alone and did most of his own work. He kept an old time general store. He was a very sociable man and had a good deal of country trade. He was a man of good taste as the stone steps and iron fence in front would testify. Mr. Ritter became old and retired from business and went to live with his son in a distant city. The late Walter Stephens owned the property in the late 50's. At his death, which occurred in the 70's, Calvin Everson bought the property. For a good many years he had a cigar store in the brick part, while his brother, Gilbert, had a saloon in the frame part.

While standing across the street and looking at this once little home and business place of long ago, we see over the door a little block of marble with the words, "Ritter's Variety Store" chiseled in it, weather beaten and almost obliterated by time. We look in vain to see the carved stone steps and fence with iron pickets firmly cemented in dressed stone blocks. We can see nothing but a remnant of the old broken blocks of stone. Not an iron picket can be seen. Every one has been wrenched from its socket and wanton destruction had its sway and when I recall the days gone by, something seems to say in yvhispering tones, "Passing away, passing away, passing away".

We now come to the A. G. Myrick marble factory. When Mr. Myrick first came to Palmyra he started in business on Main Street. This was in




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the 30's. His shop was in an old building on the east side of the Lovett lot. In the 40's he moved to Market Street where he carried on the business until his death. After his death, his son carried on the business several years, when he died, about 1908. When he passed away he lived in the same house his father lived in and brought up his family. The place is now owned by others. Leon Molner for a time 'Occupied the house for a barber shop and John Watson has a marble cutting shop in the former shop.

We now pass on to the William Throop harness shop, where in the 60's he did business, but gave up the business and went into the Eagle Hotel as before mentioned. The late Charles Deyo had a shop here until into the 90's when he died, and now the property is owned by others.

The large, old-fashioned yellow house that once was owned by the late Carlton Rogers, later by William Ziegler, is now owned by the heirs. Adjoining this on the north was, in the 30's, the home of Alexander Jarvis, brother of the late William Jarvis. He was a butcher and had a little shop just north of his house in the same yard. He sold out in the early 50's and moved East; later the property came into the possession of Harvey Heath, a Civil War Veteran. He died in the 80's. His daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth Heath Boles now owns and occupies the place. Mr. Heath was born in Palmyra and when a young man he learned to be a carriage ironer and worked for the late Calvin Seeley until the Civil War broke out, when he enlisted. When the War closed he came back to Palmyra and worked for Mr. Seeley the remainder of his working days.

We now come to the property of the late William Phelps. In the 40's this property was owned by the McKachnies, as before mentioned. William Doran owned it in the 70's when Mr. Phelps, a native of Jefferson County, came to Palmyra. He kept a grocery store here until his death, about 1908. He fitted up the upper rooms and lived here. His son, Julius Phelps, owns the property and carries on the same business.

Just north of the Phelps block, in the 40's, stood a little white house, owned by Johnny Smith, the cartman, which has long since been torn away.

It was in the 20's when a stranger of sturdy frame and fine physique came into town on horseback and after looking around for a while, purchased a lot across the way on which he erected a large three-story brick block. This block has long been called the Whitely block, after the name of the man who built it. This building, he extended to the street line, against the advice of some of his neighbors, for they wanted it to be two feet further back. After he had gotten the building well under way, Judge Jerome, who was his neighbor on the south, discovered he was one foot over on his property. The Judge told him he would sell him this land and give him a quit claim deed for the same. To this Mr. Whitely consented. About the time the block was completed, all at once he. disappeared and no one knew where he went, and why he disappeared. No one could guess. It was finally settled upon that he had been a pirate on the high seas and mistrusted an officer was in pursuit of him, and had taken leg bail for security




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and departed to parts unknown. After one or two years he came back and said he had been in Ohio. He sold the property and went back to Ohio. The late General Rogers came into possession of the property and then his son, Carlton. In 1848, when they were widening the canal through the village, the Whitely block was filled with tenants, by those who were working on the canal. It was claimed one family kept a pig in the upper story. In the early 50's Calvin Seeley had a carriage shop here and employed a good many men. Later he moved to Main Street and Root and Howe had a tin shop here for several years, when in the 60's the business was moved to Main Street. The late Alonzo Langdon purchased the property. Calvin Everson at one time had a cigar store here and Mr. Wood had a wagon shop here for several years in. the north end. Mr. Langdon had a grocery in the south end for several years. About 1910 the late John Hennessey bought the property, built a large barn in the rear and carried on a general teaming and carting business until his death, which occurred about 1924. The property is still owned by the heirs.

In the very early 20's, Dorastus Cole built the brick house joining on the north and later sold the property to E. B. Granden. Later he sold the property in the 40's to General Rogers and built the brick house at the south end of Cuyler Street, now owned by Samuel Hunt.

After Mr. Granden had moved away, the late Harry Armington occupied the house for several years and carried on blacksmithing in the old shop which stood on the same site of the present shop. At length Mr. Armington became old and retired from business and moved away. In the 50's Mr. Howe of the firm of Root and Howe, bought the house and lived here until the late 60's, when on account of poor health, he retired from the firm and sold the ihouse to Langdon and Corchran and moved away.

Jacob Ziegler, a veteran of the Civil War, was a German by birth, who enlisted in the army while living in Palmyra. After the close of the war, he returned to Palmyra, married Lena Zipful and in 1870 bought of Langdon and Corchran the brick house, joining the Whitely block on the north. Mr. Ziegler was a carriage ironer and blacksmith by trade. He rented the old Armington shop for a while of Carlton Rogers, who also owned a large barn in the rear, where Hibbard and Henderson carried on the livery business; also running a bus to the New York Central depot. In the early 70's, they went out of business and were succeeded by Seneca Robinson. In the 70's the barn was burned and Mr. Robinson went out of the business and the property was thrown upon the market and Mr. Ziegler, by purchase, came into possession of the entire property. He tore down the old shop, bought a narrow strip on the north, erected the present substantial brick shop, where he did business the remainder of his working days. He died an honored and respected citizen in 1915, at the age of 83. His wife died a few years before. His son, Louis Ziegler, now owns and occupies the property, but the coming of the automobile has ruined the blacksmith business.

As we advance in our journey up the hill, we pass by a large vacant lot,




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containing the remains of an old cellar wall. On this same site, nearly 100 years ago, the late Judge J. K. Jerome erected a fine large house in which he lived a good many years. rrhe little shop down near the street that is worn by time and has become dilapidated by neglect, was his law office. In the 30's Judge Jerome moved his office to Main Street, and the little office was rented to David Rogers for a shoe shop. In the little room in back he kept his leather and wood for in those days they burned wood instead of coal. In front, he had his shop where he did only custom work, making fine and coarse boots and shoes, besides doing cobbling. Anyone who wanted a pair of fine boots or shoes, had a measure of their foot taken and they were made according to order. In those days they worked evenings, except through the months of July and August, when the evenings were short, commencing again the first of September. He had two journeymen and one apprentice. Among some of the journeymen were: Marlin Wood, William Love, Mattie Malone and others. Some of the apprentices were: John Jarvis, James Kelly and John Nolan. The latter went to San Francisco, where he made himself wealthy in the shoe business. James Kelly went to Rochester, where he also went into the shoe business. After John Jarvis had learned his trade, he stayed with Mr. Rogers several years, until the Civil War broke out, when he enlisted in the army. John had a fine voice, and while at work on the bench would sing the old-fashioned songs such as Old Dog Tray and Ben Bolt. When the Jarvis block was built, he moved his shop across the way and stayed there the remainder of his working days as before mentioned. Since then the old shop has had a good many tenants. At one time it was a paint shop. But through the ravages of time and neglect, today it looks very dilapidated.

After Mr. Jerome's death the late Henry Williamson, who was a tailor by trade, bought this property and lived here a good many years. After his death the late Alfred Marshall of the firm of Root and Marshall bought this property and lived here until his death, which occurred about 1910. About that time this old land mark was destroyed by fire. This is now owned by the heirs of Calvin Everson. Thus has passed away another old land mark that was once the pride of the street, and it seems a pity that this old house of more or less historic significance should be destroyed.

Today we can see standing back from the street, another old land mark. This is the brick house in which Draper Allen, in the 30's, lived. He was brother-in-law to General Rogers and ran the old sawmill on Mill Street. There are but few today who even heard of him. This old house has had several owners since Mr. Allen's time. Now it is owned by Ralph Sessions.

Our next is the "Oyster Bay" where Solomon Carter, sometimes called "Professor Carter," kept a saloon for a good many years. He also had one on the dock when boats were running. He died several years ago. The property has had several owners since his death and was always used for a saloon until about 1915, when John Bain bought the property and sold harnesses, etc. Adjoining the "Oyster Bay" on the south were two pioneer stores, owned in the 40's by Henry Williamson, who was a tailor by trade.




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He had a tailor shop in the north store, while the other was used for a meat market by different ones. Among some of them were, in the 40's, Thomas Austin, in the 50's, the late Jonathan Housten, who later went to the Civil War where he died, followed by William Sherman and George Goodell. In the 70's the late Spencer Stephens had a clothing store in the north one and F. W. Clemons printed the Wayne County Journal in the south one. Mr. Stephens was a veteran of the Civil War and during his occupancy the store burned. It was repaired and burned the second time, which told the story of its destruction and was replaced by two wooden buildings and at one time was owned by John C. Coates. Later it was owned by Edwin Parker, who kept a saloon for several years, occupying both stores. Now Max Maddy has a clothing store here. When these two old buildings were burned, the old land. marks on both sides of the street and around the corner can be seen only by the glimmering light of history.

The old two-story building on the south with lakestone front was erected in the 30's by the late William Tilden, who was a tin smith. Here he had his shop for several years. Finally he sold out and moved on a farm four miles southeast of the village, where he spent the remainder of his life. He died June 14, 1869.

It was in the 50's when two young men, Messrs. Root and Howe, entered into partnership and started in the same business in this same block. For a sign a tea kettle fastened to a pole extended from the second story. As their business increased and needed more room, they moved to the Whitely block, as mentioned before. Mr. Root was a native of Vermont and at one time he was president of the village. While in the Whitely block, Mr. Howe's health failed and he became almost helpless. He withdrew from the firm and died a few years later in the 70's. Mr. Root, for his next partner, in the 60's, took in Alfred P. Marshall, a brother-in-law, who married Charlotte Gordon. While in the Whitely block they started peddling-carts through the country. At one time they had as many as ten or twelve carts on the road at a time, swapping their wares for rags or anything the farmers had to sell, but later changes came in their business as in a good many other kinds of business, until it was no longer profitable. In the 70's they moved to Main Street, in the store now Congdon's shoe store. While here the peddling-carts were all taken from the road. Mr. Root died in the 70's. Mr. Marshall kept in the business for a time when the business was closed out. Mr. Marshall died about 1910.

Returing to the Tilden block: In the 70's, the late Whitney Powers purchased the Tilden block and had a meat market here for several years. At his death which occurred in the 80's, the property passed into the hands of his son, Charles. At his death, which 'Occurred several years after, the property passed into the hands of Bird & Flynn Company to be used in connection with their hardware store on the corner.

This now concludes our journey on Market Street, which was laid out and surveyed on June 16, 1828, and a true copy recorded and posted on the outward door of the Presbyterian meeting house in said village, this 18th of June, 1828. The second survey was recorded the 6th day of March, 1846.



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We will now resume our journey on Main Street. Beginning on the corner of Main and Market Streets, we find a little, low, one-story building where in 1812 Joseph Colt had a store. Mr. Colt was also the owner of two Durham boats and it is recorded that in 1804, Silas Stoddard, Gilbert Howell, Cooper Culver, John Phelps and William Clark took their boats, loaded them with flour and pork and went to Schenectady and brought back a load of goods. They journeyed via Mud Creek and took two months. Mr. Colt later moved to the little brick and wood store west of the Bowman store, now owned by William Bowman. Hubbel Hall was Mr. Colt's partner for a time. Mr. Colt died in 1831. His son, Joseph, carried on the business for a time, then sold out and went to Erie, then to Albany. Mr. Hall succeeded. the Colt's in business and was in time followed by Seymour Scoville, who became a prominent and influential man.

Returning to the corner: In the early 30's the old wooden store was torn down to make way for a brick block. Sexton and Butterfield were its first occupants, who in 1835, started in the hardware business with William H. Bowm.an in their employ, who in that year had come from Westmoreland, N. H. Two years later, it was said, next door and in the same block, he opened a hardware store with Stephen P. Seymore as partner, with the firm name of Bowman and Seymore. In 1846, Seymore sold out to Bowman. After Mr. Sexton retired from the firm, then it became Butterfield and Walker. About 1850, William P. Lampson was taken into the firm, and the name became Butterfield, Lampson and Walker. Then Lampson retired and in 1855, it became Bowman and Walker. The partition was removed between the two stores, thus making a double store. Nine years later, James E. Walker retired and the firm became William H. Bowman and Sons. Later, one son, George M. Bowman, withdrew from the firm and it became William H. Bowman and Son. Later the other son, Charles Bowman, withdrew. Then the firm became William H. Bowman and Goldsmith. On December 30, 1875, Ira Lakey bought the two stores, occupied by the firm for $7,000. Two months later, George T. Royce of Albion, bought the real estate. Although he soon sold out his interest in the stock, he still held title to the real estate and C. B. and E. D. Brigham, in 1880, succeeded the combination.

Death removed the junior member of the firm about 1895, but the firm name continued until 1903, when the other brother died and the store soon became known as the Bird and Ross and Co., Hardware Store. In 1878, while repairing the building, one noon while all the workmen had gone to dinner, except Samuel Trull, who had brought his dinner with him, and while sitting in the building eating his noonday meal, the building collapsed and Mr. Trull was killed.

Immediately after the building had fallen, plans were soon made for a new building and the present three-story building was erected on the site of the old one.

The sale of the store by Messrs. Bird and Ross resulted in a change of the firm name. Thomas Flynn and Charles B. Joyce became members of




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the firm. Later Charles B. Joyce retired and the firm is now known as Bird & Flynn Co., and has borne this name for several years. The present proprietors are now maintaining the reputation which seems to have attended the success of the earlier owners.

The little store on the west and in the same building was at one time occupied by E. E. Bates, jeweler, and now and for the past twenty years it has been occupied by Roy D. Fassett, also a jeweler. The second floor of the Royce block was for many years occupied by the late Henry R. Durfee as a law office, later by Durfee and Lines and now by the surviving member, J. Francis Lines. Antone Roach at one time occupied the room over the Fassett store for a tailor shop.

Our next store on the west was evidently built later than the original brick block on the east. In the 30's, Doctors May and Hoyt had a drug store here, who were about the first occupants if not the first.

Dr. May was a native of Vermont. He died September 10, 1865, aged 57 years. Dr. Hoyt dieq. in 1857, aged 55 years. After several years they closed out the drug business, their partnership was dissolved and each one had an office of his own and practiced medicine the rest of his working days. Later Stillman Jackson, who was a gunsmith by trade, had a shop and store here. Later he moved his shop on Washington Street, where he lived.

Not many will recall the drug store kept by Gallup and Crookston. James Gallup was born in Brooklyn, Conn., May 25, 1820. He was a brother of John Gallup, both of whom lived in Palmyra in the 50's. John Gallup went to Michigan from here, but James remained and married Hannah Capron whose father lived on the Walworth Road just south of the Walworth railroad station.
Mr. Gallup lived on the corner of Canandaigua and Jackson Streets, where the Farnham property is located. James died in Grand Rapids, Mich., in 1904. His partner, James A. Crookston, was born in Newark about 1829 and came to Palmyra in 1843, as an apprentice. A few years later he became a partner of Mr. Gallup in the above named store. On March 4, 1859, J. A. Crookston & Company sold out to Clark S. Chase and William Tucker. Mr. Chase had been a clerk in the Hemingway store.

Mr. Crookston went to Grand Rapids, Mich., and in April, 1859, again embarked in the drug business. After a short time he found the climate did not agree with him and came back to Palmyra where we find him in a hat and cap store under the firm name of Crookston & Smith. He again returned to Michigan where he died several years later.

Ten years later Chase withdrew from the firm and the store was continued alone by William H. Tucker. A short time after this, Charles W. Tucker, his son, who had been in Troy, gave up his position there and came to Palmyra and entered into partnership with the firm name of Tucker & Son. A few years later the son died very suddenly, leaving Mr. Tucker alone. Wright Gardner was for several years clerk in this store, and in 1876, when the store was sold by Mr. Tucker, the firm became Gardner & Davis, Menzo Davis being interested with Wright Gardner in the owner-




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ship. This partnership continued until September 1, 1878, when it was dissolved and Mr. Davis continued in the business. For eight years he operated the store alone and made money. In 1888 he sold out to Charles B. Bowman & Son. The local papers said "$40,000 to the good." Mr. Davis went to California and built a hotel at Orange. In five years the real estate boom in Orange was off, and he returned to Palmyra and built the Davis block. The death of Charles B. Bowman occurred in 1898. The senior member of the firm left the management of the store to the son, William H. Bowman, who still continues the success which has always seemed to follow in that particular location.

When William H. Tucker sold out his interest in the store he still retained the real estate which W. H. Bowman bought of the widow about 1915. It was either when the block was first built or some time later, when the chimney was being repaired, that the masons wanted a good cap stone for the top. So he went to the marble factory and there found two pieces of grave stone that he thought were just the thing, one bearing this inscription: "Parmelia, wife of Ambrose Hall. Died May, 1832," the other, "Demarius, wife of W. D. Wylie. Died January 2, 1836." If these stones were put upon the chimney when first built, it would show the building was not put up until after that date. These people were undoubtedly buried in the old cemetery on Church Street, for the new cemetery was not opened until 1844.

When William H. Bowman came to Palmyra in 1835, he moved into what is now called the Blaby house on Fayette Street. He later bought the brick house on the south and enlarged it and made a good many changes. Here he lived until his death which occurred in the 80's. He left two sons; George and Charles. George died a few years after his father. Charles died in 1898 as before mentioned. A granddaughter, Mrs. Mary Bowman Lawrence, now owns and occupies the homestead. William H. Bowman, a grandson and a son of Charles, is in the store as before mentioned.

For over ninety years the Bowman family has been represented in a business way around this corner.

We now come to the only old pioneer store left on the street. All the others have been burned or torn down. In 1810 it was occupied by Cole, thus making it far beyond the century mark. I have no knowledge who succeeded Seymour Scoville until we come to George Stoddard, who in the 80's had a shoe store here, followed by Nims & Avery, who carried on the same business. Later White & Ives had a jewelry store here; the late Henry Birdsall, a clothing store; later Walter Stephens, a second-hand clothing store. In the 70's, Henry M. Johnson became owner of the property and for a while was in the boot and shoe business with his son-in-law, John Schofield. Later the firm was known as Schofield & George S. Johnson. After a time Schofield retired and the firm name became Johnson & Rogers. In the 80's they bought the Root store on the west and made a good many improvements suitable to their business.

William H. Bowman now owns the old store and has for several years.




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At one time it was rented for a candy kitchen. Now Edward Farrell has an up-to-date barber shop here, and Albert Lawrence also sells radios in part of the shop with Farrell.

The alley on the west between these two stores has for many years been a public drive and has assisted in making ingress and egress to and from the rest of the stores to the west an easy matter.

On the site where the Brown block is, Nathan Thayer opened a store. He was succeeded by his brothers, Joel and Levi, who did an extensive business. They bought produce, dealt heavily in the purchase of cattle and were of material benefit to the village. For a time they conducted an ashery on the present site of the gas house at the lower end of Canal Street and shipped via Pultneyville to Montreal. The Thayers were twin brothers and as such were designated. They built a number of freight boats for the canal trade, one of which took the name 'Twin Brothers."

It was in the 20's when a Mr. Brown of New York furnished the money to purchase the cheap wooden stores that had been occupied by the Thayers. He tore them down and erected the present three-story brick block which has always borne the name of "Brown Block." This block contained four stores with stairway in the center. The first store on the east, was in the 40's, occupied by Edwin M. Anderson, who carried on the boot and shoe business several years. He made all his own goods in the rooms above and employed several men. He also bought hides. Besides carrying on the store he was a contractor on the old Erie Canal when it was enlarged.

The local papers of January, 1870, report the sale of the brick shoe store to Pancost & Sage of Rochester. John F. Strain, who had been a clerk for Mr. Anderson for a good many years, became a member of the firm which took possession about the time that Pancost & Sage went out. In 1870, because of the opening of the store in the Cuyler block, many changes were made in the Main Street firms. Root & Marshall purchased the building of the Rochester firm and took possession April 1, 1870. At the death of Thomas L. Root, his son, Addison L., took his father's place, but the firm was dissolved a few years later, Mr. Marshall retiring. George F. Barron then became a partner of Mr. Root and the sign then read "Root & Barron." The stock of hard"vare was closed out in 1894 and Charles J. Washburn was taken in as a partner and business was resumed until 1899, when Mr. Root retired from business as a Main Street merchant. Johnson & Rogers purchased the store and all real estate connected with the same and moved their stock of goods from the small store across the alley into their new location.

Upon the death of Mr. Rogers the firm became Johnson & Congdon. At the death of Mr. Johnson, which occurred October 11, 1924, Mr. Congdon continued in the business, having purchased his partner's interest. The heirs retained the real property.

Our next store on the west is where in the early 40's, Agustus Elmendorf kept a dry goods store. In the years of 1849-51, while an official of the village, a bounty was offered by the town for the killing of crows and to Mr. Elmendorf, evidence of the fact was produced in the shape of crows'




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bills. During the season of slaughter, hundreds, perhaps thousands of bills were swept from the floor of the store into the alley in the rear. Later Crookston & Smith had a hat and cap store here. In the late 70's, Alfred Sansbury became owner of the store and carried on the furniture business, followed by Drake & Johnson, then Winston & Crandall. A good many have occupied the store since. In 1905 Ryan & Bonte had a clothing store here. For a number of years it has been owned and occupied by the Empire Gas & Electric Company, who bought from the Sansbury heirs.

Our next store as we pass on, in the early 30's was that of Messrs. Zull & White. A little later this store was occupied by Joseph C. Lovett, one of Wayne County's most prominent merchants, who was born in Williamstown, Mass., December 15, 1812. When but one year old, his parents removed to western New York and settled in Tyron, Steuben County, where his early boyhood was passed assisting his father in the summer time in clearing up and cultivating his new farm and attending the rude common schools of that period, during the winter months. At the early age of fourteen he had left his parental roof forever to devote himself to mercantile pursuits which he had chosen as the business of his life. He came to Palmyra and entered as clerk in the dry goods store of the above named firm where he remained for several years. He subsequently became a junior member of the firm of Hyde & Lovett, during which time, in 1838, he was married to Miss Electa A., daughter of Joel C. Thayer of Buffalo, N. Y., by Rev. C. S. Hawks of that city.

For forty-six years Mr. Lovett was prominently identified with the mercantile interests of Palmyra and he contributed very largely to the material wealth of the village and its importance as a business point, as one of the firm of Hyde & Lovett, Lovett & Scotten, and in the later years of his life to the business house of J. C. Lovett. He was well and personally known in the commercial world, a man of culture and refinement. David S. Aldrich, who was a native of Massachusetts, came to Palmyra in the 20's, when sixteen years old. He carried the mail on horseback from Palmyra to Pultneyville. Later he clerked at one time for Lovett & Havens and for Sexton & Butterfield. About 1850 J. C. Lovett bought the brick block adjoining on the west, called the "Lovett Block," and moved into one of the stores.

Mr. Aldrich purchased the vacant store and started in the dry goods business in his own name, although at one time James Byron Reeves was his partner. Their associations in business were severed in February, 1866, when Mr. Reeves went to Ohio. Mr. Aldrich continued in the business, later retiring to the homestead on West Main Street, where he conducted his large farm. He still retained the store until his death which occurred in 1882, when the store came into the possession of Pliny T. Sexton. Since the retirement of Mr. Aldrich a good many different ones have had the store. Among some of them were Riley S. Eddy, Lebrecht & Jones, a grocery store for a time. Later Clifford Crandall, a furniture store, and after his death his son, Harold Crandall, and Thomas McGuire, who now carry on the same business.




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Our next business place on the west has been a boot and shoe store for nearly ninety years. Here Robert W. Smith started in business. Later the store was conducted by Jessup & Foster. Then Joel Foster & Company were here, which partnership was dissolved about February 1, 1865, when the firm name became Foster & Smith, which existed for a number of years.

After the death of James H. Smith the other member of this firm became the sole proprietor. Entering this same store when a boy of fourteen as a clerk, Mr. Foster continued in the business until his death which occurred in 1918, he being 83 years old. Mr. Foster had outlived every business man on the street who became a merchant at the time he came to Palmyra. He had been in this same store for nearly seventy years. After Mr. Foster's death, his three daughters continued the business which they still conduct.

For several years after Mr. Foster came into the store the goods which were retailed to the customers were made in the second story. The late Giles Crandall was at one time a cutter there. Later James H. Smith was the cutter and did all that kind of work as long as he was in the store. For many years they bought hides.

Here at this store the writer, in his younger days, bought his boots. The measure was taken and they were ordered made straight, changing them each day. The boot that was worn on my right foot today would be worn on my left tomorrow. By so doing they did not run over on one side. This I did for economy's sake. Every well-regulated family had a grease-dish with mutton tallow, beeswax and lampblack, all melted together. This would turn the water fairly well. Nobody wore rubber boots in those days.

The managers of this store from its beginning to the present time were all related in some way, thus making it seem like the old original store.

Warren R. Smith, a son of Robert M. Smith, and a nephew of James Smith, was a partner of Mrl> Foster for a short time. He withdrew from the firm to accept a responsible position in the First National Bank of Palmyra.

On this same site, as early as 1810, long before the Brown block was built, Nathan Thayer had a wooden store. He was succeeded by his brothers, Joel and Levi. The latter's dwelling was just east and in the rear of where the Brown block is now. But when the block was built he moved away and the house became a tenant house until in the early 60's.

We have now passed through on the lower floor of the Brown block. We have called upon a good many of the earlier merchants as well as those of more recent date.

A good many of the occupants have passed away and are forgotten while others are remembered only by few. A little later we will return and visit some of those on the upper floor.

Bearing this in mind we will continue our journey. The brick block adjoining on the west, for many years was called "Exchange Row". This




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name was painted in large letters just under the upper story window running the whole length of the block, but these letters have long become obliterated. In 1832 Daniel Finch had a dry goods store which was bounded on the east by the Brown block. This store, for a good many years, was called the Rogers store. There for several years, Carlton H. Rogers, son of the late General Thomas Rogers, kept a dry goods store. He came into this store as a merchant in the 40's. Mr. Rogers retired from business in the early 50's, followed by Barnett Johnston. In the early 60's Mr. Johnston sold out and moved away, Mr. Rogers still owning the real property. After Mr. Johnston came Terry & Phettiplace, who came from Farmington and fitted up the store to do a thriving business in groceries and clothing of which they had an abundance. The sliding chests under the counter and the green glass in the floor to light the cellar were put in by them. After doing business here for a while, the business was closed out and Barnett Davis moved from the corner of Clinton and Canal Streets to this store, and the former occupants went back to Farmington, where they died a few years later. The Davis store kept drugs and groceries. After being here a few years, Julius Cleveland became a partner and in this line did a thriving business. Mr. Davis was a staunch Republican and at one time very prominent in the Republican party. He served two terms as Member of Assembly. At length Mr. Davis became old and his partner Mr. Cleveland had died. The business' passed into the hands of Henry Runterman, a clerk, who had been with the firm from boyhood.

One time when Mr. Davis was in New York, he came across this young German, who was a mere boy, yet in his teens, and could not speak a word of English, brought him home where he was engaged as a clerk. After the death of Mr. Cleveland and the retirement of Mr. Davis, he bought the stock of goods and is now doing business in the same store he went into as a clerk nearly thirty years ago.

After the death of Mr. Sexton the store came into the market. Mr. Runterman bought the property and today is one of our leading grocerymen as well as a very highly respected citizen and church worker.

Mr. Cleveland died about 1910 and Mr. Davis, after retiring from business, went to Montclair, New Jersey, to live with his daughter, where he died a short time after. The old store still retains its appearance of long ago.

In our next store, adjoining on the west, in the 40's, R. G. Pardee had a general store as was the custom in those days to sell groceries as well as dry goods.

Mr. Pardee became very much interested in the growing of strawberries. In those days cultivated strawberries were a new thing, but wild strawberries were plentiful in their season, therefore the few he grew in his garden were to some a curiosity for they were much larger than the wild ones. He left Palmyra in the early 50's. Shortly after Mr. Pardee moved away J. C. Lovett purchased this store, also the two stores on the




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west as far as the alley, making three stores. For a long time these three stores were called the "Lovett Block."

S. C. Alles succeeded Mr. Pardee and kept a dry goods store here. In the early 60's he sold out and went away, followed by H. P. Knowles & Co., who had a banking office here. In the rear of the bank office was the Express Office which existed contemporary with the banking business. He also bought grain. Mr. Knowles was a Major in the Civil War and a member of the G. A. R. Post. He died in the 90's and the business was closed out. After the death of Mr. Lovett, P. T. Sexton became owner of the entire Lovett block and this store was opened up by Mr. Sexton as a rest room and went by the name "Forum." Mr. Sexton furnished heat and light, papers and magazines, etc., for all who wished to avail themselves of this opportunity. This practice he kept up for several years at his own expense. The store is now owned by J. W. Thomas.

We now come to the J. C. Lovett store where he moved after leaving the Aldrich store, as mentioned before. Mr. Lovett was the first merchant in town to put rest seats in front of the counter to accommodate customers. During his business career he had employed a good many clerks. Among them were William H. Farnham, a native of Walworth, Rice from Marion and Alfred Sansbury.

It was in this store in 1844 that Pliny Sexton started the Palmyra Bank. After Mr. Lovett's death then came to Palmyra from Seneca Falls Mosher M. Story, who opened up a dry goods store in the same place. He was a natural merchant and began to prosper from the start. As time passed on and business increased, he was obliged to build an annex in the rear, and at the first opportunity he rented the store on the west of P. T. Sexton, who then owned the entire Exchange Row, and by throwing the two stores together made one large store. After a successful career of practically thirty years the death of Mr. Story resulted in a change in the I.; business.

A partnership or corporation was formed, the individuals entering into the same being of the most part foriner employees in the business. In 1925 the company purchased the double store of the Sexton estate. Until his death, P. T. Sexton owned the entire Exchange Row.

As we resume our journey west we come to the fourth and last store in Exchange Row. Previous to the occupancy of the M. Story Dry Goods Company, away back in the 40's, Charles E. Wilder had a hardware store here for several years, when he sold out and moved away, and for a good many years the name of "C. E. Wilder Hardware Store" could be seen painted in large letters on the outside wall at the west end near the top of the building. After Mr. Wilder came Sexton & Chase, who were in the same business previous to coming here. Mr. Chase had had a hardware store in the east end of where the Union Club room is. Mr. Chase commenced business here in 1848.

After the death of Mr. Sexton (who was a son of the late Pliny Sexton) the firm name of Sexton & Chase became L. M. Chase Hardware Store. Mr. Chase had been a hardware merchant nearly twenty years. He had his tin




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shop in the upper stores of the block. The late Garry West was foreman of the shop. Here, too, the late Robert Martin Smith learned his trade as tinsmith and worked at it until his entry into the service of his country at the breaking out of the Rebellion.

Mr. West also enlisted and after the period of conflict had ended both of these young men returned. Mr. West later moved to Canandaigua, engaging in the plumbing business.

A few years previous to his death he came back to Palmyra to live, bought a home on Vienna Street and lived there until the death of his wife, when he went to the Powers Hotel to live, later making his home in Fairport, where he ended his days.

Robert M. Smith soon after returning from the war, entered into the employ of the First National Bank of Palmyra, where he spent the rest of his life. He died January 10, 1925.

In January, 1866, Luther M. Chase sold out his interest in the store to William Doran, better known as "Billy" Doran. He then moved to Wilkes-Barre, Pa., where he engaged in the lumber business, dying twelve years later. Mr. Chase was a son of the late Willard Chase and brother of Clark Chase of whom mention has been made before. Mr. Doran continued the business a little less than a year when he sold out his interest to Orleens W. Dey and William Doolittle. These young men came from Livonia and the firm name became Dey & Doolittle. They took possession in December, 1868. Doran then purchased the old store at the corner of Canal and Market Streets. Mr. Doran came to Palmyra before the Erie Canal was finished. He was a native of Ireland and died in Palmyra in November, 1876, being over 80 years old. Messrs. Dey and Doolittle dissolved partnership in April, 1870. Mr. Doolittle continued in the business with a partner in the person of J. P. Briggs. The firm later became Briggs & Co., with Willard Price as tinner, succeeding Mr. Wheeler, who went West. In a short time the store was sold to Newton & Irish, or Newton & Short, or at least the stock of hardware was transferred. Later, C. H. and E. D. Brigham with George F. Royce purchased the stock and opened a new store at the corner of Main and Market Streets, as mentioned before. After the use of the Chase store for many years as a hardware store another changing of ownership came.

James Johnson opened up a newsstand for awhile, for it is recorded that in March, 1889, the late Mosher ThL Story leased the store in the west end of the Lovett Block.

Among the old clerks that formed a part of the M. Story Dry Goods Company were Frank Hutchins, son-in-law, who died several years ago. George S. Trull and Fred Shoal, who later sold out his interest and moved to Rochester. Later, Samuel Newman, who had been a clerk in the Farnham store several years, became a member of the firm.

Thus these young men trained in the school of honesty and fair dealing have won the confidence and respect of the community in which they live and the business house of the Story Dry Goods Company is well and personally known in the commercial world.




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We have now completed our journey on the first floor of the Brown Block and Exchange Row. On our journey through these two blocks we have mingled with the past and present. We have called on some of the old-time merchants who burned wood to warm their stores and burned fish-oil to light them; who kept a general store and sold groceries as well as dry goods. Their molasses came in hogsheads and crockery came in withed crates, a thing we do not see today. Many times they took dried apples that were dried on a string in exchange for goods. These apples while in process of drying furnished a night's lodging for many a fly during the drying season, but a little scalding water applied just before using would restore them to a palatable and healthy sauce.

As we step outside we notice the west store in the Brown block, which is the Foster store, and the last store in Exchange Row, which is the Runterman store, have higher floors than the rest of the stores in the two blocks. When these two blocks were built nearly 100 years ago, the lower floors were up the same height as the Runterman and Foster stores. About fifty years ago the late George Williams, who was a contractor and builder, as before mentioned, lowered all the floors in these two blocks except the two mentioned. Some of them had wooden platforms in front while others had stone steps. The walk in front of the store was either dirt or gravel and in the Spring and Fall would be quite muddy.

Let us now visit some of the upper rooms. We have already made mention of the L. M. Chase tin shop on the second floor. It was on the third floor of this building and over the tin shop that Major John Gilbert set the type for the first edition of the Mormon Bible, while the second edition was printed in the Clemons block, as before mentioned.

In the center of this block is a stairway leading to the different rooms and floors. The first on the right was for a good many years the office of the late Dr. 'V. J. Hennessy, who came from Perinton to Palmyra when a young man and studied medicine with the late Dr. Kingman. Dr. Hennessy married Minnie, daughter of J. C. Lovett, and went to Kansas, later returning to Palmyra where his wife died. For his second wife he took Mary Birdsall Blodgett, daughter of Henry and Charlotte Birdsall. He opened an office in this room and built up a large practice. Contemporary with this business he became financially interested in the Crandall Packing Company, of which he was president at the time of his death, which occurred about 1917.

At our right and in the third story we find the photograph gallery of George M. Elton. Mr. Elton was born in Toronto, Canada. His great grandfather was in the Revolutionary War. His grandfather was in the War of 1812 and his father was in the Civil War, in which he lost his life while in the battle of Gettysburg.

Mr. Elton lived on a farm until he was thirteen years old, when he came from CanandaIgua to Palmyra In March, 1861.

A Mr. Vail at that time was in the photograph business, and being a clever man, this boy thought he would like to work for him. Accordingly he applied for a job. Mr. Vail thought he was too small,




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but finally consented to give him a trial. A bargain was consummated and the lad started in on his duties. From the start he took to the business and remained in Mr. Vail's employ until 1868, when Mr. Vail took him in as a partner, which continued until 1880, when Mr. Elton bought out Mr. Vail's interest and the latter moved to Geneva.

Mr. Elton continued in the business and occupied the same gallery for more than 55 years and won ten medals in national and international contests.

After the death of Lucius Foster, Mr. Elton was the oldest man continuing in the same business and occupying the same location in the village. He died November 15, 1927, at the age of 79 years.

There are others who have been in the photograph business in years gone by. Among them were Thomas Stead, who sold out to Vail, A. P. Little, Richard Atkinson and Alfred C. Hopkins. The latter was born in East Dean, England, and came to this country on February 22, 1851. At the age of eleven years he started to learn the photograph business in Utica.

In 1877 he came to Palmyra, bought out Richard Atkinson, who was in the photograph business in the Brown Block, and for fifty years occupied the same gallery. Contemporary with this business he has been overseer of the poor for the Town of Palmyra, occupying the office continuously and in a creditable manner for a good many years, as his record will show. About 1927 he retired from the photograph business and is still living in our community. On February 3, 1929, he returned to his native country, England, for a visit.

Thus from youth to old age those two old business men in our village made their daily rounds up and down the stairs.

Many an infant has been brought here in its mother's arms to have its picture taken, returning from time to time until they, too, became old men and women. To these galleries thousands of young men and maidens have come to have an exact facsimile of the original to send to their lover. Thousands of middle-aged men and women have come to have their picture taken to send away to some friend. Old men and women with hoary hair and abated breath have climbed these stairs for the last time to get something to leave to their children that in after years they could see how father and mother used to look.

Their long experience and knowledge of the business and their courteous and obliging manner won for them many friends.

At our right at the top of the stairs was the office of the Palmyra I Courier. Edward S. Averill came to Palmyra in 1854 and bought out the Courier.

We notice that the stairway in Exchange Rowand in the Brown Block are in the center of the building, leaving two stores on each side of the stairway in each block. It was up this stairway in the Brown block that the shoemakers came to get to their work. Those who worked for Jessup & Foster took the alley at the left in the rear of A. C. Hopkins' picture gallery and those who worked for Anderson took the alley at the right in the rear of the Courier office.




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At the time this block was built it was so planned for the accommodation of the stores on the lower floor that the workmen would not have to pass through in going to and from their work.

Let us now resume our journey west, passing the little alley which we will have something to say about later on. In the rear of this alley in the early 40's was the lumber yard of Southwick & Thurber. In the 50's they dissolved partnership. On this same site about 1905 Richard Hoff had a hitch barn. Later he erected a very large barn covered with galvanized iron. He also carried on the livery business, but with the coming of the trolley and automobile the business began to wane. He sold the property about 1918 to the Bird & Flynn Company for $6,000. The building was then used to store agricultural implements. About 1920 the building was partially destroyed by fire. A portion of it was rebuilt and is now owned and occupied by the same company.

When we arrive at the alley we are at the west end of Exchange Row. On the west adjoining the alley we come to William H. Cuyler's hat and fur store. Mr. Cuyler started the store in the 40's and at one time he had the post office in this store. He retired in the late 60's. This store was one of the old type with box windows projecting out in front. There were stairs on the outside leading to the office of Dr. May. How many are there living now who remember seeing him coming down these stairs from his office on a bitter cold day wrapped in a buffalo overcoat and with a well-filled saddle bag on his arm, in which he had castor oil, blue pills and jalap, to take a long ride in the country after the little fleet-footed grey mare?

The next store on the west was the Truman Hemmingway drug store. His advertisement read: "T. Hemmingway's Drug Store. Sign Golden Mortar."

The Golden Mortar was on a high post near the curb. This old-time store, like its neighbor, had a flight of stairs on the outside leading to the upper story. Sometimes this was used as a billiard room. In the early 60's Mr. Hemmingway became old and retired from business. He was succeeded by a young man by the name of Wilcox and later followed by Oak Sylvester, who bought out the store and carried on the business) for a few years.

We now come to another old landmark. In the 40's Franklin Lakey occupied this store. Here he bought grain, pork, skeep skins and wool. About 1849 a Mr. Wiles had a clothing store here for awhile, then moved across the street. Later he went to Rochester where he kept a wholesale clothing store.

The late Henry Flowers at one time occupied this store. He also bought wool, pork, etc. On the west was still another old landmark. In the 40's it was occupied by William Walton who bought pork and kept groceries. For awhile Thomas Bussey was his clerk.

In the 50's C. J. Ferrin occupied the store. He bought wool and sheep skins and also sold flour and salt. At this store a cheap shed extended over the walk to the curb, where barrels of salt were piled up near the curb. He was assisted by William Thayer, who had two sons, William and Amasa. The latter was rather inclined to be unruly and sometimes tried the old




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man's patience, who was very lame and corpulent. Amasa could easily keep out of the old man's way, but would occasionally forget himself and get within the reach of the old man's cane. Then all back dividends were paid.

Mr. Thayer and his two sons boarded with Mrs. Gilbert Oliver, who kept a boarding house in the Rannie Block across the way.

In the early 60's Mr. Ferrin went out of the business and left the oldstore to someone else.

But the time at last came when this row of old wooden buildings, landmarks of a former generation, were to be torn down or moved away to make room for a more modern and attractive brick block.

George W. Cuyler owned this row of old buildings and in 1870 the present new building was erected on the site, which extended from the east side of the Walton Block east to the west side of the alley. The two old stores on the west were torn down, while the Cuyler and Hemmingway stores were moved around the corner on Williams Street and became the property of P. T. Sexton. The Hemmingway store stood on the east side of the street and was used as a storehouse. It was, however, shorn somewhat of its former appearance. The old box windows were renloved, the old outside stairs were pretty well dilapidated, but if we took a look on the inside we could have seen the old drawers in which different kinds of herbs were kept.

In plain sight across the way was its old neighbor, the Cuyler store, which was of more recent date, looking very much as it did in days gone by, with its box windows and outside stairs. This, a better building, received better care and was used as a carpenter shop by· Mr. Sexton. These buildings were torn down about 1926.

In April, 1869, the foundation for the Cuyler Block was laid and nearly a year was consumed before its completion.

Of this perhaps a little of its early history might be mentioned. The third story was planned especially for the use of Palmyra Lodge, No. 248, F. & A. M. The second story contained several offices and the lower floor was arranged for four separate stores.

Palmyra Lodge took possession on May 6, 1870, and has, without interruption, been the tenant ever since.

The Lodge dedicated the hall on June 9, 1870, with a ceremony. A public parade was held, the line of march following the usual routine, i. e., Masonic fIall to Washington Street, to Jackson, to Canandaigua, to Main, to Cuyler, to Jackson, to Fayette, to Main, to Eagle Hotel, where the procession countermarched, returning to the hall.

A part of the second story of the block was used as a storage room for merchandise belonging to tenants of the stores below. The rooms thus utilized were later vacated and offices fitted up for prospective tenants. For several years the west office was occupied by Justice S. Nelson Sawyer, either alone or as a practicing attorney, or as a county official or in partnership with David Aldrich or with George S. Tinklepaugh, which partnership was dissolved when Mr. Sawyer was elected County Judge. Then Mr.




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Tinklepaugh moved to the adjoining office in the rear of that occupied by Judge McLouth from the time the block was completed until his death.

Justice Sawyer and Mr. Tinklepaugh remained until they became tenants in the Davis Block where they are still located. For several years Mr. N. R. Gardner maintained an apartment over the store he occupied while the office between his room and the office of Judge McLouth was occupied by the late Samuel R. McIntyre, who became an occupant as soon as the block was completed. After the death of Mr. McIntyre the office was occupied for a brief time by Charles W. Hurlbut, who later went to New York where his death occurred a few years later. Frederick E. Converse then became the tenant. About 1915 his son Ray became a partner and the firm now became Converse & Converse. All those mentioned above were lawyers except Mr. Gardner. In 1923 the Converse firm moved to the Walton block on the west. Charles McLouth, jr., occupied, for a time, the same office his father did. Later he moved his office to Rochester.

In 1925 the Masons became a tenant of a part of the second floor where they have a library, an armory and a cloak room, the latter for the accommodation of the ladies whenever they have entertainments.

Commencing at the east store in the Cuyler Block: In January, 1871, the late John W. Corning became its first tenant and opened up a grocery store. This store had stood vacant for nearly a year. After a few years he was followed by Norton R. Gardner and his brother Wright Gardner who kept a drug store. In 1885 Wright Gardner retired and went to California where he died. N. R. Gardner then became the sole owner. His retirement after 22 years was a source of regret to his many friends. Mrs. Lord had a millinery store in one of these stores, being one of the first tenants. In the next store Clark S. Chase was the first occupant. Mosher M. Story was the next occupant, conducting the "Boston Clothing Store." For a few years William H. Rogers, a son-in-law, was manager. Later Lebrecht & Jones had a clothing store, and in 1921 Lebrecht withdrew and it became Jones Brothers.

Now for a moment let us return to Leach & Tuttle in Exchange Row. When the Cuyler Block was completed Leach & Tuttle moved to the third store in the Cuyler Block and M. Story, who was in the old Lovett store, wanted more room and rented the Leach & Tuttle store in Exchange Row. He tore out the partition and put the two stores into one. In the Cuyler Block Leach & Tuttle was followed by Tuttle, then Tuttle & Williamson, followed by Thomas. In 1922 Thomas moved to Exchange Row, as mentioned before.

The store Thomas vacated is now occupied by George Brandetsas. In the store on the west, among its first tenants, was William H. Cronise, followed by H. G. Critchell, Reed & PeLee, who left about 1891, then Wells & Beatty, Glen H. Reeves and Simon xxx~onte.

After Mr. Lebrecht sold out to Jones in 1921, he bought out Bonte. Now Lebrecht & Son are occupying the store as a clothing store. Let us for a moment inquire what became of the little alley between

the old Cuyler store and L. M. Chase, that we have spoken of before. This




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alley was still open when the Cuyler Block was completed and for two years or until 1872. On April 18 of that year Mr. Cuyler bought of Joseph Lovett the driveway between his block and the Lovett store. Here he erected the brick building, now occupied by S. E. Braman's insurance office. Mr. Braman came here from the Rannie building across the way. Among some of the earlier tenants in the little store were Thomas Birdsall's cigar store in 1886, followed by David "Lyon who had a paint shop, coming from the Jarvis block across the way. Also one time the Gas Company occupied it.

Although the Jarvis block was built in 1876, and is of more recent construction than the Cuyler block by six years, the erection of the latter building made the most pronounced change in the business of the north side of the street. Since the coming of the trolley the Jarvis plock has always been occupied.

Speaking of the Cuyler block: The title to this block at the death of its founder, George W. Cuyler, passed to his widow, Caroline Cuyler. At her death division of her property resulted in the passing of this property to a grandson, Cuyler C. Hunt.

Adjoining the Cuyler block on the west is the Walton block, erected in the 30's by George W. Cuyler, who owned the property from the corner to the east line of the Cuyler block and north to the Pickett lot, including the Allen foundry. When Mr. Cuyler first built the block he kept a hardware store here and for many years after one could see traces of the lettering of the old sign on the west end of the building which read, "George W. Cuyler's Hardware Store. Oils, Paint."

In 1849 or 50, William Walton purchased this block and kept a grocery store and meat market. He was also an extensive buyer of pork which he salted down and smoked the hams. In 1856 Morgan Bingham was his clerk.

While on our journey along on this side of the street, we noticed outside stairs on a good many of the old wooden buildings and we find this brick block no exception to the rule. The stairs to this block were on the west side and obstructed the street, which annoyed some people.

On the Fourth of July bonfires were the custom for midnight entertainment. But one of the Trustees of the village thought the stairs had been there long enough and told one of the boys if they tore down those old stairs they must do it while he was not looking and if caught they would suffer the penalty of law. Of course, this was all the hint they wanted and when morning came no stairs were to be seen and were never replaced.

How many of the inhabitants remember seeing Mr. Walton's old sorrel horse in the summer time, standing in front of the store, while the old dog was enjoying a nap on the seat? When the old horse became thirsty he would back out and leisurely walk down to the lower end of Main Street to the watering trough as before mentioned, with no one to guide him but the old dog that sat upon the seat enjoying the ride.

At Mr. Walton's death the block c.ame into the hands of his son




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Charles, who had a meat market here for a time. At his death the property passed to his wife and daughter. After the deaths of Charles Walton's wife and daughter, the heirs sold the block to the State Bank and in 1930, Spencer L. Knapp, the insurance man, and Fred D. Guile, the real estate broker, purchased the block and are now occupying the lower floor. The front part of the upper floor, is occupied by Converse & Converse, attorneys, and the back part by Dr. McCarthy, a chiropractor.

About 1906 William Darling, who conducted a meat market where the trolley station now stands, moved to the Walton block, doing the same business until 1922, when a new State Bank was projected. The Walton block seemed to appeal to the stockholders as an ideal location for the new bank. A long time lease was procured, the building was enlarged and remodeled, up-to-date equipment for a country bank was installed and the charter secured in January, 1922. The bank opened August 19, 1922, with the following named officers: John W. Walton, President; Arthur T. Jones and W. Ray Converse, Vice-presidents; Clitrord G. Adams, Cashier; Sanford M. Young, Assistant Cashier.

Let us now take a stroll down Williams Street. After leaving the corner, going north, we come to the John Rifenberg saloon, erected by him about 1898 and is now owned and occupied by his heirs; also the building on the north is still in the hands of the heirs. This building in the very early 50's was owned by Samuel Palmer, who used it for a paint shop. Mr. Palmer took contracts and employed a good many men. When Mr. Darling left the Walton store he moved his market to this building where he is still located.

Our next is a house owned by Ward K. Angevine.

Somewhere in here, in ye olden times stood a little fire engine house long since disappeared and forgotten. The old Hemingway store was moved here but now is torn down, while across the way the V. H. Cuyler store was moved. In 1925 both buildings were torn down, thus wiping out all the old stores where now stands the Cuyler block.

Next north of the Angevine house is a little building used as a photograph gallery, called the Hooper Studio.

Below the Hemingway store the' Jackman Brothers built a brick laundry, on the site of the old Samuel Sawyer carpenter shop. After doing a good business for several years, they merged with a Newark company. The building is now owned and occupied by The Palmyra Courier Company, Inc., publishers of The Palmyra Courier-Journal.

Our next is the old Allen Scale factory. Here in the early 50's, besides making scales, he also made plows and cultivators and kept an all-around hit-and-miss store. His scales were very accurate. He also built the house on the north in which he lived. In 1856 he built the five little houses across the way, now owned by J. K. Williamson's estate. In 1924 these were covered with stucco. He died about 1900. A short time after his death Roy Barrett purchased the property and kept a hardware store and also did plumbing. After his death, which occurred in 1924, the stock was sold to Harry Williamson, who continued in the same business.




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Mr. Barrett left one daughter, his wife dying several years ago. The daughter retained the store and the dwelling on the north. The store eventually passed to Powers & Sons, the present owners, who have an indoor golf course here now. The house is still owned by the daughter.

Still a little further at the north, until in the 70's stood an old twostory house, in the early 50's owned and occupied by William Pickett. About 1910 Jacob Hartman bought the property and tore down the old house and erected two new houses.

This street was laid out February 10, 1830, and to be three rods wide. Resurveyed June 22, 1837.

Let us now return to the corner of Main and Fayette Streets. Away back when the first church was built in the village, a log house was built that was used for a parsonage for awhile. Later Stephen Phelps bought of James Galloway this same site and erected a two-story frame house in which he lived. This house he opened up for a tavern. In 1820 he sold out and went to Illinois. This house was rebuilt and enlarged to a three-story structure in 1824 and called the Eagle Hotel. It was reputed a fine house and the patronage correspondingly extensive. The following were the names of some of the landlords: Horace Warner, who married a daughter of Mr. Phelps, Alexander Galloway, William Rogers, jr., Lovell Hurd and Solmon St. John.

A new hotel had been projected and a stock company was formed in 1836 of which the following are the names of the stockholders: Henry Jessup, Abner Lakey, General Thomas Rogers, James Jenner, W. W. Nottingham, Burros Butler, Abraham Martin, S. T. Horton, H. K. Jerome, Alanson Sherman, A. P. Crandall, A. C. Jackson, George Beckwith, Pliny Sexton, Stephen Hyde, Truman Hemingway and J. C. Lovett. Cost $12,000.

In 1836 the old building was removed to make way for the present three-story hotel which was built in 1836 and 1837. William Nottingham, coming from the Bunker Hill Hotel on Canal Street, was its first landlord. In 1838 Mr. Nottingham purchased the property known as Palmyra Hotel, and it was known for years throughout the length of the state as Nottingham's Hotel. His name and fame as host was well spread. After serving the public in this hotel for nearly thirty years he sold out in 1865 and retired to private life.

Among successive landlords were Messrs. Cleveland & Gates, Joseph E. Cochron, C. B. Stewart, Delos Cummings, Robert Hale, William Andrew Powers. When the latter came into possession of the hotel the name was changed to Powers Hotel. After living here a good many years, about 1912, he sold out and went to California, where he died in 1924. Other landlords followed on.

This old hotel with its massive columns and surmounting dome and dignified and stately appearance bears a semi-courtly and venerable aspect. The exterior of the building has recently been changed.

This fine old land mark has made a kindly impression with all who have entered its portals to tarry over night or to be served at its table.




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How many are there living that can recall the time when they kept step with the music when Major Gilbert called out "Balance your partner," in the third story, dancing on the springing floor in the then fashionable ball room?

Long years have passed since then and many have been the changes and many of those young people left Palmyra to go out and battle with the world. And when nearing the sunset of life, wandered back to old Palmyra only to learn that the old friends whom they expected to see had vanished from sight and passed from memory, and, while yet pondering upon the fact, the most familiar thing that greeted their eyes was the old Palmyra Hotel. Here on the old veranda they loved to linger while in town, recalling the past and watching the people as they passed by. But they look in vain to see some familiar face or to hear an accustomed voice. As they look down Fayette Street they look in vain to see the hotel barns, only to learn that long ago they were burned and on its site cottages have been built and strangers are occupying them. Daniel Gates and Freeman Thompson, his partner, who kept a livery stable on the east side of Fayette Street, were familiar faces around the hotel. They learn that they, too, have passed away.

They wait in vain for the arrival of the Rochester four-horse stage coach. Yes, they remember well when there was an opposition line and how great and exciting was the strife between the rivals. Oh, yes they recall the time when Mahlon Kinman shouted out, "Get there first Ben, if you kill every horse on the team," meaning Benjamin Langdon who was an old stage driver and father to Alonzo Langdon.

Or perhaps later when the New York Central was first built, when Morris Huxley, "Old Dad" as he was called, drove the first omnibus to the depot, just before train time he would call out, "All aboard." Many a time when on his way to the depot and he saw a man going along toward the depot with a satchel he would whip up his team as though in a great hurry. He would then call out to the man, "Say, do you want to get that train?" Generally the man would say yes. "Then get right in here if you don't want to get left," and thus secure another passenger.

All these and many more would come thronging back upon his memory, but in memory only. Those scenes and personages cannot be viewed only by the glimmering light of the past.

The time at last came when in 1928 this old building was to undergo a change. It was then in the hands of the heirs of the late Pliny T. Sexton when it was sold. The lower floor was converted into two up-to-date stores, the east one being occupied by an A & P store and the west one having been leased to E. R. Smith, just here from Rochester, to be used as a drug store. The rest of the old hotel is being used as a hotel.

Leaving the hotel and passing westward, we find the land between the hotel and Cuyler Street is divided into two lots, Joseph Colt owning. the east lot as far west as the Jarvis block and Theodatus Sawyer, a brotherin-law of Swift owning on west to Cuyler Street. Then later Sawyer sold




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to Constant Southworth who in 1806, sold to William Howe Cuyler, from whom the street was named.

Just west of the hotel Stephen Phelps and Ira Silby occupied a long wooden building, side to the street. The upper story was used to store wheat and corn. The weight burst the frame apart and precipitated the grain to the room below to the great discomfort of the owners. On the west was the dwelling of Joseph Colt, a large flat-roofed structure. Later this became the property of Nataniel Beckwith: also the Phelps and Silby lot on the east to make room for the present brick block. Wells Anderson, a native of East Haddon, Conn., married Dolly, the tenth child of Samuel and Hannah Beckwith. He came to Palmyra at an early date, occupied and became owner of the east store, now owned and occupied by D. W. Briggs as a drug store. Here he opened up a boot and shoe store about 1820. He was a tanner by trade. He built a tannery in the rear, the south end being over the brook. The leather was made into boots and shoes in the back end of the second story of the block where he employed a number of men.

The entrance to the tannery was through a driveway between the store and hotel. The little house in the rear he built in 1846. The old tannery was built in 1820 and torn down in the 40's. The old frame part we see on the back of the store was rented to families.

Miss Williams kept a select school in the front of the second story for several years.

When she gave up teaching, Dr. Francis Clayton Brown, a native of Walworth came to Palmyra in the early 50's and opened up a dental office in this same room, and after growing old in the businesa he gave up his office and opened up an office at his residence on the corner of Main and Washington Streets. He died about 1910 at an advanced age. The late Augustus Foskett then occupied the down town office where he had a tailor shop. He died in 1914 at the age of 80. Since then different ones have occupied the room, while the back part was rented to families.

Where the line fence was and at the northwest corner of the little house was a deep well that furnished water for the Beckwith family and all tenants in the whole block, but in those days no one was afraid of being killed by drinking water from a well in a congested neighborhood. Mr. Anderson after being in the business a good many years and becoming an old man, in the early 50's retired from business.

The late Dr. J. P. H. Deming purchased the property. The old box windows in front were torn away. Larger and more modern windows were put in; also an iron front making a modern store and the drug store of Dr. J. P. H. Deming was opened up. In the 60's he sold the entire property as well as his house and lot to Dr. Kingman and moved to Shortsville. Dr. Kingman continued in the same business until about 1885, when he died. The doctor also had a large practice.

At the death of Dr. Kingman the store property was sold to the late William Rushmore. For a time the store was occupied by Petitt and




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Briggs, the latter being a son-in-law of Mr. Rushmore. This firm also carried on the drug business.

In the 70's Mr. Rushmore and his SOl1, John, continued in the same business, when the firm of Petitt and Briggs dissolved. After the death of the senior Rushmore, his son John, conducted the store and also owned the property. About 1912 he rented the store to D. W. Briggs who also bought the drug business. In 1923 Mr. Briggs purchased the entire real property once owned by Mr. Anderson, except the site of the tannery. By the removal of the old box windows, and putting in an iron front, the oldtime appearance of the Wells Anderson shoe store has departed.

Adjoining the Anderson store on the west, Franklin Williams, in the 40's, had an up-to-date jewelry store, while on the west in the next store in the 40's, Thomas Douglass, a brother-in-law of Mr. Williams, also kept a jewelry store until late in the 50's, when he sold out and moved away. In the store at the west end of the block, in the 40's, Jacob Crandall had a tailor shop. He left Palmyra about 1850 and moved to Michigan.

Returning to the Williams store: During all this time the three stores on the west of the Anderson store were still in the Nathanial Beckwith estate, until in the 60's, when this property was put upon the market. Mr. Williams bought the three stores and now they are known and designated as the Williams block. As soon as IVfr. Williams had made this purchase, he began to improve the property. New windows and an iron front were put in and on the store he occupied the window sash and the iron front were washed with an imitation of silver that stayed on until covered by a coat of paint put on in 1925 by the late "Pete" Weber, who purchased the property of the P. T. Sexton estate.

In the 70's Mr. Williams moved into the west store, which in the 60's had been occupied by Shultz and O'Dwyer as a dry goods store. Mr. Williams occupied this store until his death in the 80's. At his death this property passed to Pliny T. Sexton.

When Mr. Williams moved from the east store, the late Lyman Lyon, who had a banking office on the second floor, moved to this vacant store, where he carried on the banking business until his death, which occurred in the 80's, when the business was closed out. After the death of Mr. Lyon the place has been occupied by the late "Pete" Weber as a barber store and since his death which occurred October 16, 1930, his son Theodore has carried on the business.

When Mr. Douglass moved away, the store was occupied for a time by Birdsall & Tyler as a clothing store in the 60's. Their advertisement in the local newspapers read: "Birdsall & Tyler's Clothing Store, South Side Main Street. George Howland, our cutter will continue to give our customers fits."

Later Giles B. Crandall occupied this store for a good many years where he carried on the furniture and undertaking business until his death, which occurred about 1905. After Mr. Crandall's death, Silver & Cady bought the Crandall stock and continued in the same business until 1925 when Karl Engel bought the store of the Sexton estate and




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opened up an electric supply store. After Mr. Williams' death, the west store which he occupied as a jewelry store at that time, was occupied by different ones. Among those who occupied it were Charles Brown, a grocery store, and George Girard in the san1e business. In 1899 the King's Daughters opened up a public library in this building and occupied the same until 1924 when they moved to the club rooms near the park.

We have now visited the last store on the lower floor of the entire block, including the Anderson shoe store. Let's return once more and call on some of those who occupied the front rooms in the second story. We have made mention of those in the Anderson block. Just across the alley, over the Williams jewelry store, in the 40's, the late Dr. Alexander McIntyre and his son, DeWitt, had an office. Later Lyman Lyon had his banking office as before mentioned. Here, Edwin North had his dental office for several years. After his death different ones came on. Over the Thomas Douglass store in the 40's, was the law office of James Peddie, a lawyer of the old colonial type. He always wore a ruffled shirt bosom and was quite a noted orator. The Palmyra Grange occupied this room for a time. Silver & Cady now occupy it as a furniture and undertaking room. Across the alley were the rooms for a great many years of the G. A. R., furnished to them free by Mr. Sexton, who owned the building. About 1920, there being only three or four living, they gave up the room. It will be but a short time when all will have answered the roll call. The rooms back of these in the upper story were rented to families, among them being Louis Furney and James Turner, who was a soldier in theWar of 1812.

We now come to the dwelling of Joseph Colt, who lived in a flat-roofed house on the site of the Beckwith house. When this property came into the hands of Nathaniel Beckwith, the old flat-roofed house was moved to the south end of the Anderson store, and a new brick house was erected on the site of the old one. The old house, after being moved, was used for a tenant house. A door opened into the alley and the old oven protruded out from the side of the building. When the property passed to Dr. J. P. H. Deming the doorway was closed, the old oven was taken out and it became a part of the main store.

At the death of Nathaniel Beckwith, he left one son, James, being a minor at the time of the death of his father. The late Durfee Osban of Macedon Center was appointed as his guardian.

In the 40's the late Henry S. Flo"vers lived in this then red house. Later, when James became of age, he came into the possession of this property. He soon married and occupied the house and made very elaborate improvements and repairs. Among some of those on the house were massive colonial columns. It was remodeled inside and out. With plenty of means at his command, he entered into partnership with William H. Farnham in the dry goods and grocery business, occupying the old frame store just west and adjoining the Beckwith property.

But at last reverses came and he soon lost all he had. His wife died and his life of luxury soon changed to one of extreme poverty. He gave up




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the store, he lost his home and tried to get a living by selling oranges, etc., to passing boatmen on the canal as they passed his little row boat. His lodging place was in shops or any place that would afford him shelter from the storm. He continued this for awhile, when at last he left town and a few years later died.

Such was the fate of this well-meaning man. He had no enemies. He was not a dissipated man. He was honest. His beautiful home soon passed into the hands of William P. Nottingham, soon after retiring from the hotel, who after living here awhile sold the property to Calvin Seeley and bought the Briggs farm, west of the village, now known as the Alderman farm. Here he lived until his death, which occurred in the 70's.

Mr. Seeley, besides occupying the house, moved his business from Market Street to a shop in the rear of the dwelling. He built the Seeley block. He did a good business for a good many years, making sleighs and carriages from the rough to the finished product. He hired a good many men. But at last, he, too, became old and died about 1900, at an advanced age. The property went to his daughter, Mrs. Romana Seeley Griswold. In 1914, Smith & Ziegler became the owners of this property by purchase. About 1918 the house was sold to a party in Newark, the owners retaining the rest of the property. In 1920 the time came when this old landmark was to be torn down to make way for an up-to-date garage. Loghery & Chisholm bought the old home, then the destruction hegan. The old house was soon demolished. The cellar was filled and a new garage occupies the whole front and the Nathaniel Beckwith homestead will be remembered only in history.

Our next lot adjoining on the west is the one Swift sold to Theodatus Sawyer, his brother-in-law. Sawyer sold to Constant Southworth, who in 1806 sold to William Howe Cuyler, from whom Cuyler Street is named. Mr. Cuyler was one of the first lawyers to have an office in the village. On this lot he had his office, store and dwelling. After the War of 1812, the sale of the Cuyler estate was very slow until 1830, when about that time William Jarvis came into possession of this entire corner running south to the south side of Odd Fellows' Hall. At the time Mr. Jarvis purchased this property, in front, on Main Street, was a board fence and a row of poplar trees.

From time to time, as business called for it, frame buildings were put up until the whole space was fined with six cheap wooden buildings, besides a driveway leading to the old Cuyler barn. In the rear of these buildings stood the old Cuyler homestead, a long, low frame, New England house.

William II. Farnham when a boy, in the 40's came from Walworth to Palmyra and entered into the employ of J. C. Lovett. He remained here until in the very early 50's, when he entered into partnership with James Beckwith in the mercantile business in the east store of the Jarvis wooden stores. Here they kept a general store as was the custom in those days. They bought dried apples, sometimes being dried on a string. They also kept a crockery and groceries until 1856, when they kept only an up-to-date




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dry goods store. This change was made while in the old store. Mr. Beckwith withdrew from the firm in the 50's and Mr. Farnham bought the Beckwith interest. With his early training in the mercantile business, combined with his natural ability, he made a success of it from the start. When a young man, he boarded with the family of the late William H. Southwick, whose wife was a daughter of the late William H. Chapman, who owned and occupied a farm one-fourth mile north of the Yellow Mills, which we will have pointed out while on our journey through the country.

Mrs. Southwick's sister, Miss Chapman, used to visit her and here she met Mr. Farnham. An affection sprang up between them and they were finally married on February 15, 1854, in Zion Episcopal Church of this village by Rev. George D. Gillespie.

He soon after bought of James Gallup, the house on the corner of Jackson and Canandaigua Streets, where they commenced housekeeping and Mr. Gallup moved to Detroit, Mich. In the upper story of the old wooden store the late George Beckwith, uncle of James Beckwith, had a carpet store which he carried on for several years. When he retired, Mr. Farnham took over the carpet business in connection with his store below. We will now leave the Farnham store for awhile and return later when more will be said of Mr. Farnham.

Immediately after leaving the Farnham store, going west, we cross the alley leading to the old Cuyler barn. On the west side of this alley are all old wooden buildings as far west as Cuyler Street. Our first is a two-story building occupied in the early 50's by Peter Huycke as a tailor shop on the lower floor, while the second story was occupied by a family.

Later George Bortells had a grocery. store here. In the 70's he sold out to George Brown, a Civil War veteran, who carried on the same business until the place was burned, which will be mentioned later.

The next store on the west was rather more conspicuous than its neighbors on either side. It had a veranda with large, high columns and in the gable end the name of "Clark & Scotten" could be seen in a half-circle long after they had gone out of business, which was in the 40's. Mr. Scotten went to Detroit, engaged in the tobacco trade and became very wealthy. Among some of those who occupied the store later, were L. M. Seaman, who at one time ran the Yellow Mills and had a flour and feed store here. Mr. Seaman was a clothier by trade and in the 50's sold woolen cloth to people to be made into suits as was the custom in those days. Edward Smith, the Quaker, bought and took in wool here in the 50's. William Moore had a seed store here besides others who followed on until in the 70's. In the second store, Judge Jerome had a law office at one time and lived on Market Street as mentioned before.

Following along, we come to another two-story building, where in the 50's Mr. Wiles had a clothing store, coming from across the street as mentioned before. Later he sold out his goods to Walter Lapham in the 50's and went to Rochester where he had a wholesale clothing store. Mr. Lapham continued until the 60's when he closed out the business,




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followed by a Mr. Rice, who had a jewelry store until the 70's. Mr. Rice was a bachelor. Over this store, J. W. Corning had a law office. When the Civil War broke out he entered the army as Colonel. He was also in the Mexican War. Mr. Corning was a native of Nova Scotia.

Our next is a little, low, one-story building in which in the 40's the post office was once kept. In the 50's, William Pickett kept a saloon for some time and it was occupied by different ones until the 70's.

Our next building is on the corner. This small building stood upon a high wall. It also had a veranda. One had to climb several steps to reach this shop. In the late 30's, Mr. Jarvis, who owned the entire block, kept a meat market for several years here. Later Lewis Goodell kept a meat market here for a good many years. This little store had a basement, in which saloons were generally kept. Among some of the occupants were James Shirtliff, John Brown and others.

We have now arrived at the corner and have been through all the old wooden buildings on the Jarvis tract. Now let us return once more to the old Farnham store. We look in vain to find it. But we are told that on July 5, 1876, this whole row of old wooden buildings was destroyed by fire, including the old Cuyler homestead. The time for which these buildings were insured had expired only a few days before, making the burning of these buildings a total loss. Undaunted by this calamity, Mr. Jarvis immediately set himself to work planning for a substantial two-story brick block. Mr. Farnham's wishes were considered in erecting a store suitable to his trade. Mr. Farnham accumulated a large fortune and was held in high esteem by those who knew him. He died about 1904. His wife died a few years before. They left one son, William Southwick Farnham, who died about 1912.

At the death of the elder Farnham the Lawrence Brothers succeeded him. Now the store has been enlarged by taking in the store on the west. In 1929 Lawrence Brothers dissolved partnership, Charles retaining the dry goods business and Albert moved the radio trade to the east part of the Farrell barber shop.

As to the rest of the new stores, different ones have occupied them. Among Some of the tenants were L. M. Chase, a grocer, and George Parker, who had a shoe store called "The Four Hundred," Roy Barrett, a hardware, William Parsons, a bakery. Beginning with the Farnham store, now occupied by Charles J. Lawrence & Co., and going on west we find the Western Union Telegraph office, the Market Basket grocery, the Central News Room, Chittenden's Barber Shop and the Coffee Shoppe.

The store on the corner has for many years been occupied by Smith & Ziegler, who keep an up-to-date jewelry store. Over this store Dr. W. H. Marks has had a dental office for over 20 years. Across the hall were the rooms of the telephone company for several years. In the rear of Dr. Mark's office is the law office of Charles Congdon. The Garlock Club rooms were on the second floor. William Parker, a harness maker, had rooms here for a good many years. He was a bachelor. He died about 1915 and was a native of Canada.



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Mr. Jarvis came to Palmyra in the 30's and settled on Canal Street and built the fine brick house as before mentioned. He built and owned the Jarvis block on Market Street which has been pointed out in our journey and also a house on the site of the trolley station, besides owning land and old slaughter houses on the west side of Division Street. Mr. Jarvis was called a shrewd business man and at that time one of the wealthiest men in the village.

At the death of Mr. Jarvis, his daughter, Mrs. Emily Jarvis Mirick, was appointed agent to look after this property. At her death, which occurred in 1920, her daughter, Mrs. Harriett Jarvis Elton, succeeded her mother and is still acting in that capacity.

This completes our journey between Fayette and Cuyler Streets. We find in our journey the changes have been many and varied. We have been amid scenes fraught with strange memories. We have mingled with the past and present. So we leave the glimmering light of history to reveal the rest.

As we journey on and across Cuyler Street, we come to the Alva Hendee store. Mr. Hendee was one of Palmyra's earliest merchants. He married Mary, daughter of David Wilcox, born June 29, 1791, being the first white child born in this town.

David Wilcox lived east of the village on Vienna road, just east of the corner beyond the gravel pit. When the female portion of the Gideon Durfee family were sick, the wife of David Wilcox crossed the creek daily to render assistance. Stephen Durfee, then a small boy, went with her to carry the babe, Mary, the first born female child in the settlement. They crossed the creek upon the trunk of a large basswood tree that had been felled across the stream with a stump so high that boats could pass beneath it.

In 1854, Mrs. Gilbert Oliver kept a boarding house here. In 1856, an Englishman by the name of Ralph bought this property. It was sold later to Alexander Rannie, who came from Scotland and was a baker by trade. A brick addition was put on in the rear and a bakery started and carried on as such for several years by William Smith, who later moved to Canandaigua. Then John Rannie, a brother, became the owner of the property, followed by the late Alexander Grieves, who was also a native of Scotland and a son-in-law and lived in Canandaigua. In the 70's Robert Bareham became the occupant and stayed here until 1925, when a part of the block was sold for a site on which to build a new bank. About 1908 Austin R. Knapp and Miss Agnes Epler bought the property. Later they sold a portion for the bank. Mr. Knapp, being in the insurance business, occupied an office here for a great many years. Some time after his death, his son, Spencer L., purchased the Walton block where he is now located. Previous to Mr. Knapp's occupancy, S. E. Braman had an insurance office here for several years, when he moved across the way as stated before.

Probably it will not be long before this old landmark will be torn down and a new building put on its site. This is considered a good




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location on account of its nearness to the trolley station which now occupies the site where in early days was Pratt's tavern. Later William Jarvis bought the property and it Was used for a tenant house for a good many years. At that time this old house had a picket fence in front with a little gate. In the 70's Joseph Williamson bought the property and enlarged the building by making it into a business place on the lower floor. He rented rooms for offices and families on the upper floor. In the rear of the building Jerry McGrath had a shoe shop for a good many years. In the rear and separate from this building, Mr. Williamson built a small house in which he lived. He also built a little shop where he made bluing, etc. About 1890 he sold this place to his nephew, George D. Williamson, who was in company with Hiram Clark in the insurance business. They occupied the west office and Pratt and Darling occupied the east store for a meat market. Later Clark and Williamson dissolved partnership and Mr. Williamson moved to Batavia. Then the firm became Clark & Knapp. This partnership continued until Mr. Clark's death, caused by a wound received in the Civil War. Then Mr. Knapp carried on the business alone in this office until the Rochester & Syracuse Railroad Company bought the property for a station, when he bought the Rannie Block as stated. Such has been the fate of this old pioneer tavern that has so long been forgotten.

It was in the year 1800 when Solmon Hathaway came from North Adams, Mass., to Palmyra, but his family did not come until 1804. He was a sadler by trade and built a house on the site of the present village Hall. After working at his trade for awhile, he enlarged his house, building on in front with two piazzas, one above the other. He opened it up as a tavern and called it "The Franklin House." This, too, was known as a stage tavern where the stage arrived and departed. This was one of the earliest taverns in the village. At that time steel knives and two-tined steel forks were in use at all times and on all occasions. Everything they had to eat was served on the same plate. Sauce dishes and butter plates were unknown. The same might be said of canned fruit and preserves. Tea was poured into the saucer to cool.

On one occasion during Mr. Hathaway's occupancy of the tavern, a man came along to stay over night. For supper they had some applesauce that, to the stranger, seemed very palatable. After gathering up all he could on the spoon, a very little juice still remained that he could not gather. After looking at the remaining juice, he said, "I swan, that is too good to go into the dish water." So he picks up the plate and licks it off.

After being in the tavern several years, Mr. Hathaway sold out to Kingsley Miller and moved on a farm on Canandaigua Street. The old Hathaway homestead is still standing just north of the little brook. It is now owned and occupied by Charles Sawyer. Mr. Hathaway died in 1843, being the fourth to be buried in the new cemetery, the widow dying fifty-two years later at the age of 95 years. Two grandchildren are living in the village, Mrs. Charlotte Jenner Birdsall, who lives on Cuyler Street,




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and Mrs. Catherine Hathaway Johnson, who lives on Canandaigua Street, adjoining the old homestead.

Mr. Miller, after keeping the tavern awhile, sold out and moved to the Ennis farm east of the Central depot, which will be pointed out while on our journey through the country. But with the decadence of trade the old tavern began to go to decay and was no longer fit for a public house.

In the 40's William Nettiville occupied a portion of the old tavern for a cabinet shop for a time. On holidays for a long time after, the upper veranda was occupied by those who wanted to get a good view of the circus parade and Fourth of July fire works. In the 50's the upper floor was occupied by different families. A family by the name of Porter lived here a long time. The lower floor was occupied by a religious society called Christians. Here they held meetings two or three years. The pastor's name was Burnham, who was held in high esteem by the citizens of the village. He moved away about 1858 and the meetings were discontinued.

But the time at last came in the Fall of 1866, when the old Franklin Tavern was bought of the late Carlton H. Rogers and torn down to make room for the present Village Hall. The contract was let to Elton St. Johns and was completed in January, 1868. The design was of H. M. White of Syracuse. C. H. Rogers and A. P. Crandall were building committee. The whole building is 100 feet long by 58 feet wide. The post office had been located in different parts of the village until in the early 70's when it was permanently located in the Village Hall.

Across the hall and in front of the post office we could see chiseled in a marble tablet, the names of those who in the Civil War, laid down their life in the defense of their country. With reverence we read their names and with solemn thought we pay them homage.

The auditorium is reached by an easy flight of stairs which rises toward the front of the building on each side of the lower hall and rise toward the center, then rise by several broad steps to the floor level. This room is 75x55 feet, twenty foot high with ante rooms and stage. It will comfortably seat 800 persons.

The post office has now been moved to a new location and the building is used for village purposes.

On the site of the Davis block, once stood a small white house, which in the 40's was owned by A. M. Anderson. In 1855, Professor Baldwin of the Palmyra Union School lived here. Later the father of the late George Pettitt owned and occupied the place for a time in the 60's. Later Mrs. Lord bought the place and lived here and had a millinery store in front and later moved her store to the Cuyler block as stated before. In the 80's Mrs. Lord sold the house and lot to Menzo Davis, who came to Palmyra about 1863 and entered into the employ of the late Barnett Davis as clerk," while Mr. Davis was on the corner of' Canal and Clinton Streets. He came with Mr. Davis when he moved to Main Street. After being with Mr. Davis some time, he took a job of driving the express wagon. In the 70's in company with Wright Gardner, he bought out the grocery store




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of William L. Tucker for whom Gardner had been clerk for several years and the firm name became Davis & Gardner. After a short time Mr. Gardner sold out his interest to Mr. Davis, who operated the store alone for several years. In the 80's he sold out to Bowman & Son, as mentioned before, and went to California. It was stated in the local papers he carried away forty thousand dollars which he had made in the store. After being in California awhile, he returned to Palmyra and after looking around awhile purchased the little white house as before mentioned, to make way for the fine brick block that we can see there now. The lower floor was fitted up for an up-to-date grocery store, which he occupied until his death, which occurred about 1904, when the late Frederick W. Griffith purchased the property for $8,000.

The fine offices in the second story have been occupied and still are, Judge S. Nelson Sawyer occupying the front office while George S. Tinklepaugh has a very pleasant office in the rear. The third story was occupied for some time by the fire company.

Mr. Davis, although an eccentric man, was honest in his dealings. If a child was sent to the store it received the same treatment as a grown person.

One day while Mr. Davis was sweeping the floor of his store, a lady was standing by. He had gotten so near with his broom she thought she would try and get out of his way and there was no other way only to go through the dirt. She gave a jump and landed in the middle of the pile. He says, "There you are, just like all the rest of the women, jump right square in the dirt." He kept right on sweeping without even cracking a smile.

One day while down town he saw an advertisement in Mr. Bowman's window, "Six cakes of soap for 25 cents." Mr. Davis thought this below cost. When he came back to the store, he put a notice in his window, "Six cakes of soap at Bowman's, 25 cents."

At the death of Mr. Davis the property was divided among his brothers, who soon scattered it to the winds. His grocery store was the printing office of the Palmyra Journal for several years.

Mr. Davis will soon be forgotten but the fine brick block he erected bids fair to stand a long time, bearing the name of Davis block.

As we pass along our next place is the late Dr. J. P. H. Deming residence and office. The doctor came here in the 30's when a young man. He studied medicine with Dr. Alexander McIntyre and married in the 40's. He practiced medicine until the 60's when he sold out to Dr. Kingman and went to Shortsville to live where he died a good many years later.

Dr. Kingman, soon after coming into possession of the property, made a good many changes in the house. He died in the 80's. The house was rented for awhile and the late Colonel A. P. Seeley lived here a few years. In the early 90's the late Senator F. W. Griffith bought the property and it is owned by his heirs.

The old neighbor on the west looks very much as it did in the 40's,




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when Augustus Elmendorf lived here. Mr. Elmendorf came to Palmyra in the 30's. While here he was engaged in the dry goods business, as mentioned before. In the 70's he sold his property and moved back East. Hon. Charles McLouth purchased the house and lot and lived here until the 80's when he built his new house on the corner of Cuyler and Jackson Streets.

The late David Johnson purchased the property and lived here until his death which occurred in the early 90's. Dr. L. H. Smith, when a young man, came to Palmyra from Syracuse, soon' after graduating from a medical college and began to practice medicine. Later he married a daughter of the late James Herbert and purchasd the Elmendorf house where he is still living. On or near this same site in 1812' was the clothery of Andrew G. Howe.

As we pass on still further we come to the Zion Episcopal Church. On this same site in 1820, Pliny Sexton had a jewelry store. In 1826 this property was sold to the Zion Episcopal Society and on September 28, 1827, the corner stone for the original church was laid of which more will be said later.

Exactly in the corner of the church yard and up to the street line on both Canandaigua and Main Streets and at a very early date on this same site was erected a two-story brick building. This was the first brick building in the village. James and Orin White, who erected this building, had a store here in 1817. Orin went to Ann Arbor, Mich., and that flourishing place owes its name to the wife of Mr. White, whose name was Anna. It was first known as Ann's Arbor, then Ann Arbor. James White removed to Black Rock. Israel J. Richardson and Samuel Allen succeeded the Whites and for a time conducted a heavy business. The former, after awhile, became engaged in the practice of law, and the latter a proprietor of a stage line between Canandaigua and this village. Later this building was used for a paint shop and at one time a wagon shop. In the 30's Isaac E. Beecher purchased the property and fitted it up for a dwelling house in which he lived. A frame addition was put on the south end. Here Mr. Beecher lived until the Zion Episcopal Church Society, in 1871, acquired the property to add to their lot. The old brick part was torn down and the frame part was sold to Hannah Sexton and moved to her lot on Church Street, just south of the Catholic Church. Mr. Beecher died a short time after.

Let us go back to the First National Bank of which more will be said later. The original building was built about 1830 and was painted red with green blinds. When the Palmyra Savings Bank went out of existence and the property came on the market, William Aldrich became its owner around the late 40's or 50's and moved into the north end. The building at that time was very much smaller than at the present time. There was a cellar kitchen that opened out on Williams Street.

Mr. Aldrich was a lawyer with an office on Williams Street. In 1925 it was moved across the way.

In the 60's Pliny T. Sexton married Hariett Hyde, daughter of Stephen




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Hyde, who lived in the Bowman house on the corner of Cuyler and Jackson Streets. Shortly after his marriage he bought the bank property and Mr. Aldrich went to New York to live where he died several years later. Mr. Sexton made elaborate and extensive improvements. The house was made larger on the ground and higher. In 1892 a fire-proof office was built on the west. The bank was also remodeled. He lived in this building until his death, which occurred in September, 1924, when O. J. Garlock purchased the real estate on that corner, extending north to the Williamson line. In 1926 the old post office in the Village Hall had become too small to meet the requirements of the government. When Mr. Garlock made a contract with the government to remodel the old bank and make an up-to-date post office, it was a great credit to the village. That same year Mr. Garlock sold the west end which included the fireproof office to a theatre syndicate that has erectd a fine theatre building. Thus has passed into history another old pioneer building.

Our next on the west is the old Robert Smith homestead. Mr. Smith came to Palmyra when a young man and at one time was foreman in the Jessup shoe factory at the foot of Main Street. At his death his son James came into possession of this property. Few places, if any, on our Main Street were in the possession of a single family longer than this. James Smith was, for a good many years, a partner of Lucius Foster in the boot and shoe business and under the firm name "Foster & Smith." During James' occupancy he made a good many improvements on the house. Following the death of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Smith the place was purchased by Mr. Sexton, who made a good many extensive improvements on the property. The archway in the center of the building was closed. Previous to this the east side of the archway was occupied in, the early 50's by L. M. Chase as a hardware store. Later Dr. Brown had an office here. Other tenants followed. Mr. Sexton, after making extensive repairs and improvements, placed the property so it might be utilized by many of the local organizations. The Red Cross Society found it a most desirable place for its activities in behalf of the boys who were in the service of their country. Mr. Sexton not only gave the rent, but furnished heat and light free of charge.

About the year 1846 Albert G. Merrick, who was born in Dorset, Vt., and 33 years of age, came to Palmyra and opened a marble shop in an old building in the southeast corner of the Lovett lot. Later Mr. Lovett purchased the property and tore down the old building and Mr. Merrick moved down on Market Street, as before mentioned, and opened a factory. The purchase of this property by Mr. Lovett added very much to the attractiveness of his property. The house in which Mr. Lovett lived stood about where the present band stand now is. With its spacious grounds, large shade trees and desirable location, this was the most attractive resident place in the village. At the death of Mr. Lovett, which occurred June 4, 1872, Mr. Sexton came into possession of this property. For a time, through neglect, the old house went fast to decay and was torn down in 1897, to give way for a fine band stand or pavilion, erected by




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Mr. Sexton. He also furnished in all, more than 5,000 chairs, for each year more or less were broken. At any time there were no less than 2,000 chairs that all who came, friend or stranger, might enjoy the music or watch the free movies, then screened on the side of the Smith house. Swings were put up for the children to enjoy.

This was not a public park, but a private park, and all who came were his guests, for he paid for the lighting, seating and care of the grounds.

One man spent nearly all his time during the sumer months in arranging the seats and keeping the park in order. On a pleasant evening in the summer time it was not uncommon to see two thousand people here. Fifty automobiles might be seen lined up on the side of the street in front of the park. The occupants had come from near and far to enjoy the ride and entertainment.

Anyone was welcome to enter this park, if they were willing to conform to the rules governing one's conduct therein, which rules were not arbitrary and which any respectable citizen would blush to disobey.

The iron fence in front of the park was erected about 1855 by Mr. Lovett. The builder was Robert Johnson, a skilled mechanic, the durability of the fence bearing mute testimony to his skill. The heavy stone base has hardly stirred out of line since it was built 75 years ago. The iron work was made in the foundry of the late Eldridge Williams where now is located the lumber yard of F. E. Rowley. Hiram H. Kelly, Elisha Kellogg and William Parsons. were the workmen employed. Kelly and Kellogg, when the Civil War broke out, answered their country's call where Kelly laid down his life in its defense. Mr. Kellogg and Mr. Parsons died a good many years ago.

The house on the west side of the park was, in the late 40's, the home of the late Dr. Durfee Chase, who moved here from the house on the southeast corner of Clinton and Canal Streets. He had a little office close to the street that has long since been torn away. The house at that time stood further back from the street. Joseph C. Lovett bought the house and lot of Mr. Chase in April, 1869.

Dr. Chase died at an advanced age at the home of his daughter, Mrs. George McGown on Washington Street and his wife died several years later. The late John W. Corning, a veteran of the Civil War, bought the property. After his death the property was sold to Dr. R. A. Reeves who made a good many changes on the house. After living here a few years he sold the place to Dr. Herman L. Chase and Dr. Reeves moved to the Anderson house on the corner of Jackson and Canandaigua Streets.

Adjoining this place on the west: This house is on the same site where a merchant by the name of Barnett Johnson lived in the early 50's. Mr. Johnson sold out and moved away. For his second wife he married Miss Priscilla Wylie, who in 1855-56 taught in the Union School.

The property was bought by the late Seth Harkness, who moved the old house away and erected one that was more modern and attractive. In the 70's this fine house was burned and rebuilt. He lived here until his death, which occurred about 1898. The property was sold to the late




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Hiram G. Clark, a veteran of the Civil War, who had lost a leg while in the army and that injury cost him his life. Mr. Clark, for a number of years, was engaged in the insurance business with W. H. H. Osborn, later with Austin R. Knapp as mentioned before. After the death of Mr. Clark the place was sold to Dr. Herman L. Chase, where he lived and had his office. In 1923 he sold this place to Robert Dohse and moved to the Dr. Reeves house.

Passing on to the corner and turning north on Church Street: Our first house, up to about 1900, was one evidently built in early times. The south end was brick, while the rest of the house was of wood. In the 40's a Mr. Warner lived here, who moved buildings. In those days it was a good business. Mr. Warner had two sons, Orin and Palatiah. The latter was in the Civil War. After the death of Mr. Warner, the Presbyterian Society bought the property and it was rented for several years. About 1910 the house was torn down.

Still farther north are two old pioneer houses. These houses were bought by the late Hannah Sexton and moved to this lot. The one in front is the old Kingsley Miller house that stood on Cuyler Street and on the site of the Williamson house on the east side of the street, which will be pointed out as we advance in our journey. The old house in the rear is the old Beecher house as mentioned before. The little house across the way, next to the cemetery, is the old Dagett house, whose owner once had a foundry on Canal Street, where the Crandall Company's factory now is. When this house was built it stood on a high hill that has been drawn away and the house lowered. Later it was owned by the Fennell sisters.

The little house south was once owned by Mrs. Ella Hulburt and now it is owned by Frank Rush. Near this little house and just south in 1812, was Washington Hall. This was a two-story building. The upper story was used for societies. George Beckwith occupied the lower floor for a store. At that time there was but one house on the street and that was the home of James Benson. This old hall has long since passed from memory.

The little two-story white house on the south is where Dr. Henry North lived in the 50's. Later it was owned by Mrs. Ella Antisdale. Now it is owned and occupied by Frank Van DeMortel.

We have now passed over Church Street, which was once called Chapel Street and was laid out August 20, 1847, and again June 5, 1860, having passed over the northern end when we journeyed along Canal Street. We will say more, however, later.

We have now arrived at the Methodist Church. On this same site in 1792 Dr. Azel Ainsworth opened a public house. He was born in Canterbury, Conn., December 22, 1759. He removed to Wayne County in 1792 and died in Buffalo May 5, 1854. He married first Sarah Rogers, September 15, 1785, a sister of Judge William Rogers of Palmyra. She died September 9, 1824. He married again, his second wife being Betsy




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Johnston. The marriage was performed April 8, 182'6. She died August 16, 1840.

In 1805 he was granted a tavern license. Dr. Ainsworth was Palmyra's first postmaster, holding that office in 1806, being succeeded by Ira Silby in 1814.

When Rochester began to attract attention he moved there. At the corner of Main and State Streets, where the Powers block now stands, was erected the first house on the west side of the river. The lot originally belonged to Colonel Nathaniel Rochester, who sold it to Henry Skinner of Geneseo, and he built the house for Hamlet Scranton in 1818. This house was removed to the rear of the lot for a stable and Dr. Ainsworth built the Ainsworth House, the precursor of the Eagle Hotel. The attic of this house was the first to have a public hall, and in 1821 was opened up as an elegant museum, consisting of 34 wax figures, two organs, and other attractions. The first concert heard in Rochester was in this attic hall and was given by Philip Phillips. Russell Ainsworth, son of Dr. Azel, was the landlord in 1827. In 1829 this building was removed and replaced by the Eagle Hotel, and for nearly 40 years was well and favorably known throughout the country. The last landlord was S. D. Walbridge, who closed its doors to the public on the 11th of February, 1865.

Thus did one of the early settlers of Palmyra become actively identified with the early days of Rochester.

Dr. Ainsworth had three children: Marie, who married Hubbard Hall in 1813; Sophronia, who married Benjamin Campbell, February 5, 1823, and Russell, who died in 1834. Marie was born in Connecticut and came to Palmyra with her father, married at 20 and moved to Churchville and Byron, where she lived until 1872, when she returned to Palmyra. She died here November 21, 1880, aged 88 years.

Many will remember the Hall family of Clinton Street, where they lived for many years. Julia M. Hall was the last member here, dying in California a few years since.

Where Dr. Alexander McIntyre built his house, just east of the Ainsworth tavern, was previously the dooryard of the tavern. The front part of this large house was of brick and was three stories high with a ball room on the third floor. The beautiful winding stairs leading from the first floor to the upper story was in all probability, built by William Kellogg, who was noted for his ability in putting up stair railings and mantels that adorned many a fine house in our village.

In the rear of the brick front was the original Ainsworth tavern of wooden construction, and for a good many years, Dr. McIntyre rented it to families. But in the 50's the old wooden part was torn down and rebuilt of brick and was two stories high. The old Ainsworth tavern has now passed into history and there are but few who remember it. And even the old McIntyre house is fast passing from remembrance.

After the death of Mrs. McIntyre, the doctor broke up housekeeping and the brick structure was to act in the capacity, and follow the same vocation, as its predecessor, either as a tavern, or boarding house, until




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July 23, 1866, when the Methodist Episcopal Church Society purchased the property and the ground was broken for the present brick edifice. After erecting the church they built a new parsonage on the site of the old barn. The first minister to occupy the new home was Rev. E. J. Brooker.

Going west from the Methodist Church we come to an old-time two-story house erected in early day when everyone wanted to live near the street. Previous to Dr. McIntyre's buying the tavern, he owned and lived in this house. Here his son Samuel was born. This old house has been owned and occupied by the Everson family a good many years and still retains its old-time appearance.

Its neighbor on the west, when first built was equally as close to the street, until in the 70's when a Mr. Bell purchased the property and moved the house further back and remodeled it and it now bears a more up-to-date appearance. In the early 50's the late Walter Stephens once lived here and in the early 50's also, Anson Talcott, the tobacco man, lived here. After Mr. Bell, George S. rrinklepaugh bought the property and occupied the house. After making some improvements he sold the property to Milo Sweezey who owns the place now.

We now come to the old Lilley tavern, owned and managed by Asa Lilley and known as the "Lilley Coffee House" in 1812. The tavern proper stood near the street, while in front in the street was a well with a pump and watering trough. The dwelling house joined on the northwest corner running back to the north, lapping by sufficient for a door that they might pass from one to the other.

Where the Nichols house now stands were a barn and long sheds to accommodate the tavern. Before this tavern, on training day, the militia used to parade. In the day of the stage coach, this was one of the calling places.

Franklin Bortles was a son-in-law, who after Mr. Lilley's death, kept the tavern until in the 50's when this was given up. The old tavern was moved away; the well in the street was filled up; the old sheds and barn were demolished and the lot was sold to William Tucker on which to build a house.

Mr. Bortles and wife died in the 70's. The rest of the family moved away and thus the old Lilley tavern passed into history.

After Mr. Bortles' death, George S. Johnson purchased the house and lot, remodeled the house and lived here until his death, which occurred in October, 1924. Mr. Johnson was a son of William R. Johnson and was brought up on a farm. When a young man, for awhile, he taught in the Union School. He married a daughter of Lucius Foster. He was in the boot and shoe business a number of years until his death, as before mentioned. He was at one time President of the Village. He also served two terms as Supervisor and later was elected a Member of Assembly and again elected the second time, but he did not live to begin his second term. His death was a great loss to the village and community in which he lived. His wife died several years before.




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After Mr. Tucker had purchased the vacant lot he soon erected a fine house in which to live. This was in the 70's, but he did not live long to enjoy his new home. One day he climbed a ladder to clean out a gutter on the roof, when he fell, striking his head on the flag walk, rendering him unconscious. He never rallied. The widow, after living here a short time, sold the place to Eugene Nichols, one of the firm of the Garlock Packing Company. After buying this place the house was enlarged and remodeled. The grounds were made attractive. But this young man did not live long to enjoy the prosperity of this new enterprise, dying in the 80's. His widow retained the place, made a good many additions and improvements and enjoyed her great fortune that came from the large profits of this infant industry. She died in 1922, leaving upwards of two million dollars to her two nieces, one of whom married a Mr. Randall of Rochester. The other married George L. Abbott, who is at present president of the Garlock Packing Company. Such have been the changes on the original site of the Lilley tavern, since it first opened in 1812.

Adjoining this on the west, in 1812, was Blackman's blacksmith shop. A good many found shelter in the long sheds for the horses whose drivers had business in the Coffee Shop. Later a large white house was built on this lot and in the late 40's and early 50's was the home of E. M. Smith. This fine house had a large veranda on the south and about 1854 was owned and occupied by a Mrs. Lilley, but no relation to Asa Lilley. She was a daughter of the late Abner F. Lakey. About 1858 she sold the place to L. M. Chase, the hardware man. In the 70's the Baptist Church Society bought of Mr. Chase, this property for a Baptist parsonage and Mr. Chase moved to Pennsylvania. Rev. C. N. Pettingill was its first occupant after coming into their possession.

Later this was sold to a man by the name of Van Deuzer, who had been a contractor on the West Shore Railroad, when it was built and the Baptist Society bought the Sansbury place on the corner of Canandaigua and Jackson Streets. Mr. Van Deuzer remodeled the house and made a great many changes on the exterior. A cupola was added and the house was made modern inside as well as outside. After living here a short time, he sold to J. K. Williamson, who had been living in a house he built on Jackson Street and Mr. Van Deuzer went West.

We now come to Liberty Street which was laid out May 8, 1841. Passing along on the west side our first house is the little Oak Sylvester house. Mr. Sylvester lived here in the 50's. He was a cooper by trade and later bought out the Hemingway Drug Store as before mentioned. Later he moved to a house on Washington Street which we will see as we advance in our journey. As we pass along Liberty Street our next house is the Ludlow L. Hansen house. Mr. Hansen came to Palmyra in the 70's and purchased this house of V. Nims. He also bought all the land north to the Canal, had Hansen Street laid out and sold the lots on which the houses have been built. He also had a dry house on the north side next to the Canal. Hansen Street ran west and intersected with Carroll Street.




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About in the 90's Mr. Hansen sold out and moved away. George Bockoven now owns and occupies the place and has for several years.

Our next house was built by the late Wesley Bly, who came from his farm in the country and erected this fine house in the 80's. After living here a few years he returned to his farm. About 1908 Samuel Newman purchased the property and still owns and occupies the house. Liberty Street runs to the Canal and on the west side and on top of the hill lives Mrs. Beatty, who bought this house which was built by Mr. Hansen.

This hill was for a iong time called "Cannon Hill," for at the completion of the Erie Canal, when the first boat passed down through from Albany to Buffalo, cannons were fired at every village as the boats passed. There are but very few today who ever knew or ever heard of Cannon Hill.

On the corner of Main and Liberty Streets in early day, a story and half house was built. In the 40's John Rowling, an Englishman and a carpenter by trade, purchased this property and transformed it into a typical English residence, with high fences and shrubbery almost hiding the house from view. Mr. Rowling died in the early 50's, his widow a few years later. When this property was put upon the market for sale Dr. Almon Pratt bought the place, moved the old house on Washington Street and built the pres'ent Parker home on this same site. Dr. Pratt was born in Ontario in 1805. He lived in Palmyra and studied medicine with Alexander McIntyre. He married a sister of Mrs. G. R. Stoddard and died in Rochester in 1875. Lorenzo Parker bought the property of Dr. Pratt in 1861, moving with his family from the large farm situated on the Walker Road about three miles from the village. He made this place his home for many years. Here he died in 1887. Since 1896 the widow has died; also one son, John, leaving a son and daughter occupying the homestead, with another son now living in New Jersey. Much of the land lying between Liberty and Church Streets and north of the front row of lots on Main Street between those two cross streets, w'as owned by Mr. Parker and years since Mr. Parker was accustomed to cut from his timber land on the farm, cords and cords of wood, drawing it to the village and piling it on the vacant land east of Liberty Street. All this land has been sold and houses have been erected here. Stephen Smith's son owns and occupies the north house.

Adjoining on the south is the Congdon homestead, occupied by Edgar Congdon, who has a shoe store on Main Street as I said before. The remainder of the lot lying to the south was bought by Mrs. Edna Nichols and very much improved.

Returning to Main Street and passing on west: Dr. Hagaman bought a lot off the west side of the Parker place and erected a fine new home. Adjoining this on the west is the old Drake homestead. The family came here in the 30's. At one time this was classed among the fine houses in the village, with its veranda facing the east and south and painted white with green blinds. Long years have passed since Cornelius and William




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Drake and two sisters lived here in this home until death claimed them one by one.

On July 3, 1872, lightning struck near the house, while members of the family were about, and Willie Drake was killed. He was but a child, perhaps two years old at the time of his death. Mr. Cole, one of the local editors lived here at one time, in fact was living there when the place was purchased by Russell F. Stoddard in March, 1887. The purchase price was $2,500. After living here many years Mrs. Stoddard died. The daughter married and moved to Syracuse and Mr. Stoddard later made his home there where he died in 1913.
The place passed into the possession of Albert A. Mitchell following the removal of the Stoddard family and for a number of years was occupied by Frank Wallace and family. In March, 1905, Charles Joyce purchased the property and now still owns and occupies the place.

When Daniel Harmon sold his house and lot on Washington Street to David Finley, a native of Walworth, and brother of M. C. Finley, in February, 1874, he bought a lot on the east side of the Beckwith place and built the present home of William Wemes.

Mr. Harmon, after living here a short time, sold the place to Frank Antisdale. Here, too, Mrs. Chloe M. Norton lived at one time. She was the widow of C. M. Walker, later marrying Philander H. Norton in 1875. The Nortons lived for a time just north of the New York Central depot, across the way from the Thad Philips farm. The Antisdales moved into the village in 1889, after the Nortons.

We now come to the home of the late George Beckwith, who should have more than just passing mention. He was one of the earliest settlers of this county. Mr. Beckwith was born in East Hadden, Conn., October 16, 1790. He left his native state in 1811 and located at Pittsford, Monroe County, where he served as a clerk in the store of Augustus G. Elliott. He remained there but a short time, removing to Palmyra, forming a copartnership with his older brother and embarking in mercantile business under the firm name of N. H. and G. Beckwith. He subsequently conducted the business alone and succeeded in making a fortune. On August 1, 1814, he married Ruth Maston Clark, a native of Lynn, Connecticut, born February 2, 1793. At the time of his marriage, he was a resident of Palmyra. As there were no railroads or canals at that time their wedding journey had to be made in a carriage, the gift of Gordon Clark, the father of the bride.

His family consisted of five, none of whom are living. His name, influence and enterprise can be traced in the institutions and foundations of this community. Few of the early families to make a home or homes in this village were more closely connected with the commercial and social life here than that of the Beckwiths. Almost the only reminder of that family today is the old homestead situated on the north side of West Main Street, back from the road.

The members of the family were gradually lessened in numbers and the homestead had been transferred to others. About twenty-two years




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ago interest in both the family and home was revived by the fact the old homestead was undergoing extensive repairs. At that time the following paragraph appeared and was probably penned by the late Fred W. Clemons. In the March 2, 1902, issue of The Wayne County Journal, we find the following:

"In the general overhauling and repairing of the Beckwith place at Palmyra, the removal of a layer or two of wallpaper disclosed the following valuable information: 'Octobber 16, 1835, Asahel Millard builder, Elisha Hinman carpenter, Benjamin T. Gregory plasterer.' This record was evidently made nearly 90 years ago. Mr. lVlillard and William R. Johnson married sisters. Millard and Hinman subsequently worked on the Palmyra Hotel building in 1837-38 and later on the Union School building in 1847-48. There was building and there were builders in those days in old Palmyra."

The foregoing record as found made in the moist plaster on the wall of the old homestead may be accepted as evidence of the age of the building. Samuel Beckwith and Hannah, his wife, lived in East Hadden, Conn. They had twelve children. Eight of them came to Western New York. Naomi married John Church and settled in Hopewell where she later died leaving four children. Barak went to Albion, lived to be ninety years of age and at his death he left a son William. Samuel lived where the Fred L. Reeves farm is now on the East Palmyra Road. His death occurred as the result of an accident. Nathaniel was a business man of Palmyra. He built the late Calvin Seeley house on Main Street. He died in Palmyra leaving a son James B. Beckwith. George was a successful merchant in Palmyra for fifty-five years. Ann was the wife of Alexander McIntyre, whom she married in 1818. Sophia was the wife of Joel Foster. Dolly was the tenth child and was born in 1752 and in 1810 married Wells Anderson of East Hadden, Connecticut.

Following the completion of the repairs to this home in 1905, Professor W. G. Dean occupied all but the west part of the house. S. D. Van Alstine occupied the west wing' and took his wife there as a bride, but the following Spring moved to the Flowers house where he lived until removing to Rochester.

Professor W. W. Bullock succeeded Professor Dean as a tenant, while Mr. and Mrs. George Trull occupied the west end. Mr. and Mrs. Hans Giese later became occupants of the homestead.

Thus of this old family we have collected and woven together some of the scattered threads of their early history and of the old homestead, which in outward appearance looks today very much as when first built about ninety-five years ago. Lots have been sold that others might build. Mr. Beckwith died in 1867, his wife a few years later and the old homestead passed into the hands of P. T. Sexton. After the death of Mr. Sexton the place passed to his daughter, Mrs. Hans Giese and at her death to Mr. Giese, who later sold it to Cecil R. Hubbard who has remodeled the place and is now living there.

The house in which George S. Tinklepaugh lives stands on a lot that




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came off the Beckwith place. This house was built in the 60's by the late George Bowman. After living here a short time it came into the hands of Frank C. Mann, about 1898. It was also once owned by Almon Green and finally this elegant home became the property of Mr. Tinklepaugh, a very able lawyer of this village, and was enlarged to one of the finest homes in Palmyra.

The house adjoining on the west, way back in the 50's, was for a short time the home of Thomas Richmond, a son-in-law of William B. Nottingham. He was a contractor on the Erie Canal and built the aqueduct at the west end of the village, which was called a fine piece of work, although owing to the changes that have been made in the canal, it never will be used again. At the time Mr. Richmond lived here it was a large two-story yellow house. Later the late Henry North purchased the property and lived here until his death. He was a dentist by profession and considered one of the best of his time. His daughter, Mrs. Hattie North Chase, now owns and occupies the place which has been remodeled and enlarged.

Adjoining on the west, on the same site as the Sherburne garage, in the 40's, stood a little white house with old-time door scraper, in which Harvey Starkweather lived. Later Polly Ford and her sister Abby bought the property and after living here a number of years sold the place to Mrs. Harriet North and moved to Oregon. After a few years Mrs. North sold the little house to Ulysses Sherburne. The old house was torn down to make room for the present garage. Thus passes away another old landmark.

Let us return to the corner of Main and Canandaigua Streets. Shortly after the Erie Canal was completed, Messrs. Lasher and Candee, canal contractors, opened a supply store in a building previously occupied by Timothy C. Strong on the same site where the Baptist Church now stands. This firm did a good business with the canal hands, bought produce of the farmers and brought to Palmyra the first stock of gilt-framed looking glasses of various styles.

As we pass along on West Main Street after passing the Baptist Church, in our first place in the 40's lived Lorin Oysterbanks, in an old frame house which he sold in 1850 to Remus Ferrin, who tore down the old house and erected the present brick house. Mr. Ferrin came here from Canal Street as mentioned before. Mr. Ferrin died in the 50's and the property was rented to the late Fay Purdy, a Methodist Exhorter. In the 60's Mr. Purdy moved away. The widow Ferrin, in the 60's, married Dr. Samuel Sabin and occupied the house. A few years later the doctor died, his wife dying a few years after.

Among some of the owners after the death of Mrs. Sabin were the late Dr. Brown, who came here in the 60's and died in the 70's. After his death the family moved away and Dr. Herman L. Chase became a tenant for a time. In the 80's the; late Zachariah Ashley Van Duzer, moving from his farm, purchased the property from the Brown heirs. Mr. Van Duzer died December 30, 1914, leaving the home to his daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth




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McPherson, wife of the late Dr. Donald McPherson and she is living there now.

The neighbor on the west, was in the 40's, the residence of the late Thomas Douglass, the jeweler. In the 60's he sold out and moved away and Mrs. Edgar Jordon bought the property and lived here several years. In the 90's Mrs. William Chapman bought the property. The old house was sold and moved to the corner of Walker and Fayette Streets. It is now owned by the heirs of Mrs. Eleanor Gowling. A new house was built on the same site of the old one. At her death the property passed into the hands of Clyde Hall who owns and occupies it now.

Our next house on the west was built by the late Daniel Harmon, a contractor and builder. The barn in the rear he built for a shop. In the 80's this attractive place was sold to M. Story, the merchant. In this home he lived until his death, which occurred in the 90's, his wife dying a few years later. Then the place was sold to Arthur T. Jones, who keeps a clothing store on Main Street.

We now come to where once lived Albert Jessup in the 40's. He was in company with Mr. Tuttle in the tanning business at the lower end of Main Street. After Mr. Jessup's death the property came into the hands of Henry M. Johnson, who died about 1910. His widow still occupied the place, renting the west part to tenants, until her death, which was about 1914, and the place was sold to Miss Agnes Epler, who now owns and occupies the place as Mrs. Frank Boutall.

In the large two-story house on the west in the late 40's lived Edwin M. Anderson, son of Wells Anderson. In the 60's he sold the place to the late Henry P. Knowles, coming from Lyons. Mr. Knowles was a major in the Civil War and was in the banking business on Main Street until his death, which occurred in the 90's. At his death the business was settled up and the bank closed. The honlestead is still in the family.

Hard by in the 90's stood an old landmark owned and occupied by Eldridge Havens, a native of Connecticut, who came to Palmyra in an early day. Before the New York Central went through, Mr. Havens was meat inspector at one of the warehouses on Canal Street, where in the Winter they bought pork and packed it in barrels for Spring shipment when the canal opened. At his death which occurred in the 50's the house and lot went to his grandchildren, Charles and Eldridge T. Allyn. In the 90's the old house was moved away and a new one built on the same site. The Allyn brothers sold the place and went to California to live where they both died.

Mrs. Edna Nichols purchased the property which is now owned by her heirs and occupied by Hays Ostrander. While this old landmark has passed from memory its old neighbor on the west is looking hale and hearty, although built in the days when all the frames to the houses were hewn out instead of sawed out. In this house in the 40's lived the Presbyterian minister by the name of Fisher. After he moved away the late Henry Flowers occupied this place until 1906, when Sanford Van Alstine purchased the property. Previous to this there had been no change in




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this old-fashioned house and with tenacity it seemed to cling to its oldtime appearance. The little old 5-foot seats and a 5x6-foot platform at the front door occupied the same position as in the early 30's when the house was first built and was not complete without these fair weather resting places at the front door. We also look in vain to see at the back of the house the old open woodshed where a pile of plenty of hard maple wood was stored for future use for the kitchen and sitting-room stoves. Yes, we look in vain to see the old well with its pulley wheel and rope attached to draw water. All of these have passed froIH nlemory. Now a modern porch adorns its front. The opening at the woodshed has been closed. The old well has been filled and the old oaken bucket and the pulley wheel are known only in story and in song. Coal now takes the place of wood. A turn of the faucet delivers the water instead of a bucket and the charms of old have faded away like a dying echo. Mr. Van Alstine is a native of the town of Palmyra, born on his grandfather's farm four miles north of the village. After passing through college he entered into the employ of Pliny T. Sexton in the First National Bank of Palmyra. While here he married the daughter of the late James Harrison. For several years he has been holding a lucrative and responsible position with the Eastman Kodak Company.

Our next call will be where Thomas Ninde lived. He was once the postmaster on Market Street in the 40's. In the 50's Newton Foster acquired the property. He was engaged in making drills and other agricultural implements. His factory was on the north side of the canal where the old electric light plant was. The firm name was Jessup & Foster. He had one son and a daughter, the latter married a Mr. Vail, a photographer, who lived in the brick house on the east side of Mill Street near the brook. The son, Harold, went to Lincoln, Nebraska, where he died several years later. In the 70's Major Murganzie Hopkins purchased the property and remodeled the house and barn. He was born at Union Hill where he spent his early days on his father's farm. He was a soldier in the Civil War and was promoted to major. After returning from the army he chose law as his profession. He practiced a good many years, having a partnership with F. E. Converse, under the firm name of Hopkins & Converse, with an office in the Aldrich block, now owned by the Wayne Telephone Company. When he became too old for active legal work the partnership was dissolved and he retired from business. In the 70's he married a daughter of the late Hon. Martin Butterfield. He died about 1910 and his wife went to live with her daughter in Syracuse and died a few years later. About 1914 the late Dayton Smith purchased the property. His widow still owns and occupies the place.

On the corner of Main and Washington Streets is where the married daughter of the late Edward S. Averill lives. This house was built by the late Pliny Sexton and in the 50's this was his home. In the 50's a Mrs. Higbee lived here. Later Edward S. Averill, editor and proprietor of the Palmyra Courier, purchased the property. About 1856 he also purchased the paper property. At the time of his death he was the oldest newspaper




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man in service in Wayne County. He was born in Albany in 1835. He was collector of canal tolls from 1863 to 1868. He was postmaster in 1871-72 and was at one time a member of the Board of Education. His two sons, Ralph R. and Harry L., carried on the pUblication of the Courier until the death of Ralph R., which occurred about 1920, when the business was sold to Jenner Hennessy. A third son, Robert Averill, lives in Rochester.

On the opposite corner as we go west, we conle to the home of the late Dr. David Hoyt, who came to Palmyra in the 30's. He was a partner of Dr. May in a drug store as stated before. He died in 1857 and his wife died soon after, leaving one daughter who came into possession of the the property, In the 50's she married Dr. Francis Clayton Brown.

In the 70's a new home had been projected and as soon as plans had been completed the old house was divided and moved on two separate lots on the south side of Jackson Street. A large, fine, new house was erected on the same site of the old one. The late Samuel Sawyer was its builder and under his supervision it was well built. The house was built after Mr. Brown's design. The observer will note there are no corner boards, but that the joints made by the two sides being brought together are so well made that corner boards were unnecessary. Here for many years Dr. Brown lived, who had his dental office over the Briggs drug store on Main Street as mentioned before. He died January 2, 1904, leaving a widow and one daughter. The widow died soon after. At her death, title to the property passed to the only daughter, Sibyl Huntington Brown, who after living here several years, sold the property in 1924 to Henry Mason and moved to Rochester. The house has been divided and remodeled and is now owned by U. W. Sherburne.

Adjoining this on the west is the old Jacques place. That family owned and occupied this place in the 40's. In the 90's John Bulmer bought the property for $500 and made a few improvements, then sold it to Mrs. Mary Ryan.

Our next place on the west is the old Henry P. Allyn property. Mr. Allyn was a native of Connecticut and a son-in-law of Eldridge Havens. He came here in the 30's and later bought this lot and built the house. He was a plasterer by trade, which he followed for many years. Mr. Allyn had three sons, one dying in the 50's. He had a brother living in New York who was a miser and whose wardrobe was valued at fifty cents. This brother died in the 70's leaving a large fortune to his brother who wisely invested it in real estate. One piece of property was the old Jackway farm on Stafford Street in which they moved, retaining the homestead. After the father's death the property came to his two sons, Charles and Eldridge T. H. Allyn, who after living on the farm several years and building the large barn, sold the farm and moved to California. Charles died about 1900 and Eldridge about 1915. About 1910 Charles Wilber bought the village homestead and diyided the lot. His son-in-law, Leo Spier took the old house and remodeled it and Mr. Wilber built the house that stands on the east, where his heirs are still living. Mr. Wilber was a




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carriage ironer by trade. More will be said of him as we advance in our journey.

The little house on the west was owned in the 70's by a Mr. Bigelow, son of George Bigelow. Later it was owned by Dickinson Lyon, who after living here several years, sold the place to Henry Hunt. In 1924 Mr. James Harrison purchased the property.

The little brick house on the west was built in the 50's and has had a number of different owners. Among them is Dr. William B. Crandall, who practiced medicine at one time in Palmyra, at one time with Dr. Hoyt, later in the drug store of Dr. Deming. In 1864 he moved to Rochester and conducted a drug business in or near the Arcade on Main Street. Returning to Palmyra in 1872, he made his home here again. His death occurred in 1874. The widow died several years later. About 1907 it was finally sold to B. M. Nobel who was employed by the Crandall Company. After staying here a brief period Mr. Nobel sold the property to Jacob Hartman and moved away. Mr. Hartman now owns and occupies the place.

We now come to another old-time place, the home of Dr. George N. Bigelow, who came here over eighty-five years ago. Long years have rolled around and no changes have been made only to keep it in good repair, making it look as well as it did in the long ago when the doctor went down town behind the old gray mare on the democrat wagon. In those days a doctor was a dentist as well. Then teeth were extracted with an instrument called turnkey and when one had to have a tooth drawn, he bade farewell to friends and kindred before he took the chair. Dr. Bigelow died January 21, 1867 in his sixty-seventh year. The widow died at the home of her daughter in Boston in September, 1903, at the age of ninety-four years. At the death of the mother, a daughter, Mrs. Lydila Bigelow Scott came into possession of the property. Mrs. Scott, who lived in a distant city, came every year to spend a few summer months in her childhood home. The old apple tree in the back yard, the little 7x9 glass window lights in the old house, all had their charm for her. One was impressed by the material evidence of a desire on the part of the daughter to maintain the home unchanged as a nlark of respect to the father and mother who made this their home for so many years.

Mrs. Scott has now passed away and the home is now owned by Raymond Smith who has made many changes.

As we pass on we come to another old-time place where around 1800 Silas Hart built the first frame house in the village. In the 40's Captain Daniel Gates purchased the property and lived here. When the days of the packet boat had passed and the captain found it no longer a paying business, he sold out and went into the livery business in company with Freman Thompson under the firm name of Gates & Thompson. In the 60's the firm sold the business to another party and the partnership was dissolved.

About that time or soon after, John Bulmer came to Palmyra to engage in the lumber business and after looking around awhile he purchased




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the Gates property. Mr. Gates, after living in Palmyra over thirty years, moved to Canandaigua where he died January 29, 1884.

As soon as Mr. Bulmer came into possession of the property and this being a desirable location, he inlmediately began to lay plans for a new house. The old house was moved to a vacant lot on Gates Street and remodeled. This old pioneer house was shorn of its old-time appearance. Now instead of a large, plain, old house with 7x9 windows, it was changed to one of a more modern type. After awhile it came into the possession of the Olivett family by purchase. Later it was sold to H. W. Guthrie. Now it is owned and occupied by W. H. Fitzgerald.

On the old site Mr. Bulmer built the commodious residence now owned and occupied by Fred E. Rowley, who came here from Smethport, Pa., and bought out the Bulmer interest, both in the Main Street property and the lumber yard on Canal Street. Mr. Bulmer had the distinction of keeping the best stocked lumber yard of any village in the state of the size of Palmyra. Mr. Bulmer died about 1906, being nearly ninety years old at the tinle of his death. His wife survived him a few years. No member of the family is living here at present. Thus another family active in the affairs of the community and prominent in the lumber interests of this locality is gone. He lived most of his life here and has gone the way of all, leaving behind his impress upon the life of the community.

Across on the opposite corner in the early 40's stood; a story and a half double house. In the 50's it was owned by a Mr. Rice, a bachelor, who came to Palmyra to engage in the jewelry business. He died in the 70's and the property passed into the hands of the late John Philips, the butcher, with whom Mr. Rice lived for a good many years, occupying the Rice house.

After coming into possession of this property, Mr. Philips sold the old house to George P. Nichols who moved it to Stafford Street. Now it is owned and occupied by Fred Jeffery. On the site of the old house Mr. Philips built the present double house now owned and occupied by Dickinson Lyon.

As we pass on we came to where in the 50's Samuel Sawyer, father of our townsman, Justice S. Nelson Sawyer, lived. In the 60's Mr. Tyler, father of the late Wells Tyler, lived here. A son, Edwin, enlisted in the Civil War and a short time after was taken with smallpox and died. Later in the 70's the late Richard Ford purchased the property. Mr. Ford was a butcher by trade. He came from New York in the 20's and spent the remainder of his life in this community. He died at this home about 1906 at the age of ninety-five years. After the death of Mr. Ford, Benjamin Throop purchased the property. After living here a short time he sold the property to Harry Young, who conducts the large hardware store at Holmes and Canal Streets.

Our second place, a large two-story house, was built away back in the 30's. In the 50's the place was owned and occupied by John Tripp. Milla Smith, a niece who lived with them and whose parents lived west of




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Macedon, married Milton Brown, who died a few years later. In the 60's she married the late Wells Tyler, who was in the clothing business and at one time kept the post office.

After the Civil War, Henry Wood, a veteran, purchased the property of Mr. Tripp. After a few years his son Henry built the small house on the east side of the lot, now owned and occupied by Abigal Bishop. Henry Wood, sr., died in the 90's and his widow died in 1928.

Our next place is the Albert Niles place. He was a cooper, who lived here in the 60's and died in the 70's. It is now owned and occupied by William Harding.

Adjoining this on the west, away back in the 40's, lived the late Lyman Tiffany, who had one son, Byron, who went to Washington in the 60's and lived there until his death which occurred in 1923. At one time the father was deputy postmaster. About 1905 Edwin Hurlbut bought the property, enlarged the house and made a good many repairs, making it into a double house. Mr. Hurlbut has been street commissioner in the village for several years.

In the early 50's the late Jerry McGrath bought the next house and came there to live. In the 70's he remodeled the house. He was a shoemaker by trade and for many years had his shop in the rear of Pratt's meat market where the trolley station now is. He died about 1900. His wife lived several years when she died. Then the place was sold to L. C. Dresser who died a few years ago and the place is now owned by Miss Blanche Hunt.

Our next neighbor on the west is where the late Walter Lapham lived in the early 50's. Mr. Lapham at that time, kept a clothing store in one of the old wooden buildings in the Jarvis row before the present brick block was built. He died in the 70's and his wife, a little later. Francis Jones bought the property and made a gOOd many changes. Mr. Jones died in 1930.

We now come to the old Harvey Tice place. This house was built in the 60's and occupied by the late Charles Bingham who previous to coming here carried on the blacksmithing business in the old Bingham shop as before mentioned. Mr. Bingham died in the 70's. The place was in the Tice family until 1926 when it was sold. It is about four rods wide and extends south to Jackson Street and may sometime in the future be opened up as a street.

We now come to the old Bela Morgan place. He was a native of Connecticut. He came from his farm to the village in the early 50's. His first wife died in the 60's. A short time after, he married the widow Schemerhorn who was once the wife of the late John Hurlbut. He died in the 70's. The place was left to his nieces, daughters of Orlando Stoddard, one of whom owns the place. More will be said of Mr. Morgan as we advance in our journey.

The next is a part of a tract of land owned in 1812 by Zebulon Williams, who was Palmyra's first merchant. This property came into




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the possession of Richard, his son. The tract extended from the Morgan west line west to Stafford Street.

On the lot that F. E. Converse owns once stood an old house. It was torn down in the 70's by a Mr. Winslow, who had acquired the property and erected the present house now owned and occupied by Mr. Converse, who is an able lawyer in our village. Mr. Converse bought the property in the 90's.

As we advance in our journey we come to where in early day stood another old-time house. In the 70's Captain Stephen Tabor came from Walworth, purchased this pJace, tore down the old house and built the present house, and if you will remove the ornament over the window you will see the figures 1-8-7-6, built in that year. Mr. Tabor was a native of New Bedford, Mass. He was from a sea-faring family and was a sailor himself who followed whaling. In the 40's he and his brother Abraham, who was also a sailor, came to Walworth and each purchased a farm. Stephen, in the 70's sold his farm. After living in his new house in the village of Palmyra a few years, he died in the 80's. His widow lived several years later when she died.

Mr. Tabor had two sons and one daughter. The latter married a Dr. Rose and went West to live. The sons were Stephen and Pardon. The latter started out as a whaler when but sixteen years old and followed the sea a good many years. He died in Walworth about 1920, being about eighty years of age. Stephen died in 1928 at the age of ninety-three. After the death of Mr.Tabor the place was sold to Franklin Stoddard, son of Orlando Stoddard, who still lives here.

Adjoining this on the west was the home of the late Joseph Truax, a veteran of the Civil War. After returning from the war he married Hariett Shirtliff, daughter of the late James Shirtliff, whose father was one of the first settlers in the village. Mr. Truax was a carpenter by trade. He bought the present lot and built the house. He died at the age of eighty-four. Mr. Truax received injuries in the army which resulted in having his leg amputated. He was a great sufferer. He died in 1922. The widow is still living.

We now come to the corner of Main and Stafford Streets. On this corner in the 20's stood the Abner Cole house, later purchased by O. H. Palmer. The old house was moved to a vacant lot on Stafford Street and sold to James Shirtliff. The present house was erected on the corner about 1849. Orin Archer came from Marion to Palmyra, purchased the property and Mr. Palmer moved to Rochester. Mr. Archer at one time was Professor in the Marion school. He had studied law and was admitted to the bar and began the practice of law with the late Colonel Joseph W. Corning as partner, under the firm name Archer & Corning. Their officewas in the old wooden building on the same site of the Jarvis block. Mr. Archer was a staunch Republican and served twice as Member of Assembly. He was a lawyer by profession and an orator by nature. He was a graduate of Williams College and was a proficient Greek and Latin scholar. He died with lung trouble, coupled with paralysis, on February




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24, 1890. His daughter, Mrs. William L. Knapp, is now living at the old homestead.

On the opposite corner, going west, we come to the old Kingsley place, built in the very early 40's. The late Isaac Tabor married one of the daughters and Richard Ford, the butcher, as mentioned before, married the other. At the death of the parents Mr. Ford came into possession of the property. In the 60's the place passed into other hands. It is now owned and occupied by Jacob Cornelius.

The little house on the west built in the 40's by Nathaniel Brooks, has met with several changes. For several years it was occupied by Major John Gilbert. About 1900 the late Henry Harding bought the place. It is now occupied by Earl Bennett.

The vacant lot on the west known as the Sampson lot is the site of the old Shirtliff homestead of 1810. Here the father of James, Silas and Sidney Shirtliff lived. This little, low, one-story, wood-colored double house with two doors in front, has long since been torn down and but very few living today remember it. A granddaughter, Mrs. Hariett Shirtliff Truax, wife of the late Joseph Truax, and daughter of James Shirtliff, is still living but a short distance east of the old homestead at the age of ninety-two years.

Its old neighbor on the west, built only a few years later, has received better care. In the 40's it was occupied by the Hazens; later owned and occupied by the Risleys. In the 70's H. P. Knowles acquired the property and made some improvements. About 1920 Michael Griffin bought the house, put on a coat of paint and made some changes, thus making the old house a nice little cottage. Another old landmark still remains. In the early 40's it was a long, bright red house, owned and occupied by Joseph Johnson, a brick and stone mason. He was a contractor, employing his brother and his son Joseph until he lost a leg and had to retire. At his death his son Joseph came into possession of the property and after his death it was sold to Alfred Hicks, who now owns and occupies the property.

In the 70's two lots were sold off on the west. On the first one Richard Cator built the present house and sold the place to John Anscomb, who died several years ago. The widow is still living on the place. The house on the west was built by the late John Alles who was a scale-maker by trade and worked for the late Joseph Allen for a good many years. After the death of Mr. Alles the place passed into the hands of Irving Young. Now it is owned and occupied by Mr. Cyphers.

Let us now return to Carroll Street, which was laid out and recorded July 8, 1829. The land at that time was owned by Nathaniel Beckwith, brother of George Beckwith, Mr. Beckwith releasing all claims. The street was laid out east of the west line so that a row of lots could be left on the west side of Carroll Street, where he erected a few houses that are still standing. On the corner was Blackmer's blacksmith shop, later occupied by one of the old stone school houses. He lived in a little house that stood on the site of the Boeheim house and was moved in the




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rear for a garage. Back in the 50's an Englishman by the name of Mumford lived in the old house. Later a colored family by the name of Baxter lived here several years until it was sold to give way for the present garage.

Adjoining this on the west in the 40's lived a colored man by the name of Perry Lee, respected by all who knew him. He carried on the barber business a good many years. He was also an old-fashioned "Hoss" doctor as they were called in those days, when such remedies as soft soap for bloat and beef brine to set a bone were called into action.

"Well, Perry, how is the Brown horse?" "Oh, he died. Nothing could save him."

But Perry Lee and all his family have passed away and the name of Perry Lee is forgotten. At his death the property went into the hands of P. T. Sexton. About 1915 George Cornwell purchased the property and later sold to M. F. Cathers who is still living on the place.

Adjoining on the west is another old-time dwelling. In the 60's Miss Cornelia Van Allen owned this house and lot. Later Frank Trumbull of Marion came into possession of it. About 1921 it was sold to Ernest Jones.

The late Morgan Bingham in the 50's lived in the next house. Mr. Bingham went to California in 1849. When he came back he bought this house. At his death which occurred in the 60's the property was sold to Captain White, who was in the jewelry business and was also in the Civil War. In the 70's Roswell Whitney bought the place. After living here several years he sold out and went to California, where he died a few years later. John Kostomer bought the property about 1909. He sold the place to George Cornwell and went to Rochester to live. These two old houses undoubtedly were built about the same time for they were of the same style of those built in the 30's.

Adjoining this on the west in the 40's was the Baptist parsonage, occupied by the late Rev. Daniel Harrington, who remained in Palmyra nearly nine years when he moved away. In the 50's this property came into the possession of William Valton, who was a shoemaker by trade. In the 50's he went into the grocery business on the corner of Main and Williams Streets of which mention has been made before. It is now owned and occupied by Frank C. Jones.

In the neighborhood of this old parsonage are a good many old-time two-story frame houses that were built in the long ago and are of very much the same style of architecture, although the exteriors of some have been changed a little.

But where is the old dooryard fence with its little gate? The gravel walk leading to the front door? The little cozy seats on the platform at the front door and the old door knocker on the front door? All these, like their old-time occupants have had their day and passed on, that other ways and customs may take their place.

As we jog along on our journey we come to the old Thomas Stead home, who lived here in the 50's and was in the photograph business.




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After his death the property passed over to a Mr. Mills and about 1900 Mrs. Louise Converse, mother of F. E. Converse, bought the property and put on a new porch. Mrs. Converse died December 6, 1927, at the age of ninety-seven years.

The next is the narrow two-story old house on the west that stands back from the road. Everything goes to show that this was the home of Benjamin Cole in 1812, brother of Abner Cole. Later it was a cooper shop.
Then again it was fitted up for a dwelling. The late Joseph Johnson lived here in the 60's and Hiram Goodnough in the 70's; Leon Cator, around 1900. Later it was owned by James Cavanaugh, whose daughter still retains the place.

The house adjoining on the west is another old landmark like its neighbor on the east, erected around 1812 and was once the home of John Hurlbut, who was one of Palmyra's early settlers. He at one time owned a good deal of land south of Jackson Street. Mr. Hurlbut married for his second wife, Mrs. Schemerhorn. He helped to layout Main Street.

Some time after Mr. Hurlbut's death, George L. Clark purchased the property. He has had the care of the village cemetery since 1885. Although long years have passed since this house was built, a coat of paint and good care has kept it still looking young.

In 1898 Alembert G. Wigglesworth bought a lot off the west side of the Clark lot and built the present brick house, using the brick and other material that came from the original union school building. A few years later it was sold to Mrs. Floretta Walker and Mr. Wigglesworth went to Utah. A few years later Mrs. Walker sold to W. Ray Converse, a young lawyer, son of F. E. Converse, who is now living there.

Adjoining on the west is another Hurlbut lot on which in 1805 was a distillery, carried on for seven years by Shubel Smith and a man by the name of Harrison from East Palmyra. Here men used to congregate to talk over matters.

At the time the present Zion Episcopal Church was built, which was in the 70's, the Downing brothers bought the old wooden church and moved it upon this lot that they had purchased from George W. Cuyler, with the intentions of erecting a brewery and malt house. This building was made of stone, using timbers of the old church on the inside. A barn was also built. For several years they did a thriving business, malting and making beer. In the 80's they closed out the business and about 1910 Roy D. Fassett purchased the property, tore down the old building, sawed the large timbers into lumber and erected two new houses, keeping one and selling the other to George Case, who later sold to George Cadwallader, who still owns the place. About 1914 Mr. Fassett erected the large garage on the east. Mr. Fassett is a jeweler with a store in the Royce block. When the Downing brothers ran the brewery in the 70's a garage was unknown, the automobile was yet to come. The nice little attractive house on the west was many years ago a




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cooper shop. Later Russell Risley bought the property, converted it into a dwelling house and after a few years another story was added.

This little house was sometimes called the cyclone house from the fact that in the 70's a cyclone passed over, coming from the south. Striking a barn on the Winslow lot across the way, it leveled it to the ground and picking up a 2x4 scantling, whirled it across the street, striking endwise in the gable of this little house, it passed through the house. It also leveled the malt house barn. In the 70's Mr. Risley sold the property and moved to California where he died several years later. Now William Powell has owned and occupied the place for several years. Many changes for the better have been made since it came into his possession. An up-to-date porch has been added, a new chimney on the outside, making the old cooper shop a pleasant and attractive home.

We find as we pass along that we have arrived at the Asa Chase house (4), erected by him in the 60's, later in the 90's owned by John Bulmer. Now it is owned and occupied by George Bernhard and has been for several years.


(1)=Abner Cole; (2)=Jos. Smith; (3)=Zeb Williams; (4)=Asa Chase
(West Palmyra map added -- not printed in original 1930 text)


Our next on the west in 1812 was owned by William Jackway. On this lot (2) was a house and blacksmith shop. Later Levi Daggett occupied both. His daughter Sarah married Henry Wells, prominent in connection with the express business. Later the old shop was torn down and Hiram Jesse and Abigal Jackway owned and occupied the little wood-colored one-story house. Here they all lived until they died, which was in the 70's. The property passed into the hands of a niece, Mrs. Annie Lockrow. About 1912 Jones & Guile bought the property. The old house was torn down and four modern cottages were built upon the lot, owned and occupied by Fred Guile on the east, George Brandetsas, Edward Pfohl and Arthur Breen, the latter living on the west side. Thus another old landmark has gone and the typical old New England cottage has nearly passed from memory.

Our next old-time neighbor on the west is Zebulon Williams, (3) one of the oldest settlers in the village and the first merchant. His store was where the New York Central station now is, which will be pointed out as we advance in our journey. Mr. Williams at one time owned a large tract of land in this neighborhood. The old homestead was a large, two-story, yellow house with a low wing on the west. The main building is still standing but changed beyond recognition. The wing has been torn away and a lot has been sold off the west side where a little cottage was built and occupied by Henry Fox. After the death of Mr. Williams, his son Homer occupied the place for a time. Later a brother, Richard, came into possession of the property. He died in the early 80's. His only child, a daughter, married the late Clark Chase, a son of Willard Chase. The daughter died in the 70's and her husband a few years later. Since Mr. Williams' death the place has changed hands several times. Now it is owned by George Gratton while the Fox house is owned and occupied by Henry Mink.

Our next house on the west was the home of Platt Williams, who




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lived in a story and one-half house way back in the early days. About 1899 a Mr. Ames purchased the old house, tore it down and built a neat little cottage on the site. After living there awhile he sold it to Fred D. Guile and moved away. The cottage passed from Mr. Guile to AlbertChapman and is now owned by Mrs. Lena Chisholm Burns.

The little white house on the west once stood on the site of the Davis block and in 1849 was owned by a man named Anderson, who sold out and moved away. When Mr. Davis purchased the property the house was moved to its present location as mentioned before, while on our journey. It is now owned by Mrs. Augusta Fisher.

In the 70's John Parker came from Walworth, bought the lot and built the next house west. After the death of Mr. Parker and wife, their son John Willis Parker came into possession of the property.

The Gates family built the next house on the west in the 80's. Now it is owned and occupied by William Sabedra and family.

The west line on the next lot was once the west line of the Zebulon Williams land. In the 70's Eugene Smith, a veteran of the Civil War, bought a lot on the west and built this little house. He died in the 70's. After his death Mrs. Nancy Stetson bought the property. Her husband, George Stetson, bought a lot in the very early 70's on the east side of the Bull farm from P. T. Sexton and built the present house where he is still living. Mr. Stetson came to Palmyra and married Nancy Pratt, a daughter of Chloe and Delos Pratt and entered the employ of P. T. Sexton as an assistant in the First National Bank. This position he held until the death of Mr. Sexton in 1924.

We have now covered all that part of the Jackway and Williams property, now covered with buildings. Many have been the changes since those old pioneers passed away. Could they come back to earth they would be at a loss to get their bearings.

We now come to the Bull farm that in the 40's contained about sixty-four acres, Mud Creek being the north line and extending south far enough to make the sixty-four acres. All this land at a very early date belonged to the Jackways.

On the north side of the road and not far from the west line still can be found the site of a cellar wall that once supported a large, one-story, wood-colored New England house, occupied in 1805 by Shubel Smith, who for seven years ran a distillery in company with a man from East Palmyra, as before mentioned.

After many years this property passed into the hands of a man by the name of J. C. Bull, who lived in Canandaigua, and on June 5, 1868, Pliny T. Sexton purchased this property for $10,000.

The old farm barn that stood on the south side of the road back in the field with the same rough siding that was put on over 100 years ago and faithfully shielding the old frame for over a century from the many storms, is gone, but its old companion, a stately elm, standing a little at the north, each in their solitude, watching one another for over a century, has escaped the cyclone and the woodman's ax. The old barn bowed to the fire brand, as a sacrifice to patriotic enthusiasm.




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On the north side of the street is a remnant of an old orchard that no doubt has long since passed the century mark, although neglected and unnoticed by most people, yet at each returning spring time following their old-time custom, they decorate themselves with seeming pride, with just as handsome and fragrant blossoms as when in their prime. Although the old bodies grow weaker and weaker as the years go by, they still demonstrate to the young it is better to wear out than rust out.

The old wood-colored New England house that was guarded by these same old trees, furnishing fruit and flowers each in their turn, has long since passed into history. And while we linger around this silent and deserted spot, we find the same old spring that was back of the house, still. flowing from the hillside, clear and cold as it did over one hundred and twenty years ago when it supplied the inmates of this old home.

A little depression in the ground and a few stones which belonged to the old cellar and a few brick scattered here and there that 'belonged to the old fireplace where the family gathered around to enjoy its evening glow, is the only evidence which marks the spot where once stood a pioneer's home.

Not far from the front door of this dwelling, about 1860, a cold-blooded murder was committed. James Bailey, a farmer living northwest of Walworth, came to Palmyra one day with a load of wood, bringing two or three other men with him. After selling the wood and just before going home, he and his companions imbibed rather too freely and just before reaching this house while on the way home, they met Patrick Kelley and Mr. Sheridan, who were going along on the sidewalk. The latter was living in the old house and while passing, in some way they exchanged words which led to an altercation. Mr. Sheridan said something that displeased Mr. Bailey. The latter grabbed a stake from the wood rack and started for them. Mr. Bailey being a powerful man, dealt a heavy blow upon Mr. Sheridan which resulted in his death.

Mrs. John Coppins, who lived in the old house, saw the fracas, making her a valuable witness. Mr. Bailey was arrested. The trial was adjourned from time to time. The Civil War had just broken out and Mr. Coppins moved to a little house he had bought on the south end of Fayette Street. After moving his falnily he enlisted in the army.

Mr. Bailey had now sold his farm and was staying with his daughter near Canandaigua. Again the trial was about to come off and Mrs. Coppins was the important witness. A short time before the case was to be tried, Mr. Bailey came to Palmyra.

Mrs. Coppins was now, living alone. The next morning after Mr. Bailey had been in town, Mrs. Coppins was found dead in her house. On examination it was decided that she had been strangled to death by some unknown person. Suspicion was centered upon Mr. Bailey. He was again arrested and so hotly pursued he took something to end his life.

Here we have portrayed to us the evil of strong drink. When Mr. Bailey was himself he was not a quarrelsome man. He was a good neighbor, a kind husband and an indulgent father. He had two children, a son




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and daughter. The son was a fine, large, good-looking young man and respected by all who knew him. This disgrace he keenly felt. He went to New York and made good.

Long years have passed since this melancholy and fatal event and it is revealed only by the glimmering light of history. A good many years ago the old house was burned and is remembered only by a few. At the death of Mr. Sexton this tract of land on both sides of the road was sold, John Lauer buying a part to the north where he has erected a fine new bungalow and that on the south being purchased by William W. Williamson. Mr. Williamson has laid out two streets, each seventy feet wide. Lots have been measured off, giving plenty of room to build. The streets are so wide and the lots so generous that in time this will be the most desirable resident place in the village. Mr. Williamson has erected a gas station and two houses have been built on the east facing Main Street. One is occupied by Isaac Cook and the other by Luther Sheldon. Just west of the gas station William Eibler has erected a fine house which he is now occupying.

Just a little to the west on the south side of the road and back from the road was a house on which hung a sign "Jackway, the Hatter." West of here is the Aldrich homestead which has been enlarged since 1812. Dr. Gain Robinson lived here. His office and drug store was some distance in front, not far from the trolley stop. He was a successful doctor but at times rather intemperate.

The story was told that one time when called on a case, upon his arrival the family thought he was in no condition to examine the patient and suggested to him that he lie down for awhile on the couch. He replied, "I will when it comes around again."

In 1851 the late David Aldrich bought the property. Here he lived a good many years and brought up a large family. Mr. Aldrich was born in Mendon, Mass., in 1813, removing thence at an early day. The family settled in Farmington, this state. After a few years he came to Palmyra as clerk in a store where he remained until 1830. It was during this time that while a clerk in the post office, then situated in a dry goods store, he sold to the Mormon Prophet, Joseph Smith, his first decent suit of clothes.

Coming to this country at an early date he lived to see it advance from a small hamlet and pasture lands into handsome streets, filled with commodious homes. He died in September, 1882. His family have all passed away. The property is now owned by Michael Grace. We are now at the end of Main Street. Let us now take a stroll down Fayette Street. Before Palmyra was called Swift's Landing, the Ganargua Indians had a trail down through the woods where Fayette Street now is, continuing south up over Crandall's Hill and continuing its course to the western slope at the foot of Bear Hill and on south, keeping about forty rods east of the present Canandaigua Road until it came to the present Jacob Kommer farm; then bearing off to the southwest, coming out at Miner's corners and still following on south where




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the Canandaigua Road now is, to an Indian reservation near what is now Dr. Pratt's house in the village of Manchester, thence on to Canandaigua. More will be said of this trail as we advance in our journey. This trail was gradually widened out and finally made into a street, but not regularly laid out and surveyed until 1829, when it was named Fayette Street in honor of General Lafayette, who came to visit this country, landing in New York August 15, 1825.



Fayette Street - between Main and Jackson Streets

Beginning on the east side at the two old wooden stores that belong to the Clemons estate: Several years ago one of these old stores caught fire. In the second story that was reached by an outside stairway, lived a colored man by the name of George Ballard, who at one time had been a slave. When the fire broke out he was aroused and on his way out, in coming down the stairs, he made a misstep and fell to the bottom of the stairs and was so badly hurt he expired right away. The funeral was held from the Baptist Church of which he was a faithful member. It was a large funeral for he was a man respected by all who knew him. It is very seldom that we see more flowers at a funeral than were brought here by the citizens out of respect for this old colored man.

Adjoining this on the south is the former tobacco factory of the Williamson Brothers, now occupied by the Palmyra Hardware store. Beyond are two small brick houses built in the 40's by William H. Bowman. Since they were built they have had a good many different owners and tenants. Now they are owned by William Campbell. Just south were the old livery barns of Gates and Thompson and previous to their ownership they were owned by Mahlon Kinman, who was proprietor of a stage line between this place and Rochester as mentioned before. Henry Bump, in the 70's, had a stable here for several years. But the trolley and automobile killed the business. Now it is used for a garage.

Our next is the hotel barns. Since the hotel barns across the way were burned and just south of the hotel barns which have been torn down, stands a little white house owned by Mrs. Jessie Powers, wife of the late Andrew Powers, who for a good many years was the proprietor of the Powers Hotel. About 1912 Mr. Powers sold out and moved to California, where he died in 1924. Just beyond was the wagon shop of Alanson Sherman who came here in the 30's * and went into the carriage business. Later A. P. Crandall became a partner. It then went under the firm name of Sherman & Crandall and for a good many years did an extensive business in making sleighs, wagons and fine carriages. They employed a good many men. At this shop all parts were made from the rough to the finished product of wood, iron, paint and upholstering. Mr. Sherman's brother Rhodes, Elisha Lewis and Charles Wilber did the iron work and Mr. Shannon did the trimming. The latter had the distinction of upholstering the first railroad coach in the state. Out of all that army of men not one is living now.

After the death of Mr. Sherman and the business closed up, Mr. Wilber opened up a blacksmith shop in the old Bingham shop on Canal Street. He was a fine workman and a good mechanic, being the last one of the old shophands living. About 1917 he retired from business on

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* Transcriber's note: "Alanson Shearman" is listed on the 1830 US Census records for Palmyra township. Four different "Shermans" are listed on the 1820 records, indicating that Alanson either arrived between 1820 and 1830, or that in 1820 he was not the head of a household.




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account of poor health. At his death he lived in a neat little cottage which he built on West Main Street. He died about 1921.

Mr. Sherman and Mr. Crandall were prominent men in the village. Mr. Sherman lived in the large two-story house south of the brook while across the way in a brick house next to the brook lived his partner, Mr. Crandall. Now the place is owned and occupied by the daughter of an adopted son.

After the death of these two men the business was closed out and the old shops where so many had found employment for so many years were torn down. Just north of the brook and just south, new homes have been erected. In the small house south of these once lived one of Mr. Sherman's sons. Across the way stood the old Anderson tannery. The building stood north and south with the south end partly over the brook.

All the houses north of the shop were built in the 70's by Robert Hale on the site of the old hotel barns that had been burned. The Shimmins house that stands over the brook was at one time the Sherman and Crandall show room and paint shop.

After Sherman and Crandall had gone out of business, his brother Rhodes Sherman and Elisha Lewis built a shop north of the Shimmins house and carried on blacksmithing until by reason of old age they retired from business. John Shimmins, who was a blacksmith, bought the shop and moved from the old Bingham shop on Canal Street. In this shop he worked until his death which occurred in 1922.

The brick house south of the Shimmins house was the home of A. P. Crandall. The well-kept grounds and beautiful flower garden made a very pleasant home. Mr. Crandall had one daughter who married George D. Downing and lived on the old Downing homestead west of the village. Now not one of the above-named persons is living. The Crandall homestead is owned and occupied by a daughter of an adopted son, Mrs. Cady-Hazelton.

Mr. Sherman had four sons who have all passed away and not one bearing the name of Sherman is now living here. The Sherman property on the east side of the street is now owned and occupied by others. Near the Sherman property was one of the fire engine houses.

Adjoining the old Sherman property was the home of Samuel Cole, who published a paper called the Whig. This was in the 40's. Many others have since lived here.

Our next in the 40's was the old Pomeroy Tucker house. In the 70's the late F. W. Clemons purchased the property and bought the old Abe Martin house that stood on Main Street and moved it to give way for a new house built by Dr. Myron Adams as mentioned before. This old house was moved south of the Tucker house in the same yard. It is now owned and occupied by Edson Shaw while the old Tucker house is owned and occupied by Mrs. Charles Jackman.




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The brick house on the south is now owned by the Wardlaw family, as it has been for a good many years.

On the south is the old Merill homestead. Mr. Merill worked for Mr. Sherman in the carriage shop a good many years. At his death a son-in-law, William Parsons, came into possession of the property. At his death it passed to Ray Chisholm. It is now owned by others.

On the corner [with Jackson St.] is the Solomon Crowell house, in the 40's. Later it was owned by Jerry Bernett and later by John Strain of Lyons.

Returning to the Crandall property on the west side of the street: Next comes the old Gardner house which is now owned by Miss Nellie Crandall, daughter of the late Giles Crandall, who owned the place while living. Mr. Crandall was a cabinet maker by trade, having learned his trade in the Jenner shop. For a good many years he kept a furniture store on Main Street. He was also an undertaker.

The brick house on the south in the 30's was owned by Amos Miner, and later by Lorenzo Sanders and many others. Among some of them were George Stoddard, Hiram Clark and Joseph Blaby, the latter dying in 1925, and the place was sold to Mr. Miller.
Another old landmark is still standing just south. These two old houses have been neighbors for a good many years and this was the home of the late William H. Bowman as mentioned before. This place is now owned by a granddaughter, Mrs. Mary Bowman Lawrenee.

Our next is where once lived L. G. Buckley, the harness maker, as before mentioned. His daughter, Mrs. H. G. White, now owns and occupies the place.

The little brick house on the corner [with Jackson St.] was the Solomon Carter house as before mentioned; owned by the heirs of the late Judge Charles McLouth.

Many have been the changes of the occupants of these old-time houses in this little block, but most of them retain their old-time appearance of eighty years ago. The old people have passed away and the only remnant of those old-time people are the Bowmans and Buckleys.

Fayette Street, South of Jackson Street

Suppose we venture a little further south on Fayette Street. Our first house on the east side of the street is the William Bump place, who kept the livery stable. Mr. Bump built this house here in the 70's and lived here until his death, which occurred about 1908. His wife died a few years later and the property passed into other hands.

Our next house was owned by Alanson Sherman in the 50's; later by P. T. Sexton and now by Harry Cottenham. In the late 60's Maltby Easterly built the two houses on the south. The first of these is owned by Cyrus DeFlyer and the second by Sanford Miller.

Our next house is the old Linnell house that in the 50's stood on East Main Street near where the brick house now stands as mentioned before. About 1908 Robert Hart bought the place and about 1917 he sold the place to Corneil Cleason, whose widow still lives here.

The house on the south was built by Mr. Easterly and afterward came into the possession of Mrs. P. J. Jones who died in 1922 at nearly




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one hundred years of age and the place passed into other hands. Now it is owned and occupied by the Tomes family.

The next house was in the 60's owned by a Mr. Minters, who was an Englishman, spending the most of his time in New York, while a son-in-law, Benjamin Lodge lived in the house and later the Jenks family, Charles Vedder, Orlopp, VanHanahan and Orlopp again.

The brick house which was built by a Mr. Bullard is now occupied by Peter Crowley.

Our next house was built by Mr. Easterly, father of Maltby Easterly. Mr. Johnson, a tanner by trade, came from Macedon, followed by Melvin Galloway; later owned by a daughter, Mrs. Mary Stacy and now by Isaac McGee.

Joseph Eibler built the next house in the 80's and also owned the one on the south. In 1896 he sold out to T. L. Cook and moved to Illinois. These houses have changed hands several times. Now Roy Everett owns the north house and Thomas Hughes owns the one on the south.

Now let us return to Jackson Street corner and call on the west side of Fayette Street. Our first house in the 60's was the Mrs. Major house, for the last twenty years owned and occupied by Eugene Lake, who after buying the place, remodeled the house and now has a tidy little home.

Our next is the William Steadman place, now owned and occupied by the DeChard family. Our next house on the south was at one time owned by Fred Hale, then by the Gates family and now by William Storr.

Our next in the 40's was owned by Darius Kittel, who was a cartman. In the 50's the late George Goodell owned the property. Mr. Goodell was for a good many years a butcher with his market on Market Street. Now it is owned by Mrs. Niles.

Our next was built by Elisha Lewis, a veteran of the Civil War. After coming back from the war he bought this lot and built the house. Mr. Lewis was a blacksmith as mentioned before. At his death his daughter, Mrs. Kennard, came into possession of the property. Now it is owned by G. Edward Sanders.

Adjoining this is the old Jackway property. After his death in the 90's it has been owned by different ones. Among some of the owners are Howard Jackson, Brulee and Leonard DeWitt.

The large two-story house on the south in the 50's was owned by Isaac Gifford. About 1866, Timothy Jackson, a native of Fairfield, Herkimer County, New York, came to Palmyra and was for a good many years engaged in the insurance business. After buying this house he enlarged and remodeled it. He died in 1886 and his daughter Anna has carried on the business successfully ever since. Mrs. Jackson died in 1922 at the age of 96 years.

The little house on the south is where lived Rhodes Sherman, whose name has been mentioned before. Mr. Sherman came to Palmyra in the 30's. He died in the 90's. His daughter Mary came into possession of the




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property. In 1925 she passed away, she being the last of the Shermans Now William Contant lives here.

The late Thomas Hicks in the 70's, built the next house on the south. Later he sold the place to Lewis M. Chase who still owns and occupies it.

On the corner [at Walker St.] at a very early date, stood a home occupied a long time by the Ray family. Around 1900 the old house was torn down to give way for the present house, the front of which was moved from Main Street and was once the Thomas Douglass home as before mentioned. This house was moved here by John Shimmins, who bought the lot and put on the addition. Later it was sold to Mrs. Eleanor Gowling, who has since passed away. The same old columns are still doing service on the porch that they did several years ago.

Just west on the hill on Walker Street we see a neat little house where in the very early 40's lived Tommy Brown, the whitewasher, who was an expert at the business and was called "Whitewasher Brown." In those days in cleaning house time he was in great demand, for all walls in well regulated families had to be whitewashed. At his death the place passed into other hands and the na.me of Tommy Brown is forgotten. Among some of the owners were David Heath, Pinckney and Henry Runterman, who is still living on the place.

Many and varied are the changes of eighty years ago. Houses now occupy vacant lots. The old people have passed away and there is no one left in this neighborhood to tell the story of long ago.

Looking south we can see standing upon the hill, a two-story house, once the home of Samuel Adams, who was a painter. When the Civil War broke out he enlisted and died while in the army. A few years ago his wife died. Now Albert Powers owns the property. Mr. Powers, a carpenter, has erected four houses to the south of his home. The first is owned by Dennis Cook; the second by William Jones; the third by James O'Brien and the fourth is still owned by Powers but occupied by others.

Just south of the Hughes place was once the home of Giles B. Crandall, later moved further north as mentioned before. Among the different owners were John Ennis, Charles Nelson and James Mitten at the present.

Adjoining on the south is the old Crandall homestead. Mr. Crandall came here in an early day and he was a cabinet maker by trade as well as all four of his sons. At his death a son, Charles, took the property and lived here and brought up his family. At his death, a daughter who married Frederick Gates, bought the property. At this purchase the time at last came when a change was to be made in this old homestead. At the time this house was built and for many years after, this was at the head of Fayette Street. Two new cottages stand on the same frontage and the old homestead has passed away and is forgotten. The south house was sold to William O'Brien, who now owns and occupies the property. Emil DeSmith owns the other house.

Passing on, our next house is where Jacob Ziegler lived in the late 60's. Later he moved to Market Street where he carried on blacksmithing for many years. Mr. Ziegler was a native of Germany and a veteran of the Civil




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War. He came to Palmyra when a young man. All who knew him can say he was a true patriot. Marvin Dailey now owns and occupies the place. The brick house on the south was built by Washington Sherman in the early 50's. At his death it passed into other hands. Among some of them were Selleck and Frank Vandewater, who has made a good many improvements, besides building a large evaporator where he dries large quantities of apples each year. Mr. Vandewater has had charge of the village water works for a good many years.

The late Thomas L. Root lived in the next house. In the 70's he sold out and moved to Canandaigua Street where he died in the 80's. This place, like a good many others, has met with many changes. It is now a double house and is owned by Peter Burke.

The next two houses on the south were erected by Joshua Lawrence for business purposes. The one on the corner he used for a blacksmith shop in which he worked, while the other was used for a carriage shop. He himself, lived in a little old house that is now owned by Mrs. Nellie Coughlin, just east of the shop. The house has been rebuilt. Mr. Lawrence was a veteran of the Civil War and died in the 90's. The large shops have been converted into dwellings. The place on the corner [at Spring. St.] is owned by John Geldof, while the one to the north is owned by Louis Gratton.

Two little houses were built by the late George Brown in the 70's. These are on the south side of Spring Street, while the other two came from back of the trolley station, and were built and owned by Joseph Williamson.

After passing the Jeffery house on the corner the first house we see is owned and occupied by Patrick Hickey; the second by Mrs. Mary Tilburg; third, by the heirs of Daniel O'Brien.

The next, which was erected here very recently is owned and occupied by Fay Bacon, while the last, which is one of the two houses that were moved here, is owned and occupied by George Burke.

Next to the Coughlin house, across the way, is the pumping station for the Palmyra Water Department. Frank J. Vandewater, Superintendent of the Water Department, lives in the house adjoining the station.

On the southeast corner of Fayette and Spring Streets stands a house built and occupied by a Mr. Zipful, who was a blacksmith. It is now owned and occupied by Isaac Jeffery, who has added a new porch.

The old Ashley Hibbard house is still standing on the south, looking finer and more modern than when first built. Now it is owned and occupied by others.

This was originally the end of Fayette Street, but it was lengthened to intersect Foster Street when that street was laid out in the 70's. John Coppins, a war veteran, as mentioned before, whose wife was murdered, lived in a little house on the corner [at Foster St.]. At his death Peter Vanderwege purchased the property and built three fine cottages on the lot. Elmer Hibbard owns and occupies the first, Fred Race the second, and Peter Vanderwege the one on the corner.

The large two-story house across the way [on Fayette St.] was built in the 70's by Joseph Benedict, later sold to Mary Breen. At her death it was sold to Jacob





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Cuyler. Mr. Benedict was a veteran of the Civil War. He died in 1925, being over 90 years old.

The little house on the corner was owned in the 60's by Asher Cray, later by John Trumbull and now by Frederick Black.

We have now arrived at the end of Fayette Street. Let us return to Jackson Street.

Jackson Street

This street did not come legally into existence until April 28, 1829, when its survey and description were adopted by the trustees of the village. The survey of the extension to the east of Fayette Street having been recinded in December, 1830, that portion of Jackson Street did not become a street until 1869, when Jackson and Catherine Streets were united by Sexton Street. In 1928 the course was changed and it was renamed Prospect Drive. Later we will find a more accurate description in the survey of streets.

As Jackson Street seems to be our next street to visit, suppose we start at the southeast corner of Jackson and Fayette. Near the corner stands two brick houses, erected in or near the 40's by the late William H. Bowman. In the 60's the late Marcus C. Finley purchased the corner house. Mr. Finley was a native of the town of Walworth, N. Y. He was born on what is known as Finley Hill, two miles noth of the village of Walworth. Here on this hill his father, John Finley, and an uncle, Reuben Finley, came and settled at an early date, each owning a large farm. Each raised a large family. Marcus received his early education at the district school and Walworth Academy, part of the time being employed as teacher. He also attended school at Lima, teaching school winters to defray the expense while getting his education. Later he studied law and was admitted to the bar and located in Palmyra. In the 60's he married Helen, a daughter of Albert G. Myrick. He held several town offices, among them school commissioner, Justice of the Peace and he was for a good many years Police Justice; also an assessor for both town and village. He died in 1911 at the age of eighty-one years and the property passed into the hands of his son-in-law, Samuel II. Hunt. Now it is owned by Abram Tilburg.

In the 50's Miss Emily Jarvis, daughter of the late William Jarvis, married Jackson Mirick of Lyons. Shortly after their marriage they moved to Jordan "There Mr. Mirick became engaged in the milling business. After his death which occurred in the 60's, Mrs. Mirick came back to Palmyra and purchased the little brick house west of the Finley house. Here she lived and brought up her family. At her death, which occurred in 1922, the homestead went to her daughter, Mrs. Hattie Mirick Elton, who still owns and occupies the place.

Our next place on the west in the 40's was the residence of the late Dr. May. At his death, which occurred in the 60's, the property was sold to Uria S. Milliman, who was a veterinary surgeon. Mr. Milliman came from Walworth and was a native of Avon, N. Y. In the 90's Mr. Milliman sold out and moved to Michigan where he died a few years later. About 1905 the late Frank Holway bought the property and built a new house on




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the east side of the lot. A few years later Mr. and Mrs. Holway died. The last house is now owned and occupied by Howard Jackson, while the old May house is owned by Frank Fish. Away back in 1835, across the way where a little cottage now stands, was erected a stone schoolhouse which was used for a district school until the Union School house was built. For many years after it had served its purpose for a school house, it was occupied by William Gardner as a dwelling house. Later it was owned and occupied by Julius M. McLain. After his death, Judge Charles McLouth bought the property, tore down the old stone house and built a neat little cottage on the same site. Now Charles McLouth, jr., lives here.

Now if you will please follow me we will go to the north end of Cuyler Street to Main Street. We will start on the east side of Cuyler Street and go south and return on the west side.

A brief mention has been made of the old William Howe Cuyler homestead that stood just south of the Jarvis block and north of the old church and back from the road. It was a typical old New England house, long and low. In the 30's when Mr. William Jarvis purchased the property, the old house was used as a tenant house and in the 50's the north end was occupied by John Milbank and the south end by James Shirtliff. These tenants occupied this house for several years until the fire of 1876, when the old house was burned to the ground, meeting the same fate of the neighbors on the north. Thus has passed away another old land mark that will be known only in history.

At a very early date Mr. Cuyler owned a strip of land on the east side of Cuyler Street, extending as far south as Cyrus Foster's north line. At that time no houses dotted this landscape. Neighbors' cows and pigs were permitted to roam at large over the same ground where now stands palatial homes with tidy yards, furnishing fruit and flowers each in their season as we shall see as we pass along.

In the front yard stands a bowling alley, while a little further south stood the old M. E. Church of which mention will be made later. On the same site of the garage once stood the house of William Cuyler, son of William Howe Cuyler. At his death the place went to decay. The place was sold, the old house was torn down and a garage has been erected on the same site. Mr. Cuyler kept a hat and fur store on the north side of Main Street, where the Cuyler block now is, and the old store stands on the north side of Williams Street and was used as a carpenter shop as mentioned before. Now it has been torn down. Not one of this family is living.

Adjoining this on the south was another old land mark of the '30's. In the early 50's the late Kingsley Miller owned and occupied this property. At Mr. Miller's death the property was sold to Reeves Culver who was a fine carpenter. He sold the old house to Hannah Sexton which she moved to Church Street to keep company with the old Beecher house that stands in the rear and built the present house on the site of the old one. At Mr. Culver's death William Williamson purchased the property. He was a veteran of the Civil War. He was in the cigar business with his brother




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John K. Williamson on Fayette Street as mentioned before. Mr. Williamson died about 1905. His widow is still living at the same place.

As early as in the 30's the late Wells Anderson, who was a shoe merchant and tanner at one time, with store on Main Street, lived in the next house south. In this house he lived and brought up his family. At his death B. T. Babbitt, the soap king, purchased this property, moved the old house back and put a large two-story front on. After a few years Mrs. F. E. Candee acquired the property and lived here a good many years. At her death which occurred about 1919, the place was sold to Thomas Birdsall who made a good many improvements on the property. He now owns and occupies the place. Mrs. Candee was a natiVe of Palmyra. Her maiden name was F. E. Ackley and at one time she was a teacher in the Union School.

Our next house was in the 30's, the home of Thomas Birdsall, grandfather to the Thomas Birdsall previously mentioned, one of the leading merchants on Main Street. At his death which occurred in the 60's the homestead came into the hands of his son, Henry, who died in the 90's. His widow, Mrs. Charlotte Jenner Birdsall, is still living on the place. About 1900 Mrs. Birdsall moved the old house on a vacant lot on Charlotte Avenue to make way for a more beautiful and attractive home on the same site of the old one. Mrs. Birdsall is still living and enjoying the comforts of the new house, surrounded by her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren.

The next neighbor on the south was Mrs. Mary Anne Woodward, who built a little Gothic cottage near the ravine. After living here a few years, she took a trip to Europe, and rented her little cottage to Myron Pardee; later to Albert G. Hemingway, followed by Mrs. Henry Gardner. After spending a few years in Europe she returned. She was wealthy and well educated and was possessed of high literary attainments, but being a very eccentric person, her acquaintance was confined to a small circle of personal friends. For many years prior to her death, she arranged even the minute details of her funeral, and left written instructions to her nephew, Daniel C. Lillie, to be carried out at her death, and Mrs. Charlotte Birdsall, a near neighbor and intimate friend, assisted him in doing so.

In hopes that they may prove of benefit in this extravagant age of funerals, we give a few of the details followed at her funeral: The coffin was not to exceed in cost ten dollars, and was to be a black box, with trunk handles, and she was to be laid out in a calico dress, which Mrs. Birdsall personally superintended; no hearse in attendance, no carriages, no sermon, no singing. After the reading of the scriptures, prayer and brief remarks by Rev. Horace Eaton, the plain coffin was placed upon a bier, and four colored pallbearers, whom she had chosen, namely, John Baxter, George Ballard, Frank Bogart and Andrew Foster, on foot, bore the remains to their final resting place for which, according to her request, each received a five-dollar gold piece for their services, which she had laid aside for that purpose. She also requested not to exceed twenty guests to be invited to attend the services. No time was set for the funeral. Mrs. Irving Eggleston,




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Mrs. Charlotte Birdsall, Dr. Horace Eaton and Daniel C. Lillie followed the bearers on foot. But, however, it was thought best by Mr. Lillie and Mrs. Birdsall to secure one carriage, for the convenience of Mrs. Allen Thayer, who was too old, and too feeble to walk, who was accompanied by Mrs. Eaton.

Her grave was prepared and tombstone erected many years ago. She left Dr. Horace Eaton $500 in her will. There was poetry and power in the march of those sable pallbearers, as they carried their benefactress to her burial.

Mrs. Woodward left the strong to stand in their own might. The neglected and depressed drew her sympathies and help. Her watch word was "the survival of the weakest." While residing in New Orleans she saw that slavery was a bitter draught. She took stock in the underground railway. At a large price she bought a female slave, and set her at liberty. Her solicitudes and charities never ceased to go forth in behalf of the education and elevation of the men her influence contributed to make free. She died June 20, 1881 at the age of eighty-seven years.

After the death of Mrs. Woodward, Norton Gardner bought the property and after living here with his parents until about 1889, sold the same to Mosher Story and William Rogers, his son-in-law, occupied the cottage for eight years until the death of his wife, when he moved away. Then Mr. Story moved the little cottage to the corner of Charlotte Avenue and Hathaway Place and built the present fine residence in 1898, and gave it to his daughter Frances, who married the late Frank Hutchins, who was a clerk for many years in the M. Story Dry Goods Store until the death of Mr. Story. Then a co-partnership was formed in the business by the old clerks of which Mr. Hutchins was a member. He died several years ago, his wife retaining her interest in the firm and still living and enjoying the blessings of her beautiful home and thrifty family.

When Mr. Story came into possession of this property he measured off a suitable lot to go with the cottage and sold the remainder of the lot to Wright Gardner, who built the present house in the 70's on the south. After living here a short time he sold out to W. H. H. Osborn and went West. Mr. Osborn was at one time in the insurance business with Hiram Clark, a veteran of the Civil War, and later had a mince meat factory and coal yard on Railroad A venue in a wooden building a little northeast of the gas house, which has since been torn down. He, being an enterprising man, built a culvert over the brook, and filled in the ravine, thus making a great improvement in the property. After living here a few years he sold the property to Robert H. Bareham, who has been a lifelong resident of Palmyra and one of the oldest business men, having carried on the bakery business since he was a young man. He is now living in this pleasant home which is made attractive by plants, shrubs and flowers.

But who remembers the little yellow cottage, the wild ravine and the brook? We looK in vain to see the old plank bridge that spanned the little stream that crossed the highway and the old long wooden foot-bridge, across the ravine, used as a sidewalk, with its rickety guard rail. We look




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in vain to see the little wild ravine, for it has been filled in and leveled off and the little brook is hidden from view by an archway that covers the stream. This little wild spot that is now level with the land on either side and covered with a mantle of green, is remembered only by the grandfathers and grandmothers of today.

Passing on we come to the house where in the 50's lived the widow of Dr. Eggleston. After her death her son Irving built a new house. He died in the 80's. Now it is owned and occupied by Walter P. Smith, a jeweler by trade and engaged in the business with Charles Ziegler as partner and the firm name is "Smith & Ziegler."

Near 1880, Hon. Charles McLouth, who lived in the house east of the Episcopal Church, wishing to build a new house, chose for the site on which to build, the corner of Jackson and Cuyler Streets. He bought two lots on Cuyler Street, one where Col. Joseph W. Corning lived; also the Peter Huyck place. The Corning house was moved to west Jackson Street and the Huyck house was moved to the Amos Sanford lot on Canandaigua Street. The little hood over the front door looks very much the same as in the 40's, while the porch columns that were sawed out of plank on the Corning house look just the same as when on Cuyler Street. For nearly forty years Mr. McLouth was permitted to enjoy this beautiful home. He was a native of Walworth, received his education at the Walworth Academy, came to Palmyra in the 50's, studied with the late William Aldrich in the little office north of Sexton's bank, admitted to the bar and practiced law until his death, which occurred in 1917, at the age of eighty-three years. He was an able lawyer and a good citizen.

But let us pause for a moment and view the ground we have just passed over since we left Main Street and roll back the tide of seventy years. We find not a single one living here that lived here then. They all have passed away and if by chance the young man or woman that went away seventy years ago should return to the home of their childhood they would not find on the east side of Cuyler Street a single house standing that stood here then. The old wooden bridge and the brook and the ravine would be hidden from their view. But iif they turn their eye to the west they will see the same innocent little brook that now, as in days gone by, in the Spring of the year, like the river Jordan, when on a rampage, it sweeps everything before it, as it did little Russell Bareham when a very small boy, who was playing with some other children at the upper end of the culvert and accidentally slipped into the rushing torrent. He was soon washed down out of sight. The children at once gave the alarm, and an older brother ran to the lower end, a distance of nearly two hundred feet and caught him when he came through. They were all crying. He said, "What are you all crying about? I am all right."

This little brook still goes gliding on its way from its fountain to the seas as in days gone by, leaving a sweet impression on many a child that waded in its stream or sported upon its bank.

No other block in the village furnished as many young men for the European War as this little block on Cuyler Street. Eight young men




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cheerfully answered their country's call, Karl Lebrecht, Lucian and Nelson Bareham went across while the others went into the training camp, ready to go at a moment's notice, but the war closed suddenly and the boys were not needed.

Across the way in the old brick house just north of the brook, lived a young lady by the name of Margaret Stevens, who had lived in Palmyra nearly all her life and was for a long time a teacher in the Union School. This young lady, at the election in the Fall of 1918, had the distinction of putting her name unconsciously into history by being the first woman to cast the suffragette vote in town. Thus another honor to the little block.

John Rushmore, about the year 1906, bought of Carlton C. Hunt, on the southeast corner of Cuyler and Jackson Streets, a lot on which to build the present fine house. Mr. Rushmore belonged to a family of Quakers who were among the first settlers of the town of Farmington. In the 70's his father sold his farm in the town of Farmington and came to Palmyra to live. When John was a young man he kept a drug store on Main Street for several years, just west of the hotel, but with failing health the care of his large farms and the drug store was too great a burden. About 1914 he sold the drug business, retaining the real property until about 1923, when he sold the entire property to D. W. Briggs, who had previously bought from him the drug business.

Farther south upon the hill, with the same commanding view as when Major George W. Cuyler in the 40's lived here, this old-fashioned house with mansard roof is now owned by a grandson, Carlton C. Hunt, who has kept it looking very much as it was in his grandfather's day. Mr. Hunt spends his Winters in Florida, coming North to the old homestead in the Summer.

Very different is its neighbor on the south where the late Judge Strong lived in the 40's, in this old colonial house with his law office on Walker Street. About 1850, Mr. Strong sold out and moved West. Shortly after leaving Palmyra, his son Hart Strong was stopping at a hotel in a western city. The hotel caught fire and their son perished in the flames. After Mr. Strong moved away Albert Wells lived here for awhile; also Wells Tyler who at one time was in the clothing business and in the 70's kept the post office. After living on the place a few years he sold out and moved to Rochester, then to Detroit, Mich., and after his wife's death went to Baltimore to live with his son Lewis Smith rryler. When a young man he was a clerk for several years in the Birdsall & Sanford store. About 1898 the late William H. Kent purchased the property, which through neglect had become quite dilapidated. He repaired the house and cleaned up the grounds and restored it more in keeping with its former appearance. He sold the little office which was moved to West Jackson Street and can now be seen in a yard just east of the fair grounds.

Mr. Kent, six or seven years later, sold his large farm situated tnreefourths of a mile north of the Yellow Mills, to the New York Central Railroad Company for the gravel. A few years later he sold the old colonial home and moved to California. A few years later his wife died and he




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then returned to Palmyra where he died a few years later. Mr. Kent sold the property on Cuyler Street to Thomas Trull and Frank Hutchins. The lot was then divided, Mr. Trull taking the house and barn and Mr. Hutchins taking the south half on which he built the little cottage on Walker Street, later owned by Mrs. Christina Stell. After the death of Mr. Hutchins the vacant lot was sold to Charles Ziegler on which he erected the present modern cottage. Mr. Trull built the fine house on the north and sold the old homestead to George P. Baker, who keeps it for a summer home. These two new and modern houses and the old colonial house restored to its early appearance, makes South Cuyler Street the most attractive and park-like street in the village.

The fine large brick house at the south end of Cuyler Street was built by Egbert B. Granden in the 20's. At the time this house was built it was very much smaller than at the present time. As soon as 1830 the property came into the possession of Otis Clapp. Mr. Granden came from the Ziegler house on the north end of the Whitely block on Market Street.
Some time in the late 30's Mr. Clapp sold to James Walker, sr., who shortly after coming to Palmyra became engaged in the hardware business with Martin Butterfield. In the 60's Mr. Walker sold the place to Hon. Henry R. Durfee and moved away. Mr. Durfee, after living here a few years, sold to the late Allyn F. Goldsmith, who left his farm in Port Gibson to live a retired life, but after the novelty had worn away and an idle life had lost its charm, he longed to go back to the old farm that had furnished him with food and clothing for so many years. He sold this little handful of brick and clay to James Walker, jr., who was equally anxious to come back to the home of his childhood.

On his large fine farm, Mr. Goldsmith spent the rest of his life peaceful, contented and happy. After the death of Mr. Goldsmith, a daughter, Kate, came into possession of the farm and now owns the old homestead. The house and out buildings have been remodeled and repaired and made into an attractive home. When the Barge Canal went through a beautiful lake was made by overflowing a large tract of land. This sheet of water is in plain sight of the old homestead. With Miss Goldsmith's business ability, she has made the old home a delightful spot.

After Mr. Walker had purchased the old homestead, he enlarged the house and made extensive improvements. About 1900 this property passed into the hands of Nelson G. Drake by deed from Mrs. Floretta Walker and then to Pliny T. Sexton, who about 1906 sold the same to Samuel Hall Hunt, a grandson of the late George W. Cuyler. Again the h0use was extensively remodeled and with this beautiful view and standing at the head of Cuyler Street, it makes a very desirable location.

For many years this location was in the shade of a beautiful maple grove that stood on the west. About 1902 a new street was put through opposite Walker Street, extending west to Canandaigua Street and named Charlotte Avenue in honor of its owner, Mrs. Charlotte Jenner Birdsall, it being a part of her grandfather's farm.




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We leave Charlotte Avenue, one of the newest streets of the village and the sketch of its creation and occupancy until later.

Crossing the corner of Charlotte Avenue and passing to the north, we find on the west side the home of the late Hon. Frederick Winter Griffith. The lot upon which this house stands was purchased in September, 1887, by Edwin C. Hall. In October Mr. Hall began the erection of the house with the Harmon Brothers as contractors, doing the work. The house was completed about the first of May, 1888. Mr. Griffith purchased the property in 1891, taking possession in October of that year. The house was enlarged and remodeled and every convenience that could be added to one's comfort has been installed and the well-kept lawn made more attractive by the presence of two or more of the famous Hathaway grove maples, all of which adds much to the attractiveness of the home.

The Griffith homestead is now occupied by the elder son, Frederick A. Griffith, while the younger son Henry W., lives in a fine new home on Canandaigua Street.

Adjoining on the north and close by stands the home of Dr. William H. Marks. This pleasant little house was built in 1896 by the late Samuel P. Nichols and by him sold to the present owner. George C. Williams was the builder. For more than twenty years this attractive home has been well cared for and is one of the most pleasant homes in our village. The doctor is a native of Canandaigua, coming to Palmyra when a young man. He opened a dental office in the Jarvis block where he still continues to do a flourishing business.

The next house was built and occupied for several years by Lawrence S. Travers. About the year 1894, previous to his occupancy of this place, he built the house now occupied by Ralph J. Hinkle on Charlotte Avenue. He later sold to James B. Kent and purchased the lot and constructed the house now occupied by the druggist, David W. Briggs, who came from Warsaw and bought the Rushmore drug store on Main Street.

As we pass on we come to the Selner E. Braman property. Mr. Braman has always lived in Palmyra. When a young man he chose the insurance business for his life work. After being in the office with William H. H. Osborn for a time, he started out and opened an office of his own and a short time after purchased the lot and built the house where he now lives. Mr. Braman has taken the same pride in the neatness of his home and grounds as his neighbors.

On the next lot at the north, in the year 1856, the late Lewis Goodell, who kept a meat market on the corner of Main and Cuyler Streets, in an old wooden building, built an ice house on this same lot near the street. At that time there were no houses in this block on the west side of the road. Mr. Goodell employed a few men to dig out the bank for the building. Among them was an old colored man by the name of Congo Grason, who at that time was supposed to be over ninety years old. This old colored man who was noted for his wit and honesty was once a slave. He had lived in and around Palmyra for a good many years. About this time he was living with his fourth wife and had twenty-one children. Upon being asked one time as to the number of his children, he said he did not know 'zactly, but




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thought he had between twenty-one and twenty-two, suh. At one time he took a job of sawing wood, but shortly became sick of his bargain. He sublet the contract for one shilling less, thereby losing money in the transaction. He was asked why he was willing to lose money on the job. "Well," he said, "it was worth something to be boss."

There are but few today that remember the old "Congo," as he was called. His color was genuine, his laughter bore the same characteristics of others of his race. He did not know his own age, but from certain information and dates secured from him, he was perhaps 110 years at the time of his death.

At the time the ice house was put up, George W. Cuyler found a good deal of fault and justly, too, for the building was made of old boards and the structure was certainly no ornament to the street or surroundings. Isaac W. Brooks and George Olivett were the carpenters. Although the latter was a good carpenter and of a jovial mind, still it was not the aim of the builders to display any of the better qualities of workmanship on a building of this kind.

During the erection of the ice house it became necessary one cold autumn day to shorten a board which he desired to use in a certain place. This board had been standing up against the pile of lumber, but the time at last came when this board was to take its place in the building. Mr. Olivett, upon setting the board up against the building found it was too long and would have to be sawed off.

The writer of this sketch, who at that time was a boy and living with Mr. Goodell, was sent up occasionally to assist in the erection of the ice house, and seeing that the board must be sawed off, threw a snowball with the intention of hitting the exact spot, but unfortunately it went rather wide, of the mark, but Mr. Olivett said about six inches from where that snowball hit, and on taking it down it was discovered that there was a knot just where it wanted to be sawed. "Well," says Mr. Olivett, "I know it is right for it is always right when you have to saw through a knot."

Mr. Olivett and his oldest son, William, were in the Civil War, both returning from the conflict.

A few years later, William, while working in a paper mill at Shortsville fell through an opening in the floor and was instantly killed, August 10, 1882.

Those individuals that worked upon the ice house have long since passed away and are nearly forgotten.

Long years have passed since the ice house was built. We look in vain for the old crooked rail fence that once bordered the street. We look in vain for the old ice house. It has long since been torn down and the old cellar filled up. But few individuals of our village know that such a building ever stood there.

But again we turn our eyes. In the rear of where once stood the old ice house and back upon the knoll, and in line with the other houses of the street, stands the home of Alfred C. Hopkins, built by the late George C.




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Williams, the contractor. Mr. Hopkins was its first occupant, moving in March, 1897.

Our next to the north is that of Joseph W. Leach, who came to Palmyra as a young man in the 80's and went into partnership with his brother-in-law, James P. Tuttle in the hardware business. Shortly after, he married Annie F. Winston, daughter of the late George Winston. He bought this lot and built the present house. About 1920 he sold to Albert Mitchell and went with his son and daughter to California to live. He died in 1923. His wife died several years before he left Palmyra.

We now come to the last house in the grove, yet it was the first of these to be built. About 1870 Charles B. Bowman, son of William H. Bowman, purchased the lot and in 1871 built the fine house now occupied by his son, William H. Bowman, whose mother, Mrs. Lucy Lakey Bowman passed away June 26, 1929. Mr. Bowman with his son kept a drug and grocery store on Main Street for a good many years. After the death of his father the son continued the business.

One is attracted to this home by the primeval elms and beautiful flowers that decorate the grounds.

We are now at the north end of "Hathaway's Grove." Here for many years was the entrance to the circus ground, when Dan Rice, P. T. Barnum and others drew large crowds that came to town on circus day to see Dan Rice and the elephants and to hear the lion roar and the band play. Old Dobbin was hitched to the buggy, a good quantity of new mown grass was put in the back end of the wagon for old Dobbin to eat throughout the day. In those days some people would not let their children go to a circus but they could go to the caravan that usually followed about two weeks later, thinking it more instructive to see the animals. The names of these circus proprietors are now history and the "circus grounds" as such are entirely forgotten.

With all these homes standing in a line back upon the knoll a liberal distance from the street, their dooryards decorated with plants, trees, shrubs and flowers, we yet fail to find trees that made up part of the grove, except those at the Griffith home and the two elms in the Bowman yard with their branches spreading across the street to the admiration of all who pass beneath them.

The former owners of this part of the village and those who laid out the street are known in the memory of but few. Changes are on every hand. Those who may have left Palmyra two generations ago upon their return would look in vain for the grove. The old landmarks have vanished. The axe and the winds have done their work. The few remaining sentinels of the former forest afford shelter and shade to him who thus appreciatingly breathes the prayer:
Woodman, spare that tree,
Touch not a single bough,
In youth it sheltered me,
And I'll protect it now.
But time has drawn its curtain. The Hathaway Grove is lost in the shadow and we carry away with us none but the fondest recollections of




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the past as we bid adieu to the south end of Cuyler Street and resume our journey north.

Crossing Jackson Street we fInd on the northwest corner the home of the late Samuel Sawyer. Until 1871 when Mr. Sawyer purchased this lot and built the house the lot had laid to the commons. Mr. Sawyer was a fine carpenter. He came to Palmyra in the 40's and learned his trade with Captain George Cook of the Huddle, near Walworth village. At one time he was canal superintendent and he was also president of the village. He died about 1906. He was the father of Justice S. Nelson Sawyer. This place is now occupied by R. D. Sessions whose wife is a granddaughter of the late Samuel Sawyer and a daughter of Justice S. Nelson Sawyer.

The double brick house on the north was built in 1849 by Jacob Crandall, who was a merchant tailor with a store in the west end of the Williams block on the south side of Main Street. In the 50's he sold out and went to Niles, Mich., where he died in 1879. Since the ownership passed to Edwin Anderson the property has been owned by his heirs until 1923 when it was purchased by Mrs. Louisa Smith who is still the owner.

The next house on the north side and close to the brook, although occupying this location not so many years, may be rightfully considered one of the old houses of our village. It once stood on the south side of Main Street. where the Jackman house is now. In the 40's it was owned and occupied by Mr. Tuttle, who was at one time in the tannery business. Later John C. Coates purchased the property. After living there several years he sold the house to a Mr. Parker who moved it to its present location. It was later owned by Frances C. Hooker who sold it to George McKnutt. Mr. Coates built a new house on the site of the old one.

Next adjoining on the north is an old brick house. Although not authentic, some claim that it was built by Judge Palmer. Later it was owned and occupied by the late Dr. A. W. Marsh, who lived here several years, dying in the year 1884, aged 80 years. His widow died about seven years later. The builders of those two old houses have long since passed away and no one living can tell who they were. Charles Lebrecht now owns the place.

North of the Lebrecht house stands one of later date and more modern in construction, built in the 60's by George C. Pettitt. After the death of Mr. Pettitt it passed into other hands. Now it is owned and occupied by Rev. A. L. Boynton. It was formerly owned by Hiram O. Young.

The Cullen Rogers house on the north, although modern in appearance, was when first built a little, low cottage. Here at one time in the 40's lived Leonard L. Seaman. He came to Palmyra from Poughkeepsie before 1835. He was a clothier by trade. At one time he ran the Yellow Mill and had a feed store in one of the old wooden buildings in the Jarvis block. Later here lived Edward Smith, the wool buyer, who also had an office in one of the old wooden buildings in the Jarvis block. The late Dr. Trowbridge, coming from the Sweezey house on Main Street, in the 80's, purchased the property, remodeled and enlarged this little cottage to its present dimensions. After the death of Mr. Trowbridge in March, 1886, it came into the possession of Cullen H. Rogers, who died about 1910. After his death his




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widow lived here a few years. About 1920 she sold the property to Dr. Clarence C. Nesbitt.

About 1850 the late Carlton Rogers, son of General Thomas Rogers, built the large residence on the north. At the time it was erected, with its spacious grounds, ornamented with rare plants, shrubs and flowers, together with those stately elms, it was considered one of the finest residences in western New York. While time may not have changed the structure to any great extent, yet its former occupants have long since passed away. The daughter and only child, left three sons, whose homes have been made in other localities. Mrs. Radcliff, the mother, at her death left the property 'to her sons, who about 1910 sold the property to Pliny T. Sexton, who at his death gave it to the King's Daughters for a library.

In the rear stands the little double house that was moved to its present location to make room for the Grange Hall. In this small house, once the late Dr. Eggleston lived. On Saturday afternoon it was his custom, very much to the regret of his son, Irving, who had to stay in, to make blue pills for the distribution among his patients.

In those days a good many of the village people kept a pig or two. The doctor was also inspired by this enterprise and accordingly purchased one. For some time all went well, but before long the pig sickened and died. He engaged Johnnie, Smith, the cartman, to take the dead animal and bury it. When Johnnie came for his pay, he charged the doctor fifty cents for his services. This amount the doctor thought exorbitant and would offer but twenty-five cents. This Johnnie indignantly refused to accept and informed the professional gentleman by saying "And you will get your pig back again." Sure enough, the next morning when the doctor went out into the yard he found the pig, according to prophecy, lying in plain sight.

Long years have passed since the local press advertised the "Palmyra Gardens," located in the rear of the Main Street buildings, with entrance to same either from Cuyler or Main Street. Here the public congregated on holiday occasions. On July 4, 1834, about three hundred ladies and gentlemen gathered here in the evening to I witness the display of fireworks, which closed the celebration locally of the national anniversary. It was on this occasion ninety-five years since, that a certain pedagogue --or rather more of ordinary pretensions 00 affecting to entertain certain conscientious scruples against patronizing the vulgar amusements as he seemingly termed them, stole through an adjoining back yard and by means of a woodpile and other facilities obtained a seat upon a high fence which enclosed the Gardens, in company of a parcel of boys, negroes and ragmuffins. Fancying himself unobserved, he was experiencing a bountiful share of that peculiar situation of acquiring something for nothing, when he was hit by a skillfully directed rocket which knocked him from his ill-gained eminence into a large open cask beneath. 'The scene drew from the company in the Garden, loud and long-continued exclamations of encore! encore! encore!





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We now find ourselves back to Main Street from whence we started to visit Cuyler Street.

Jackson Street -- at Corner of Cuyler

Once more we will return to Jackson Street and resume our journey west. On the southwest corner of Cuyler and Jackson Streets is the old Stephen Hyde homestead, where he lived in the 40's. Printed history does not appear to record the existence of any building upon the corner lot. The "Hyde House" facing Jackson Street is the former home of the family and may be credited with being the last house in the village to have the old-fashioned side seats on the front porch, a very usual feature of the early homes in this vicinity. Stephen Hyde died in the village, November 22, 1859, at the age of fifty-nine years, while his widow, aged eighty-three years, died in April, 1883. The age of these two residents as here given would make their year of birth 1800.

Mr. Hyde also owned the farm on Stafford Street now known as the McKuon farm. William H. Bowman owns the Hyde homestead in the village and having converted it into a two-family house, now rents it.

As we pass along to the west we again come to the same little brook that we crossed on Cuyler Street. Here, too, we find the little wooden bridge has met the same fate as the one on Cuyler Street and has been torn away. A stone culvert is occupying the place and the stream is hidden from view.

As we pass on west we come to where in the 40's, Hiram Wilcox built a brick house in which he lived. In the 50's it was a Methodist parsonage, occupied at one time by Rev. Brown. In October, 1866, Samuel M. McIntyre purchased the property for $3,200. Mr. McIntyre enlarged and remodeled I the house, improved the grounds and made it one of the finest homes in the village at that time.

Mr. McIntyre was a son of the late Dr. Alexander McIntyre. He was an able lawyer. When the Civil War broke out he enlisted in Company A, 111th Infantry and was a First Lieutenant. He was discharged in 1864 and again took up his professional work. He died about 1905. His wife, who was a daughter of the late Dr. Pomeroy of Newark, died several years before. It was Dr. McIntyre who stood by General John Swift when he was shot.

At the death of Mr. McIntyre the homestead passed to his two daughters and while in their possession two lots were sold off on the east. The double brick house was built by the Williamson brothers, Harry and William W., sons of the late W. W. Williamson, a veteran of the Civil War, while the house on the west was built by John W. Marder, about 1910; later sold to C. A. Sessions, the coal merchant, who still occupies this attractive home. In 1921 the two daughters, Mrs. May McIntyre Bush and Mrs. Edith McIntyre Bott, sold the homestead and this beautiful home was converted into a three-family apartment, and is now owned by Leigh Sessions of New York. On the north side of the street and on the west side of the brook, we can see another fine residence, built by the Hon. Barnett H. Davis in 1872,




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at a cost of $13,000, and it has been for over a half century one of the finest houses on the street.

Mr. Davis came to Palmyra in the 60's and started in the grocery business on the corner of Canal and Clinton Streets. In the 70's he sold out to a Mr. Robinson who carried on the same business. Mr. Davis moved to Main Street and entered into partnership with the late Julius Cleveland, occupying the store now occupied by Henry Runterman. He continued in the grocery business until about 1910, his partner having died. Mr. Davis became old and infirm, sold out his interest in the firm. and retired.

In politics Mr. Davis was a staunch Republican, having been chosen twice by the people for Member of Assembly. He was at one time a leader in the Republican party in Wayne County. His wife having died about 1910, he went to live with his only daughter in Montclair, N. J., where he soon died.

About 1914 Judge S. Nelson Sawyer purchased the property, made a good many repairs and improvements, thus making it one of the pleasantest homes in the village.

Just west of the Davis property, in 1886, Charles H. Chapman, leaving his farm, bought of Alfred Sansbury for $1,000, sixty-five feet which at that time was part of an orchard. The old barn that stood close to the street was moved to the northwest where it now stands, and Mr. Chapman built the present house and barn for $3,000. About 1900 he was badly hurt at the West Shore Railroad crossing from which he never fully recovered, dying a few years later. His first wife died a few years before. She was a relative and adopted daughter of the late John Shepard. His second wife was the widow of the late George Cornwell. At her death, the daughter, Mrs. Arden H. Hurlburt, sold the place to David B. Lamb and went to California to live.

Adjoining on the west, still another lot was sold in February, 1888, to Thomas L. Cook, the writer of this book, fifty-three feet front for $1,000, on which he erected the present house for $2,500, and is still living here now, at the age of ninety-two years.

We now come to the old Truman Hemingway homestead from which the two lots previously mentioned were taken. Mr. Hemingway came to Palmyra at an early date and for a good many years had a drug store on Main Street as mentioned before. At his death the property passed to his daughter, Mrs. Alfred W. Sansbury. In 1868 this property was sold to the Baptist Society for a parsonage. The purchase price was $6,000, and Mr. Sansbury moved to Vienna Street. But this was of but short duration, for Mrs. Sansbury was homesick and longed for the home of her childhood. The next year the Baptist Society began to talk about building a new church and to economize, thought a cheaper parsonage would answer every purpose. Accordingly the property was offered for sale. The old home was bought back. Extensive were the repairs and many were the changes made, making the old home more modern and it was the Sansbury home for a good many years. Mrs. Sansbury died in the 80's and the pleasant old home was broken up. Mr. Sansbury was now an old man and went to




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live with relatives at Oaks Corners, where he died about 1905. The old home was sold to Edwin B. Anderson, who lived here a good many years. At his death, which occurred in 1923, the place was sold to Dr. R. A. Reeves in the Fall of 1923.

There were two of the Sansbury children, a son, Albert, who lives in New York and the daughter, Mrs. Mary E. Sansbury Mills, lives in Poughkeepsie, N. Y. When the homestead was sold, Mrs. Mills reserved the mantle over the fireplace in the front room, which was a piece of art, it being hand-carved by the late William Kellogg, a very skilled mechanic and a father of the Kelloggs previously mentioned.

The lot upon which the little cottage at the north stands, came from the Sansbury property. In the 80's James Bourne purchased the lot and built the house, Charles Nelson being the builder. Later it was sold to Pliny T. Smith, son of R. M. Smith. He learned to be a dentist and later sold out to Nelson Bement and moved to Rochester. Mr. Bement is a cigar maker and has a little shop in the rear of his house.

we Will now pass the Union School grounds, of which mention Will be made later. Our first house is where in the 40's lived one of the McKachnies; later owned and occupied by Butler Newton and in the 50's by Lewis Goodell; later by the family of the late Dr. William May. In the 90's William Ryckman owned it.

Adjoining on the north in the 50's lived the late Dr. Crandall. In the 80's it was sold to Lucius Foster, Who made the one-and-a-half story house to one of two stories and with other improvements made a fine home in which he lived until his death which occurred in 1914, his wife having died several years before. After Mr. Foster's death the homestead came into the possession of his three daughters, as has been prevoiusly mentioned. In 1923 the homestead was sold to make way for the present new school house as well as the house on the south.

Now let us cross the street and return south. We now come to the property of the Baptist Church Society and occupied as a church for many years. Here was a business office in the early days of Palmyra. Here was printed the early issues of the first newspaper published in Palmyra. Here was kept 'the early stores of the village. Here, too, was later to be found one of the homes of our community. More will be said about the history of the church later. In earlier days a little red house stood south of this property and for a good many years was occupied by John Shably, the harness maker. He died in July, 1887, only a short time after the death of, his wife, who was stricken while attending a social at the Methodist Church of which she was a faithful member, dying soon after being stricken, leaving two children, Mary and Charles.

In the 60's a Baptist minister by the name of Mudge, who was a carpenter as well as a minister, bought this little red house, tore it down and erected the present house, which has since been occupied by different ones. Among them were Mrs. Jordan, M. Story and Col. A. P. Seeley. At his death, which occurred in 1920, the property was bought by Fred F. Kelly, who died in 1927. His widow now lives there.




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In our next house on the south in the 40's lived Mr. Scantlin, followed by Mr. Parsons, a bookkeeper at the canal collector's office in the 50's. Later Mr. Parliman, the carpenter lived here and now Mrs. Marie H. Dryer occupies the place.

The house on the south is another built by Rev. Mudge, in the same year as the Kelly house. The Moors lived here several years. In the 80's they sold out and went to California. The late Edwin Brigham at one time owned the place. Later came Mrs. Milliman, followed by Charles O'Connor and now it is owned and occupied by Theodore Whitlock.

Where the Presbyterian parsonage now stands, in the 50's the Burbanks lived. Later the Presbyterian Society bought the property and for several years it served as a parsonage. About 1908 the old house was sold to Duane Smith and moved south of the brook on Canandaigua Street, and a new parsonage was erected on the san1e site. Adjoining this on the south is the old Barnett Johnson house, moved from the site of the Harkness house just east of the Presbyterian Church. In the 80's this place was purchased by the late Thomas L. Root, the hardware merchant. At his death it passed to his children, a son and daughter, who moved to Rochester. Now it is owned by Harry Elder.

The house on the south, in the 40's was owned and occupied by Mr. Pardee, a merchant on the north side of Main Street and was the first man in the town to raise cultivated strawberries. It was for several years the home of the late Stephen P. Seymour. Later it was owned by Enos W. Pomeroy, who about 1902 sold out and went to Michigan where he died. A short time after, the property was sold to Dr. Lacy Bebee Darling, who remodeled and enlarged the house. After living here a few years he died and the place was sold to Elmer L. McBride who again remodeled the house and now owns the place.

The late Schuyler Parshall, about 1849, built the house on the south. In the early 50's the late Hon. Martin Butterfield, of the firm of Butterfield and Walker, purchased the property. He was at one time a member of Congress and also owned the Mitchell farm on the Creek Road, where the rope walk stood. Mr. Butterfield died in the 60's. The house has been enlarged and made into a double house. Now it is owned by Harriet Cornelius of Rochester.

Until about 1920, the little white cottage on the south kept its old-time appearance for seventy years. At that date the late Allen Williams, the tailor, owned and occupied this little cottage. After his death the late Isaac Bronson purchased the property, in the 70's. Mr. Bronson, at one time, was employed in the First National Bank of Palmyra. Later he was in company with George W. Cuyler in the lumber trade, where the Crandall Packing Company is located. After Mr. Bronson's death it passed into the hands of the late William Macauley, whose heirs still occupy the place. The next house on the south was built by Guile &.Jones, who sold it to Walter Brown and later he sold to Miss Mildred Smith and he moved to Buffalo.

In the 40's,on the south, stood a small white house, owned and




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occupied by Franklin Williams, the jeweler. In the 70's Mr. Williams moved away the little white house to erect a more attractive, larger and more modern house on the same site of the old one, and at that time it was considered one of the finest houses in the village. Mr. Williams was a great lover of flowers and took great pains to keep his home attractive. He kept an up-to-date jewelry store on Main Street. He died in the 80's and the property went into the hands of Pliny T. Sexton. It is now owned by Mr. Ziegler.

In the 40's, on the south, once lived Leonard L. Seaman, who once ran the Yellow Mill, as before mentioned. In 1849 the late Dr. Horace Eaton, a native of New Hampshire, purchased this property and lived here until his death. His wife died about 1906 and a daughter, Elizabeth, occupied the place until her death on November 1, 1925. In the 70's Mr. Eaton enlarged the house and also made many improvements.

Mr. and Mrs. Eaton were typical New England people and as long as they lived still retained that same hospitality that is so characteristic of those people. At this homestead the latch string was always out to the rich and poor alike.
On one occasion when the doctor was ill, two or three of the individuals, who were unfortunately addicted to strong drink, but whose affection for the doctor was unbounded, hearing of his illness, after a little consultation, unanimously agreed to go in a body and call upon him and express to him their genuine sympathy. Thus showing that these old bums, as they were called, had kind hearts.

Canandaigua Street -- at Jackson Steeer

On the northwest corner of Jackson and Canandaigua Streets, we find the brick house, built some time in the 40's, by John N. Green. His widow, Mrs. Maria Green, mother of Mrs. Joshua Drake, died in this village on March 8, 1875. Nelson Drake once owned and occupied this place and after his death, which occurred in June, 1866, the property came into the possession of John J. Shepard, who had previously rented the place. Here he lived until May, 1875, when he passed away, leaving a widow, who maintained the home until her death, when the place was sold to Edwin W. Mason, who with his family and parents occupied the place until 1922, when Mr. Mason sold the property to David Levis, a produce buyer, who immediately began to make very extensive repairs, changing it both on the outside and inside and making it an up-to-date home.

Between Jackson and Main Streets, we find on the west side of Canandaigua Street twelve homes and the church on the corner of Main and Canandaigua Streets.

Mr. Shepard's mother, Mrs. Sarah Shepard, who lived with her son, was a French Huguenot, born in August, 1769. She moved from Duchess County to Wayne County in 1834. She died in February, 1873, aged one hundred three and one-half years. At one time this particular part of the village was noted for the number of aged persons residing there, Mrs. Shepard, Mrs. Salmon Hathaway and Col. James Stoddard and others.

We have now returned to Jackson Street on which we will continue our journey for a while. On the southwest corner of Canandaigua and Jackson Streets is the William H. Farnham homestead. Mr. Farnham




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came here in the early 50's, buying the place of James Gallup. Previous to this, David Aldrich lived here at one time and it is claimed by some that he built the house.

Mr. Farnham, in the 70's, remodeled the house in every way, besides making it larger. The work was done by George C. Williams, the contractor.

Mrs. Farnham was a great lover of flowers and always had a fine flower garden. Now with the modern house and beautiful grounds this is an enviable home. At the death of Mr. and Mrs. Farnham, the property came into the hands of their only son, Lewis H. Farnham, who died about 1917. In 1921 the place was sold to Sanford M. Young for $5,000 and the widow of Lewis Farnham moved West. Mr. Young enlarged and remodeled the house, which again became a modern home.

During the occupancy of Lewis Farnham, two lots were sold on the west side. Elmer Bird, the hardware man, bought the east lot, while Marvin Tyler bought the west lot. About 1916 the latter erected a very attractive cottage in which he lived a short time when he sold the same to William Huxley, who is still living there. In 1923 Mr. Bird also built a modern new cottage on his lot in which he now lives, enjoying all the comforts of his new home.

Adjoining on the west, in the 40's, on this lot stood a small barn that belonged to Freeman Thompson. This little barn was converted into a neat one-story white house which in the 50's William Moore owned and occupied. Mr. Moore was born in Albany County about 1822. He came to Palmyra when a young man and later engaged in the produce business. In the 70's Mr. Moore made very extensive improvements on the house, which was raised and enlarged and made into an up-to-date home. After the death of his wife he gave up his home and lived at one of the local hotels until his death, which occurred in December, 1902. The place waR now rented to different ones, and finally sold to Messrs. Cleveland and Tinklepaugh and later to Frank Ballou. Now it is owned and occupied by Benjamin Tyler, a native of Virginia.

Adjoining on the west is another old land-mark that has been more fortunate than some of its neighbors erected about the same time, by being remodeled and kept up with the times. The house was erected in the 40's by the late Charles Thurber, who at that time was in the lumber business with William H. Southwick, as before mentioned, and later in the produce business.

Mr. Thurber came to Palmyra when a young man. He was born near Troy, N. Y., in August, 1813. He married Catherine Burton. Mr. Thurber died in the 80's and a few years later, Charles Brigham, a hardware merchant, purchased the property and after living here several years, he died and the place was sold to Elmer E. Bird of the firm of Bird & Flynn. When Mr. Bird went into his new cottage in 1923, he sold the property to the Foster sisters, daughters of Lucius Foster, the shoe merchant, who had previously sold their home on Canandaigua Street to make way for the new school house. They are now living in the place.




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The brick house on the west was built in 1849 by William Crandall. With its fancy trimmings between the windows and its general outside appearance, it is very much the same as when first built. After living here a short time he sold out and went to lVIichigan. In the 60's Charles W. Bennett, for a good many years very prominent in the business life of this community, as a produce merchant, becalne the owner. Mrs. Bennett died at the home in 1897. The husband then made his home in California, dying in 1901. George W. Bennett, a son, for several years in the same business as his father, sold the property to Miss Emma J. Corson, daughter of Rev. C. W. Corson, who died a good many years ago. Miss Corson lived here a good many years with her sisters. She was employed for over thirty-five years in the office of The Garlock Packing Company, holding a very responsible position until 1922, when she was retired by the company, allowing her a merited pension the remainder of her life. On moving away the property was sold to Bernard Possee.

Our next place was built in the 50's by James Hersey, who was a carpenter of unusual ability. He lived here until 1866, when he sold the place to Isaac Gifford for $2,100. He lived here until his death which occurred about 1916, being over ninety years old at the time of his death. He left an only daughter, Miss Alice Gifford, who at the death of her father came into possession of the property. The house she extensively improved and in 1921 sold out to J. Francis Lines, an able lawyer, and moved to Florida, where she now lives. After Mr. Hersey sold out, he bought a place on East Main Street. A few years later he sold out and moved away and died in 1900.

Adjoining on the west was once the home of Anson B. Clemons, father of the late Col. Fred W. Clemons. He died about 1880. After his death the place was sold to the late John McKeown, a retired farmer. After he purchased the place he made a great many improvements on the house. He died about 1880. After his death an only daughter, Mrs. Mary McKeown Perkins, came into possession of the large estate. Again the house was remodeled. Mr. Justin Perkins and wife spend considerable of their time in Springfield, Mass., where Mr. Perkins has a large amount of property.

Our next house on the west and made of brick, was built in the 40's by William L. Tucker, who lived here a good many years. At one time he was postmaster. After he sold out he built a house on Main Street as referred to before. This place has been owned by different ones. Among the different owners were the late George Everette, a native of Macedon and a retired farmer; later by F. L. Jackman, who ran a laundry in one part of the house; still later by Dr. A. Y. Earl, a veterinarian, who remodeled the house and still occupies the place.

As we pass on we find the next house exactly in front of Washington Street. The lot on which this house was built was bought by the. late William Graham, a veteran of the Civil War. The purchase price for the lot was $700. The house was built in 1871. He died several years ago and his wife a few years before at the home of her brother in Detroit, Mich.




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The property passed into the hands of a niece in 1920 and was later sold to Edgar Fox.

As we pass on we look in vain for the little old Silas Shirtliff house. Mr. Shirtliff's father was one of the earliest settlers and lived on West Main Street as mentioned before. He died a good many years ago. Two houses were built by the late Amos Sanford, who became owner of the property. These houses are about the size of the former house. At the death of Mr. Sanford they came into the hands of Pliny T. Sexton. Now they are owned by others.

We pass on only to inspect and to recognize two more old landmarks that once stood on the corner of Main and Washington Streets and was once the home of the late Dr. David Hoyt. The house on the east has had a good many owners since it came to this street. Now it is owned and occupied by Mary Cook, while the other part of the house, for a good many years, has been owned and occupied by Ferris Palmer, a painter and decorator by trade, as was his father and grandfather, Samuel Palmer, each following the same vocation.

The next and more modern house was built in the 70's by William Sanford. His widow still owns the property.

Our next, as well as the one to the east and west were all built in the 70's. Thomas Possee, a veteran of the Civil War, built the house. After living here a few years he sold out and built a house on Gates Street. He died in the 90's.

The Jackson Street house is owned and occupied by Edward Alderman, who for a good many years was a mail carrier. He was retired November 24, 1928.

The third house in this group that was built in the 70's was by Thomas Glossender, who after living here a few years, sold out and moved to Michigan. Charles and his brother, E. T. H. Allyn, bought the property. Mr. Glossender died a few years after going to Michigan. He was also aveteran of the Civil War. The Allyn brothers later sold the place to the Holland Church Society. Here their several pastors lived until 1913, when they sold the property and built a new parsonage on Canandaigua Street. Charles Wallace now owns and occupies the place.

The little low house just east of the Fair Ground, in the 80's was owned by Mrs. Breman and later owned by Fred Shoal. During his occupancy he bought the little office that stood on Walker Street and was at one time the law office of Judge Strong, as mentioned before, and moved it to where it now stands, in which his mother lived. A few years later Mr. Shoal sold to Andrew Mertz, who died about 1922. His widow is still living on the place and his son occupies the little house to the back.

Mr. Shoal, after selling out, went to Rochester to live. In the 70's Mr. Ramish came from Macedon and built the little house west of the entrance to the Fair Ground. He served in the Civil War and in 1880 received a pension from the government with a back pension of about $1,400. A short time previous to his good fortune, he had a limb removed, probably as a result of injuries received in the army. About the time he




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received this pension money he purchased this house and lot. Michael Yackel later lived here and following his death the widow made her home elsewhere. Frank Noble purchased the place and now it is owned and occupied by John Deys.

John M. Jones of Clyde, came to Palmyra in 1855. At the west in 1856 he bought of John Hurlbut, a tract of land lying on both sides of the road, extending north to the Tiffany south line (now Edward Hurlbut) and to the south as far as the brook, for which he paid $600. On the south side of the road, in that same year he built the present large, two-story house, made of gravel and cement. The gravel was drawn on a one-horse wagon from where the Allen foundry on Williams Street was. For a time Mr. Jones raised vegetables and garden truck on the land, but his inventive genius soon caused him to enter the field of manufacture.

About 1850, when in Clyde, Mr. Jones read in the Scientific American, an article in which it was suggested that it would be a fine thing if some machine could be made that would permit one to write letters with type. The idea kept simmering in his mind and finally resulted in his patenting, in the year 1851, what he called "The Typographer." In 1853 Mr. Jones manufactured quite a number of them. One of these was taken to an exhibition in New York City, held in the building called the Crystal Palace, which stood on the site of the new Tilden Library. That machine being in a glass case, was always kept in a case and is now in possession of a grandson. The only other known in existence is in the patent office at Washington, D. C. Quite a number of them were made and sold at $30.00. They were not as rapid in operating as present day machines, but for its day and being the first one ever manufactured, showed great ingenuity He made one large machine using type three or four times regular size, but made only one.

For a time he had a little room in what was then Jenner's Cabinet Works, now part of the Garlock Packing Company's plant. Afterward he had a shop just back of their building and had a shaft running from the furniture works to give him power.

The first expansion that was done by J. M. Jones was in moving his factory to what is now known as the Bulmer lumber yard building; it was then known as the Old Stove Furnace; now it is Rowley's Lumber Yard.

Soon after coming to Palmyra he issued a patent on a cotton planter. This machine would easily do the work of thirty negroes and would have been a great thing if it had not been for the Civil War coming on at that time. He sold this to a Palmyra man by the name of Newton Foster, who was running the shop where the electric light plant was, just over the canal bridge and opposite the gas house. He got for this patent $9,000 from Foster, who made a lot of them, which were in the city of Atlanta when it was taken by the Federals and the warehouses in which they were stored were burned.

From that time on, Jones devoted his attention to printing appliances,




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one of the first being a very small, hand self-inking press, holding a form 2x1 1/2 inches, to be used by business men for printing their own cards.

From that tinle his operations extended to larger things. About 1860 he built a small shop and foundry on his lot near the Fair Grounds. He made, before the War of the Rebellion, one or two cylinder presses, but at the beginning of the Rebellion, there was no business, so he went to Nashville, Tenn., and worked in a government car shop for $3.75 a day, (which was big wages) and cooked rations. At the close of the war, he came home and immediately commenced experimenting on job printing machinery which finally resulted in producing the Globe press. Today this is a back number, but at that time it was a wonderful advance in the line of printing machinery. It was the first job press that used an impression throw-off and by touching a lever the rollers could be kept on the cylinder for better distribution of ink. It was a very powerful machine. They may be found even now in some offices where quality and great strength are desired.

In 1872 he sold out his interest for $10,000 and established the Jones Printing Press Works and made the Jones Gordon presses in a three-story building across the way, that he erected immediately after selling. In 1898 he sold his interest in the business to his son, Charles H. Jones, Moses W. DonaHyof Charleston, W. Va., and Will E. Forsyth. The firm name at one time was J. M. Jones & Co. Mr. Jones died in 1904, aged about eighty-eight years.

Cleveland interests took over some of the local holdings in the press works. Messrs. Marder and Bush bought in. Later John W. Marder became owner of the old Globe plant and employed a good many men. During the World War Mr. Marder made gun sights for the government. After the war he closed the factory, ran for a time and finally closed and Mr. Marder moved to Rochester.

After the Cleveland interest had carried on the business across the way for some time, the plant was moved to Cleveland. The old factory was torn down. The rubbish was cleared away and the ground leveled off and the lot sold to Glen Parker.

Thus the changes come. At one time at this end of the village, a good many men were employed, assisting in making printing presses that went all over the United States and to foreign lands, and on Saturday night the payroll for these skilled workmen amounted to hundreds of dollars. Now all is still. The old worklnen have passed away and the name of John M. Jones Printing Press Company has passed into history.

Adam Cook now owns and occupies the Jones homestead. Adjoining on the east, Mr. Jones sold to his son Horatio J. Jones in the 70's, a lot on which he erected the Gothic house. He later made his home in the West and the place was sold to the widow of C. C. Bates. Mr. Bates was for several years manager of the McKachnie Brewery here in Palmyra. He came here from Canandaigua and died in March, 1871. Mrs. Bates died in 1898 in Olympia and her remains were brought here for burial.




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Charles H. Jones later made his home in this place, later moving to Rochester. Now George Griffin owns and occupies the place.

In about 1925 the orginal foundry on the south side of the road was torn down. The ground was leveled off and two new houses were built on the site. One is occupied by the Misses Ella May and Lena W. Jeffery and the other by LeRoy Young. No trace is now left of the old foundry. Our next place to the west is the Palmer place of which we will say more later on in our journey.

The two little houses west of the Palmer place were built on lots bought by Jones & Guile at the time of the sale of Claremont Park. We have now come to the corner of Jackson and Stafford Streets. On the northwest corner stands the little house built about 1856 by the late John Goodrich, who came to Palmyra about that time, and win be remembered by some of the older inhabitants, who for a good many years kept a fish market on the corner east of the hotel; later in Pratt's meat market, where the trolley station now is. Mr. Goodrich died in 1895 at his Jackson Street home.

Some of the older inhabitants may remember a turkey shoot which Mr. Goodrich staged on the flats north of the village. It occurred December 31,1857, and the days following New Years Day. Refreshments were served on the grounds.

Soon after Mr. Goodrich's death, Miss Mary Palmer purchased the property. Later it was owned by her brother, Alvin Palmer, who sold out and went to California. It is now' owned by Henry Deys.

Next to the! Goodrich home on the east, in the 50's, was the Rumsey place. Oak Sylvester and John Moore also owned it. Now it is the Peter Barr estate. Mr. Barr was a soldier in the Civil War and his record as a soldier was an unusual one. Bravest of the brave, he served as color bearer. After three of his company had either been killed or wounded, while carrying the colors, just ahead of him, without any delay or hesitation on his part, he snatched the staff from his dying comrade and marched on bearing the colors.

Mr. Barr, who had formerly lived on a little farm south of the village, gave up his home there by reason of infirmities of age and moved onto Vienna Street. He died at his home. His aged widow died in 1928.

Next east of the John Moore property, was the home of William Moore. At his death his daughter, Mary Moore Randall, came into possession of the property that had been in the family over seventy years. Now it is owned and occupied by John Schrader, the blacksmith.

The two-story house adjoining on the east, in the 60's was owned by Andrew Sherman; later by Charles W. Bennett. In the 70's the late George Goodrich bought the property of Mr. Bennett and remodeled the house, making a fine home. After a short time he sold out and moved away. Since then it has had many owners.

The little white house on the east was built a good many years ago by John Hurlbut, who was one of Palmyra's early settlers. Later it was owned by Nelson Bement, a cigar manufacturer. His little shop stood in




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the rear of the house. About 1905 he sold to Leon Anthony and purchased of Pliny Smith the house just south of the school ground and built a new shop and is still occupying the place.

The house in the rear and back from the street was built by Mr. Remsen. Later it was owned by Mr. Olivett and was occupied for a long time by Mrs. Chase, a sister. Now it is owned by James DeBrine.

Crossing the Tice lot that runs north to Main Street, we come to the old foundry lot, owned by Glen Parker. The two little houses on the east were built by Mr. Marder about 1914.

The large double house was once one of the Jones buildings and at one time used byC. H. Jones in connection with his cat factory. When Mr. Jones went out of business, Dr. W. J. Hennessey purchased the property and made it into a convenient double house, once owned by Herbert Philips.

Adjoining this on the east is the house built in 1877 by Henry Pullman. Here, too, lived Richard Moore, at one time called "English Dick." Now it is owned and occupied by Mrs. Fred Spanganberg.

Our next house on the east was the home of Mrs. Jane Harse, widow of William Harse, a war veteran, who entered the Civil War in 1862 and died at Richmond, Va., in 1864. The widow made her home here for many years, until her death, which occurred several years ago. A daughter, Miss Mary Harse, also occupied the home.

The next two houses on the east were built in the 70's by the late Fred W. Clemons, and were owned by different ones. The one on the west in 1918 was owned by James Wells, followed by Charles Collins. The one on the east is owned by Glen H. Parker.

Gates Street

This brings us to Gates Street and to the Gregory home on the east corner of the street. Mr. Gregory lived at the corner of Gates and Jackson Streets in the 50's. Benjamin T. Gregory will be remembered as the plasterer who assisted in building a good many of the homes of the village. His name was found on the walls of the Beckwith home on West Main Street in connection with the date October 16, 1835. Mr. Gregory died in Wellsville in 1884. This place was purchased by Robert Bareham in 1865. Mr. Bareham was the father of our townsman, Robert H. Bareham. The elder Bareham died at his home on Jackson Street nearly forty years since. The place is now owned and occupied by others.

The next, as we pass on, is the little white house owned and occupied by the late John Ricard in the 70's. This little house -was moved here from elsewhere. Here this cheerful old couple lived a good many years, taking life as it came, always looking on the bright side. In 1874 Mr. Ricard rented the place and with his wife went to Albion to live. These old people had lived happily in this small but neat white cottage for many years. We later find it the home of Marvin Dailey and in more recent years it came into possession of Thomas Ferguson, who has enlarged and remodeled the house.

We now come to other landmarks of a former time, the two little old houses on the east. The west house in the early 50's, was the home of




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Mr. Dennis, coming from his farm on Stafford Street, now owned and occupied by the George Hack heirs. The one on the east was once the home of the late Joseph W. Corning, when it stood where now is to be found the home of Mrs. Charles McLouth. Amos Sanford bought the building and moved it to its present location, retaining its outside appearance of long ago with the same porch with its plank columns as when first built in the 40's. After the: death of Mr. Sanford the property came into the hands of P. T. Sexton. Reuben Milliman lives in the first of these two houses and Adrian Elias in the second one.

David Martin, for over sixty years a resident of Palmyra and one of the early stage drivers, lived in the next house, which was brought here from Canal Street, opposite the Crandall factory. David was a brother of Abram Martin, previously referred to. Mr. Martin died in the 80's, and his widow died in 1906. Not long afterward, Charles E. Rice purchased the property, now owned and occupied by Harry Forshay. Daniel Evans built the house on the east after coming from his farm south of the Yellow Mills in 1875 and title to the same has changed hands several times since. George E. Cornwell, Frank E. Hooker and Edwin Huxley have been subsequent owners. The family of the late Rev. Corson lived there at one time. Charles F. Griswold, after selling his farm on Maple Avenue, moved into the village, buying this property. Following his death, which occurred on Thanksgiving Day, 1913, the widow, after living here for a while, sold the property to Perry Sampson wHo occupies the place.

Alvin B. Newton of Marion built the brick house on the east. He had come to Palmyra and with George J. Irish as a partner, had gone into the hardware business. The brick house was built in 1872. Eight years later it was reported that Mr. Newton had traded the house and lot for a farm in Wolcott, with A. C. Bliss, who at one time was in the real estate business in Palmyra. The late Henry R. Durfee later owned the property, finally selling the same to the present owner, Lorenzo D. Warner. It is today one of the substantial residences of the street.

The next house on the east is of brick construction, built by Mr. Emonds, who was a cooper by trade, with his shop near the street. This old building has long since been torn down and no evidence is left to indicate that any such business had ever been carried on here. When it came into the hands of Joseph W. Corning after the Civil War, it was enlarged. William H. Bush later bought the property and built another house to the east on the Corning lot, which is now owned and occupied by Mrs. William Dixon. Title to the Corning house passed from Mr. Bush to David B. Lamb, who living at his home on the same street, and after renting the property to different ones, sold the same. Now it is owned by Mrs. Elizabeth Kelly.

In the 70's John K. Williamson and Thomas Hicks bought the lot on the corner of Jackson and Washington Streets. Mr. Williamson took the west half on which he erected the present house. After living here a while, he sold the place to his cousin, George D. Williamson and moved to the corner of Main and Liberty Streets. A short time after, George




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Williamson sold the place to 1Vlrs. Julia E. Yeomans, widow of Milo Yeomans, a native of Walworth.

Mr. Hicks, after living in his new house several years, sickened and died in the 80's. After the death of Mr. Hicks the house was converted into a double house and was occupied by tenants. About 1900 Mrs. Irene Hicks built the. house on the north which has had several owners. Now it is owned and occupied by Mrs. Carrie Couch. The corner house has changed hands a few times and is now owned by Mrs. Louise Smith, a real estate dealer.

The house on the opposite corner was for a good many years the home of the late Charles Throop. Mr. Throop died in January, 1890, and his widow continued to live here until her death in 1901. Title to the property later passed from the Throop family and was acquired by G. Albert Tuttle, who lives on the north, and has converted the Throop house into a double house.

Around 1906 the late Frank Hutchins purchased a lot off the east side and built the neat little cottage, John Marder being its first occupant, followed by the late Oliver Durfee, Frank C. Coates and now by Irving Hutchins, a son of Frank Hutchins.

We now come to the oldest house on the street, built very soon after the street was laid out, by William Shannon, a carriage trimmer by trade, who worked a good many years for Alanson Sherman; also for Calvin Seeley, trimming carriages.

Mr. Sherman claimed the distinction of trin1ming the first railroad passenger coach running between Albany and Schenectady, when wooden rails and band irons were used. After living here several years and becoming somewhat tired of his occupation and the wonders and glories of farm life had long flittered before his imagination, in the latter part of the Summer of 1857 he sold his house and lot and purchased a little ten-acre farm with a log house on it, of Theodore Rawson, one-half mile west of the Walworth station. Mr. Rawson had become old and went to Michigan to live with a daughter. But when the storm clouds of Autumn began to gather, the charm of farm life fast began to wane, and before the drifting snows of Winter had a chance to pile up in front of the log cabin door, he seized upon his first opportunity and sold out to the late Andrew Lisk and moved back to Palmyra, purchased a lot on Washington Street and built a house where he spent the rest of his life, dying in 1905, being over ninety years old.

In the 70's we find the late David Lyon the owner of the Jackson Street property. He remodeled the old house and made it a modern home. A few years later Charles Chapman purchased the property and moved in, and after living here a short time, sold to the late Alonzo W. Wynkoop, who lived here until his death, which occurred December 30, 1920, aged eighty-nine years. His widow died May 8, 1924, at the age of ninety-two. Now their daughter, Mrs. Joseph Sawyer, lives there.

Our next house on the east was built by George Bortles, son of Frank Bortles. He purchased the lot of Charles W. Bennett, formerly owned by




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Freeman Thompson and before the road was laid out, extended across the way. The frame was put up in October, 1872. Mr. Bortles operated the "Bee Hive Grocery" in the old Jarvis store. He sold out in June, 1874, to George Brown & Son and rented the house for a while after moving away, Edwin Cumings being one of the tenants.

The Baptist Church Society bought the property for a parsonage of Mr. Bortles in September, 1876, for $3,500. Here the several pastors of the church have made their home.

Adjoining on the east was the home of the late Marlin R. Smith, who was born in Palmyra. When a young man he learned the tinsmith trade. When the Civil War broke out he enlisted in the army and served until the war closed. After returning from the war he entered the employ of the First National Bank of Palmyra, retaining this position around sixty years and was its cashier for a good many years. In the 70's Mr. Smith purchased a vacant lot of Charles Hathaway and erected the present house which was his home the remainder of his life, dying in 1925.

In passing, a little incident might be mentioned in regard to his bravery, while yet a young man. One night a burglar entered his house. Mr. Smith happened to be awake and he'ard a noise. As he listened he thought all was not just right and started to investigate. He saw a man moving around in the room. Not waiting to know whether the man was armed or not, he made a dash for him, threw him down and held him until the family could arouse the neighbors and the burglar was soon lodged in jail. Mr. Smith was rewarded by seeing him placed in Auburn prison.

The brick house on the lot adjoining on the east was built by the late John N. Green, who owned the land east to the corner. This house was built in the 40's and in the 50's it was owned and occupied by the Armington family. Later A. G. Pierce occupied the place for a time and in 1877 Norman Lapham, leaving his farm, moved into town, purchased this property and remodeled and enlarged the house, drawing the brick from Newark. This was completed in 1878. At the death of Mr. and Mrs. Lapham the homestead was left to the two daughters, Emily E. and Helen S. Lapham. Mr. Lapham was a son of Aretus Lapham, coming from Providence, R. IO., in 1810, and settling on the Walker Road.

Adjoining on the east is the little house built by Mrs. Ella Hurlbut, widow of Theron Hurlbut. This lot came off the John N. Green lot and was purchased from the widow of John Shepard. Now it is owned and occupied by J. W. Thomas, a hardware merchant.

We now find ourselves back again to the corner of Canandaigua and Jackson Streets. In our journey we have followed along the period of "long ago," when Mr. Shannon built the first house on the street, until the present time.

When Mr. Shannon came here, neighbors were not real near ones. Jackson Street had just been taken from the pasture field. The shade trees and the side walks were yet to come. The streets were lighted only by the glimmering light of the moon, or the flickering light that came through the holes that had been punched through the old round tin lantern




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that held the candle dip. Then the lantern, like the boot jack, was kept in a handy and convenient place, which was equally as much a necessity. Not only have these material conveniences ceased to be of daily use, but many of the younger generation probably never saw a boot jack or one of the old-time lanterns. Although the houses erected by the earlier residents still grace our streets, the builders have long since, in many cases, passed away, and many names are but a memory.

Let us now take a stroll down Washington Street, beginning at the Main Street corner, passing from north to south and on the east side. In the 20's Joel McCullen owned Washington Street, and the lands on both sides, so that on April 27, 1829, when he petitioned the Trustees of the Village of Palmyra to layout a street to be "known and distinguished as a public highway and to be called Washington Street," he was the only one interested in the lands through which the street was laid. The street was three rods wide, its center being one and one-half rods west of Stephen Ackley's building lot. It was thirteen chains and eighty-five links in length and ran two degrees west of due south. It was laid out on April 29, 1829. Stephen Ackley's building lot must have been the present Averill corner lot.

McCullen also asked in his petition that Jackson Street be laid out four rods wide and to extend from the eastern line of James White's land, thirty-two rods to lands of William H. Cuyler. For a period of at least seven years the validity of the establishment of Washington Street seemed to be open to attack. Barriers were put across the street and finally in August, 1836, a new survey, similar to the one of 1829, was recorded, but some of the adjacent lands had changed ownership. Now James Hickey owned the corner lot instead of Stephen Ackley. Edward M. Klapp had purchased the lands of James White.

The order of the Board of 'Trustees was that all fences or other obstructions across the street must be removed within three days from notice given to remove the same.

In 1852 the lands on the eastern side of the street were owned by Fay H. Purdy, Samuel Palmer and George Newland, in the order from north to south. Considering the condition of the last half a century or a little more, we find after passing the Averill corner that their barn which stood just to the south of the house, has been removed. Our first house was built by Mrs. Elizabeth Chapman, widow of the late William Chapman. Later it was owned by George Farnham and now by Mrs. Christian Luppold.

The house at the south was, in the 70's, owned and occupied by one of the McKachnies, who was at that time connected with the old brewery on Canal Street.

About 1848, Fay Purdy, a Methodist exhorter, and a camp meeting promoter, moved from the Billings farm on the Walworth road to Palmyra and bought this property. After living here a short time, he moved to the brick house west of the Baptist Church, as mentioned before.

In the late 60's, Dr. Durfee C. Chase bought this property. He died




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at an advanced age in 1872. At his death his daughter, Mrs. Louisa Chase Lakey, widow of the late Franklin Lakey, came into possession of the property. At her death the property came into the possession of the late Col. George McGown, a son-in-law of Dr. Chase. Mrs. Arthur Dadmun now owns this place. Mr. McGown also owned the house south which was occupied by the Andrew Seeley family for twenty-five years. James Cahill now owns and occupies the place.

We now come to the Samuel Palmer house, who came here in the 40's. He was a painter by trade and had a shop on Williams Street and employed a good many men. He had one daughter and three sons who were in the Civil War. Mr. Palmer's parents came from Rhode Island in 1810 and settled in the town of Macedon, of which more will be said as we advance in our journey. Samuel Palmer died at his home on Washington Street in October, 1877. After the death of Mr. Palmer, the late Irving Johnson, coming from his farm south of the Yellow Mills, to Palmyra, purchased the Palmer property, built a new house in 1884 and after living here a short time, sold out to Charles B. Whitney. Later Mr. Whitney sold to F. G. Couch and moved to Rochester, and about 1921 Mr. Couch sold to Karl Engel, who now lives on the place, and moved to New York.

During Mr. Whitney's ownership, he sold a lot to· Mrs. Alma· Smith, widow of Rufus Smith, who built the little cottage on the south. After her death, about 1900, the property went to her daughter, Carrie Smith Couch. About 1921 she sold the place to her sister, Mrs. Mary Smith Bush, who is still living there.

As we advance in our journey we arrive at the George Newland property, which he bought in the 40's. This tract extended from the south line of the Palmer property to the north line of the Throop lot on Jackson Street. Mr. Newland built a barn on this lot in which he lived for a while. Mr. Newland made a medicine about the time that the cholera was sweeping through the country, which he advertised for summer complaint, that was very good and in great demand at that time, and now can be obtained at Bowman's Drug Store on Main Street. At the time Mr. Newland bought this property it was very low and on this land he drew hundreds of loads of dirt. This was all set out to grape vines. Later he built the house in front of the barn and is now the home of Miss Mary Chapman. After his death the land was divided into lots and sold off. The north house was built by Daniel Harmon and later sold to David Finley, a retired farmer and a native of Wahvorth. In the 80's Alembert G. Wigglesworth purchased the property and enlarged the house. In the 90's he sold out and went to Utah. P. T. Sexton now came into possession of the property.

About 1904 Collins Payne purchased the property, raised the house two feet, using the cement blocks that we can see. Mr. Payne is a retired farmer, coming from the town of Manchester.

In the 70's the late Samuel Sawyer purchased two lots on the south and erected two houses. The north house was owned and occupied for about twenty years by the late Herbert N. Harmon, who sold it to the late Austin R. Knapp. Now it is owned and occupied by his son Spencer




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L. Knapp. The south house for several years after being built, was occupied by Samuel Sawyer's son, Judge S. Nelson Sawyer, who later sold the place to Allison E. Huntley of Walworth and in a very short time it was sold to Mr. Downs of Walworth. Now it is owned and occupied by E. N. Parker.

In the 70's Warren Schofield bought the Newland homestead and the remaining lot and enlarged and modernized the house. After living here a few years he died very suddenly. The place was then sold to Rufus Smith, reserving a small lot on the south on which Mrs. Schofield erected the present little cottage, where she spent the rest of her life, and at her death her daughter, Mrs. Minnie Schofield Lent, came into possession of the property, where she now lives. After the death of Mr. Smith the place was sold to William A. Chapman, a retired farmer. When he and his wife had passed away, the place was left to a daughter, Miss Mary Chapman, who is still living there. The little cottage on the south is the Schofield place which we have just mentioned.

Our next house on the south was built by Carl Langworthy and is now owned and occupied by George A. Tuttle. Since Mr. Tuttle came into possession of the property, a good many improvements have been added. He came to Palmyra with his parents when a young man. His father was in the hardware business as mentioned before. After the father's death, the son continued in the business for several years.

Crossing to the west side of the street we now come to the once Dugan property. Two brothers, Thomas and Nathaniel Dugan, purchased the property in the 40's. The land extended from Jackson Street north to the north line of Austin Knapp's lot. On this lot two brick houses were built. Thomas lived in the north house while Nathaniel occupied the one on the south. After their death this property was divided into lots. That portion lying on Washington and Jackson Streets which had been so long open to the commons, was bought by Thomas Hicks and John K. Williamson, on which each erected a house as before mentioned. The little brick house was sold to Cicero Hutchins, at one time a Principal in the old Union School and in the 70's he sold out to Miss Cornelia Sa"vyer and bought a farm on Canandaigua Street. Miss Sawyer was a daughter of Henry Sawyer and died at this home about 1900. Later William Downs of Walworth bought the property but lived but a few years after moving here. Mrs. A. Little of Geneva now owns the place.

Mr. Dugan's daughter married the late Nelson Drake, a produce dealer, as before mentioned.

Our next house on the north was built by William Shannon, soon after moving from his log house in the country as mentioned before. Now it is owned and occupied by the heirs of Mrs. Josie Hammond.

Our next house north of the Hammond house was the house owned and occupied by Miss Alice Wayne, who came here a good many years ago with her widowed mother and at the death of the mother the place came to her daughter.

Our next house was erected in the late 40's by the late Osamus T.




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Bates, who was a carpenter. After his death, his son lived here for a while. Around 1900, the late William Bush purchased the place, made a good many improvements and later sold to William Briggs. After his death, which occurred about 1901, the place was sold to Ulysses Sherburne, who came from Walworth. After living here a short time, he sold to Mrs. Clara Billings Yeomans, widow of Han. Albert T. Yeomans of Walworth. This place is now owned by Benjamin Witherden.

This leaves the Bates house adjoining the brick Dugan house on the north. After the death of Mr. Dugan, William Tallou came from the town of Macedon and bought this property in the early 50's. Mr. Tallou, after coming in the village, entered into partnership with Philip Palmer, buying produce. Later he withdrew from the firm and sold out and moved away. For a time this house was used for a Methodist parsonage. Later Lyman Lyon, the banker, purchased the property and at his death his son-in-law, Austin R. Knapp came into possession of the property. The house was enlarged and made into a double house. Mrs. Rose Lyon Knapp, widow of Austin R. Knapp, lives here now. Mr. Lyon came to Palmyra from Lyons and went into the banking business. At his death the business was closed out.

Adjoining this property on the north is the old Oak Sylvester house in the 50's. This house was moved here from the corner of Liberty and Main Streets to make way for the large house standing on that same site. This old house was the home of John Rowling as mentioned before. Mr. Sylvester was a cooper by trade. In the 60's he bought of Mr. Wilcox the old Hemingway drug store which he kept until the old wooden building was moved to Williams Street, which was about 1876.

After the death of Mr. Sylvester the property changed owners and finally in about 1900 the late Frank Nash bought the property and sold a lot on the north to Edward Stell who built the present cottage. After living here awhile he sold the place to Mrs. Leonard Cramer who came from Macedon. For several years it has been owned and occupied by Frank Mosher, a native of Marion.

After the death of Mr. Nash the south place was sold to Karl Engel. About 1920, Daniel Miller, a retired farmer coming to Palmyra from Wolcott, purchased the property and now owns and occupies the place.

We now come to the home of Tommy Barks, the village gardener and a native of England, who lived here in the early 50's. After his death the late Edwin P. Johnson in the 80's bought the property and erected the present house on the same site after tearing dovvn the old one. Mr. Johnson was a veteran of the Civil War and in the 70's had a grocery store in one of the old wooden buildings on the corner of Main and Market Streets.

After his death the place went to his son William. In 1924 the place was sold to Mrs. Laura Randolph. Now it is owned by Jacob Cleason.

Passing north we come to where in the 40's lived Major Randall, who was a bridge builder. Since his death the property has changed hands several times. In the early 80's Hiram Jennings lived here. He moved from Manchester and died in 1889. His two daughters lived here several




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years and about 1923 it was sold to Albert Chapman, who made a modern home of the old house. Leon Anthony now owns it.

The brick house on the north was built in the 40's by the late Stillman Jackson, who was a gunsmith by trade and at one time in the early 40's had a shop in the old brick building on the corner of Main and Canandaigua Streets; later where Bowman's store now is and still later in his own dooryard. In 1845 Mr. Jackson went to California. Shortly after returning he was made superintendent of the Gas Works. He had twO sons, James and Charles -- the former went West while the latter went to sea. Mr. Jackson died a good many years ago. His widow survived him by several years. At her death the place was bought by the late Francis C. Brown. About 1900 the late William H. Bush purchased the property and enlarged and beautified the house. After living here for several years he died and the place went to his widow and daughter. In 1921 the place was sold to Ulysses W. Sherburne, a native of Walworth, who has a large garage on West Main Street. Mrs. Bush, after selling out, moved to a house that she had bought as before mentioned.

We now come to the end of our journey on Washington Street. We have followed along the line from the time it was opened up for a public highway to the present time, and in our passing we have noted the changes. We look in vain for its first settlers and ask who built this house or that. No one can tell. Its builders have long since passed away and only history can reveal to us their name.

Tidy homes and stately elms now dot the once open field, and with its dustless road and shady walks, thus making Washington Street an enviable place in which to live.

Now let us go back to Jackson Street and take a stroll down Gates Street, which takes its name from the late Daniel Gates, who laid out the street, and for the sake of convenience we will pass down the west side. The first lot was once owned by Burr Butler, who raised horse chestnut trees here and at one time Gates Street was all set out to horse chestnut trees and some of them can be seen standing today. The house now on the lot was for many years an old land mark on the south side of Vienna Street, just east of Howell Street, and occupied for a long time while here by the Porter family. A good many years ago it was moved to its present location and for a long time was occupied by the Segar family, Later Elmer Jones bought the property in the 80's and after living here several years sold out and went to Niagara Falls to live. The late William Parker, a native of Walworth and a veteran of the Civil War, came to Palmyra and purchased this property and lived here until his death which occurred in 1905. His widow lived here until 1922 when she sold out to William Plummer, and if it has as good care in the future as in the past it will afford shelter and comfort for a good many years to come, to those who occupy it.

Adjoining on the north lived the widow of another veteran of the Civil War, whose husband was Thomas Possee, who died about 1900. Mr. Possee built this house in which he died. It is now owned and occupied by Louis Humbert.





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The house on the north has been owned and occupied by several different ones. Among some of them are Charles Rice, Charles Joyce and now by Mrs. Glenna Mohlar Holtz.

Adjoining on the north in the 50's stood a little red house which was the home of the late William Possee, father of Thomas Possee as before mentioned. Mr. Possee came to this country from England about 1851, arriving in Palmyra late in the Fall and wintered in the canal boat in which they came. There was a large family, five boys and two girls. The boys were William, John, Thomas, Walter and George Possee. They were not here long before they purchased this little home. When the Civil War broke out, loyal to the country of his adoption, he enlisted as did his three eldest sons, William, John and Thomas. The other two sons being too young, remained at home with the mother. After the Civil War was over and upon being permitted to live, the men of the family returned to their home in Palmyra. Mr. Possee died in the 70's and his widow died a few years later. Only a grandson is living here today and their name is almost unknown to the present generation. But the names of the father and three sons are recorded in history and on each succeeding Decoration Day, out of respect and in gratitude for what they did for their country, their graves will be decorated with flowers and Stars and Stripes that they so nobly fought for will be left by some kind hand to wave over the grassy mounds as in days gone by.

The little old red house in which they lived has long since been torn away and one more modern has been erected on the site by John K. Williamson, who later acquired the property, but it has since passed to De. G. L. Watters. The George Trumbull house on the north is occupied by Frank Beal.

Adjoining on the north is still another old land mark and it was once the home of the late Major John Gilbert, a printer by trade, and he had the distinction of setting the type for the first Mormon Bible. He was a musician and taught dancing school in ye olden time. The property is now owned by LeRoy Nussbaumer.

Passing on, we come to the house built by E. S. Poyzer about 1910, and adjoining on the north we find another modern house built about the same time as its neighbor on the south by Marvin Tyler, the carpenter. Shortly after being completed, he sold the house to Darwin Guile, who came from the original Jackway farm south of the village. Mr. Guile died in 1925. His widow is still living on the place.

These two houses, including the one on the north, are all on the Gates lot. The north house is the old Daniel Gates house and the first frame house in the village built by Silas Hart in very early day. This house was moved here from Main Street to make room for the large house on the opposite corner, as mentioned before. At one time the late Louis Olivett owned the property and he changed the outward appearance of the house so much that nobody would know that this was the same old Gates house. The property is now owned and occupied by W. H. Fitzgerald.

We will now cross the street and view the little homes. As we journey




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south the first three houses were built by John Bulmer, who owned this land in connection with the corner lot. The owners are Alice Curran, Richard Derrick and Robert Poyzer.

Adjoining on the south is the Sellick place, now the Jeffery home. The little house on the south was also built by the Sellicks in the 70's. It is now owned by the widow of Clark Barron, a veteran of the Civil War.

We now come to the home of the late Morris Huxley, familiarly known in his day as "Old Dad." He was the first driver of the bus to the New York Central Railroad, as before mentioned. Mr. Huxley bought the lot and then moved the house from Main Street, being a part of the old Jenner house. Charles Nussbaumer now resides here.

Our next house was in the 50's the home of John Mumford, who was a native of England. It was for many years owned and occupied by the late Oscar Tiffany, who died about 1920. Mrs. Irene Tiffany Hollenbeck now lives here.

On the south, in the 80's, lived a Mr. Merritt. Later F. W. Gurnee, a veteran of the Civil War, purchased the property. Here he lived until his death, which occurred about 1918. The widow is still living on the place. She is the granddaughter of the late Stephen Durfee, one of the early pioneers.

The next place was the home of the late Albert Pierce in the 70's. Upon his death the place came into the possession of the late Carlton Foster, who died about 1917. His widow is still living on the place.

Adjoining on the south is the little place where Mrs. McKeown lived for several years. At her death John R. Hughes acquired the property.

The late William Derrick built the next house in the 70's. He died in the 80's. It was later owned by Clyde Gibson and is now owned by Katherine Morrisey. This brings us back to the corner of Gates and Jackson Streets.

North on Stafford Street
(from Jackson to Main)

Our next tour will be down the east side of Stafford Street. The first cottage (after leaving the corner) was built by John Goodrich. Now it is owned and occupied by Carl Milliman.

Passing along we recognize the double house as the one that stood on the corner of Gates and Main Streets, which was bought by the late George Nichols and moved to its present location in the 90's to make room for the large double house now on the site. At that time Mr. Nichols owned several vacant lots adjoining this. Later Fred Jeffery bought the house and four lots for $600. These lots ran to the north and on each one a fine cottage has been built, now owned and occupied by the following named persons from south to north: George Truax, Mrs. Jerry Briggs, Earl Noble and John H. Tucker.

The two little cottages on the north were built by Mr. Nichols and are now owned by Hugh L. O'Neil and Richard De Coster.

Adjoining on the north is the home of Roy Alles.

We now come to an old land mark that in early day stood further north on the corner until O. H. Palmer came into possession of it and moved it to its present site.




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In the 60's the late James Shirtliff bought the property. At his death it passed into other hands. Among some of them were Harry Bogardus and Mahaney and it is now owned by James Hurst. This house is one of the oldest in the village and was once the home of one Benjamin Cole. The house has been enlarged and bids fair to last a good many years more. Dr. McCarthy and family occupy the next house.

Across the way is a little cottage now owned by Louis Foster. On the south is another cottage built at about the same time by Mr. Bogardus, now owned by Ella Mahaney and occupied by Daniel Kennedy. On the south lives Clarence Hood and family in a house built in the 50's.

The large brick house on the south was built in the 50's by Robert and William Bareham. Robert Moore owned the property at one time; also Robert Hale. In the 70's the late Major Henry Hale of Halesborough, N. Y., wishing to locate in a fruit country, came to Palmyra, purchased this property, enlarged the house and planted fruit trees, thus making a fine home. At his death the property passed into other hands. Among the different owners who came into possession of this two-acre plat were Salem Amidon and Alvin LaRue, who built the fine double house on the south now owned by De Cracker and Blankenburg. The brick house is now owned by Frank Williams.

The house on the south was built by George Haywood and is now owned and occupied by Fred Eggert and family.

The next house on the south is owned and occupied by Mrs. Maude Pestle. This is followed by a small cottage, built, owned and occupied by Hugh Austin.

South on Stafford Street, from Jackson

We have now returned to the corner of Jackson and Stafford Streets. But, however, we will continue our journey on Stafford Street. Commencing at the west side of Jones' shop, all that tract of land that extended as far west as Stafford Street was at one time owned by the late John Hurlbut and in the 70's, Ambrose Lapham, a wealthy merchant and bachelor came to Palmyra and bought seventeen acres of land on the north end of the Hurlbut tract. On this farm he erected a fine large brick house and barn at a cost of $10,000. About the time the house was completed, his brother-in-law, George Smith, who was a cattle buyer and a Quaker, sold his farm on the Walker Road to the late C. C. B. Walker and came to live with Mr. Lapham and to care for and make a home for him. Mr. Lapham died a few years later. When Mr. Smith and wife had passed away, Truman Carman bought the place in 1884 for $8,000 in money, two houses in Rochester and one in Macedon Center. He lived there until his death which occurred on July 19, 1911, aged eighty years. At his death the property passed to his daughter, Mrs. Jeannette Carman Palmer, who lived at Chicago. Her husband, Byron C. Palmer, sold his property in Chicago and moved to Palmyra to occupy the homestead. He died January 25, 1927. The widow still owns and occupies the place.

In 1910, two or three Yankees from New Hampshire, came to Palmyra and purchased from Mr. Carman all the land now called Claremont Park, including the lot east of the corner where two cottages now stand, Mr.




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Carman reserving the house and nearly three acres of the land. On this land the Yankees laid out streets, measured off lots and numbered them and built sidewalks. When all this had been completed the lots were advertised to be sold at auction. This was done very elaborately. Vases and many other articles were to be distributed lavishly. The lots were sold so quickly that one had to run or lose a good chance. The thirty-six lots were sold in a little over an hour.

Thinking perhaps it might be interesting at some future time to know the names of the original owners who bought lots at this sale, I include the names of the purchasers and also the lot numbers, as follows: Jones & Guile, 1 and 2; Jones, Guile & Lebrecht, 3; IIarry Chapman, 11 and 12; Mary Bogardus, 5; Jones & Guile, 6; C. F. Griswold, 7, 8 and 26; Wright R. Phillips, 9; Bessie Barron, 10; Mary Ryan, 11 and 12; Milton Russell, 13; George A. Hicks, 14; Robert F. Poyzer, 15; Philip J. Hughes, 16; Lyman E. Briggs, 17 and 18; W. J. Dean, 19; Hannah S. Chase, 20; Dr. A. Y. Earl, 21 and 32; George G. Throop, 22; Frank C. Wallace, 23; John H. Rush, 24; Elon C. Stearns, 25; William Adams, 27; J. G. Simpkins, 28; William L. Knapp, 29; Howard Forshay, 30; Harry Forshay, 31; John E. Jeffery, 33; Oliver A. Whitney, 34; Raymond Chilson, 35; C. J. Mathews, 36.

Up to the present time but very few houses have been built on this tract except along Jackson and Stafford Streets. On Jackson Street the one next to the Palmer place is owned by persons residing away from Palmyra and the one on the corner of Jackson and Stafford Streets by Perry Hornsby. Turning the corner and going south on Stafford Street, on the east side we find several houses built on land belonging to the Claremont Park tract. The first house south of the Hornsby place on the corner is owned and occupied by Leo Cullen. The next place is owned by Arthur Gibbs, who is employed at Bird & Flynn's, and is occupied by others. John E. Mouten owns and occupies the next. This is followed by Earl Geer. Then come vacant lots bounded on the south by the Mrs. Alice Padgham property. Other vacant lots bring us to East Foster Street, but let us not forget that Elon Stearns, Rex Young and Howard Forshay now live in the new houses that have been built on lots on the cross streets in Claremont Park.

Now let us go back to Jackson Street and continue our journey on Stafford Street. The first house on the west was built in the early 70's by the late George Haywood, who bought seven acres on the east side of the road from the Truman Carman tract. This house and land later passed to Albert Wheeler. Now S. G. Barton owns it. Other fine cottages have been put up from time to time.

The first one past the Barton place is Willett C. Brethen's place; the next the Philip East home; next Arthur Poyzer; then Raymond Warner and Isaac De Gelleke.

East on Foster Street, from Stafford

Passing on south we come to West Foster Street, which was laid out in the late 70's and which runs east from Stafford Street. Three houses were built soon after the street was laid out. William Page built the first




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house on top of the hill on the north side. Lewis Chase came next, followed by Peter Ford. These three young men came here and built their homes in the same year. Other homes have been built since, making the present land owners on the north side of the street from west to east as follows: Paul Johnson, Mrs. Alice Frey, John VanHolder, Peter DeBrown, Raymond Clemons, Thomas O'Keefe, Mrs. Marie Van Lare, Mrs. Elizabeth Chase and Henry W. Griffith on the corner, whose home faces Canandaigua Street.

On the south side of Foster Street, beginning at Stafford Street: Fred Coomber built the first house on the side hill, now owned and occupied by Morris McGuire. The next house east was built by Alvah Palmer in the 70's or early 80's, I think. The Webster estate now owns this. The next on the east was built by Miss Mary McKnutt and is now owned by Wallace Miner. This brings us to the Rumrill place which faces Canandaigua Street, thus completing our journey on West Foster Street.

Crossing Canandaigua Street we come to East Foster Street, laid out in the early 70's by the late William Foster, whose father was one of Palmyra's earliest settlers, who lived on the farm that this street passes through. William Foster was a public spirited man. He built nearly all the houses on the street and set out all the beautiful maples, making it one of the tidy streets of the village and of this large family the only ones living today are the widow and descendants of the late Edwin Foster.

Beginning at Canandaigua Street and going east on the north side of East Foster Street: The house ob the corner, the Frank Schulte home, was mentioned when we went along Canandaigua Street. The house is followed by a practically new home occupied by John E. Jeffery. Next comes William Reichart, followed by a remodeled house owned by Kenneth Brown of Newark, but occupied by others. Our next is a new house owned and occupied by Frederick C. Thorn and faces Hathaway place, a short street connecting Foster Street and Charlotte A venue, which we will describe later.

After crossing Hathaway Place we come to a house built by the late Clark Barron, a veteran of the Civil War. Jesse B. McClain now lives here. On the east of this is the place occupied for a good many years by the late Thomas Clark, a native of Walworth. Before Mr. Clark's death the place passed to Clyde Gibson by purchase. The next on the east was built by William Foster and was occupied in the 70's by the late Isaac Warren, a mason. This place was occupied by several different ones and finally it passed to George Hibbard, who died February 6, 1930, the estate still retaining the property.

The next is also one erected by William Foster and owned and occupied for several years by the late Isaac Du Rei, whose estate sold to Albert Gilman, who occupied the place for a time and then moved to Rochester, renting the home to Orie Richards, now auditor at the Crandall Packing Company.

The next, which is also a William Foster house, was owned and occupied by several different ones before Adrian Porrey, the present




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occupant, purchased it. The house to the east of the Porrey place was built by Edwin Knox soon after Foster Street was laid out. Knox retained it for a time and later it came into possession of the late Alexander Smith, son of the late Johnny Smith, the cartman, as mentioned before. Later it fell to Thomas, son of Alexander Smith, and at the death of Thomas it passed to his brother, Eugene, whose son, Roy, now owns and occupies the property.

This brings us to the Fred Black house on the corner of Fayette and Foster Streets, which we have mentioned before. Passing over Fayette Street, the corner house, also facing Fayette, is the Peter Vanderwege home.

Next, east of this, is a place built by LaRue & Vanderwege and sold to Andrew Kommer, the present occupant. This is followed by a comparatively new house owned and occupied by Lewis Breen, son of Dennis Breen.

Passing on, we come to the Sellick property with house standing on the eastern side. This place later came into possession of Dennis Breen, whose heirs still own the house and land.

Still passing on we come to two houses, both built by William Foster and his son-in-law, Lyman Hurlbut. The west one is owned and occupied by Eugene C. Guilfoos and the east one is owned by Peter Crowley and rented to others.

On the side hill past the bend in the street stands a house erected a few years ago by George Burke on a four-acre tract. It was sold by him to George Cotton, who still owns and occupies it. This was a part of the old Foster farm and is the last house on the left hand side of the street as we go to the east, so let us go back to Canandaigua Street and continue our journey east on the south side of East Foster Street.

Passing the Mrs. Anna L. Hurlburt 'house on the corner, our next is the Christian Luppold place, which was once a part of the Hurlburt lot. Mr. Luppold moved the present house here, remodeled it and now owns and occupies it.

Our next was erected by William Foster in early day and for many years it has been owned and occupied by John W. Fraher, who was American Express agent under the late Henry P. Knowles for many years.

Our next on the east was built, owned and occupied by the late Joseph Benedict, a veteran of the Civil War and later passed to his son-in-law, Eugene E. Smith, who now owns and lives on the place. Mr. Smith was a clerk in William H. Farnham's Dry Goods store for several years and was later purchasing agent for the Garlock Packing Company and was retired on a pension. At the present he is doing secretarial work for O. J. Garlock and is a Trustee of the Village of Palmyra.

Adjoining the Smith place on the east is another house built by William Foster and owned and occupied by his youngest son, Edwin B., until his death, June 4, 1928. The property is still in the hands of the estate.

Our next house was also erected by William Foster and was owned




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for a time by the late James Vail and later by Jerry Burnett. After several transfers it passed to Owen H. Durkin, the present occupant. The next house which is of the same architecture, was also built by William Foster. For a time it was owned and occupied by the late Albert Pierce and then after several owners, it passed to Mrs. Maria C. Lillie. After her death there were several transactions and finally it passed to Frank Martens, who now lives there.

The next also was a William Foster house. Several different ones owned it and for several years it has been owned and occupied by Carl Hibbard.

Foster also erected the next on the east, and sold it to Asa Chase who lived here several years and then sold to Eber Knowles, a veteran of the Civil War, after whose death it passed to William Tilburg, who still resides here.

The next also was a William Foster house. After many transactions it came into possession of David Cook, who lives here with his mother and riii brother.

The next place was built by William Foster and sold to the late Andrew Sherman, who occupied it several years. After his death it came to Lydia Goldsmith Soper and Victoria J. Smith. Thru legal proceedings it passed to Christian Luppold, who has remodeled and improved the place and is now renting it.

William Foster also built the next place and it is now owned and "occupied by Otto W. Kirchhoff.

Foster also built the Edward Jeffery house on the east of the Kirchhoff house. Mr. Jeffery, a native of England, died January 1, 1931, at the age of eighty-four years and Mrs. Jeffery is still living there.

After passing a vacant lot owned by the McLouth estate, we come to a small place, once owned by Carlton C. M. Hunt. Now a man by the name of De Chard owns it and rents it to others.

After passing another piece of land, which is still in the hands of C. C. M. Hunt, we come to a house at the bend of Foster Street, which was built also by William Foster. Later it: passed to Alfred Wilbur, who sold to Abram Pembroke, who now lives here.

Next to the Pembroke place (going south on Foster Street now) we come to a little house built by George Burke and for a time occupied by Mrs. Katherine Downey (widow of the late Keryan Downey). After her death the heirs sold to Claude Shove, the present occupant. This is the last house inside the corporation line.

Continuing our journey south we come to a ten-acre farm which once belonged to the Foster estate. George Burke purchased this place and after moving a house here and extensively remodeling it, he sold the place to Isaac Shove, who later sold a lot on the southeast back to Mr. Burke. Here Mr. Burke built another house and soon sold it to Arthur Skeels.

This completes our journey on Foster Street which intersects Johnson Street at the Peter Van Bortel place, which faces Johnson Street.

Now let us go back to Hathaway Place, a street of recent date, which




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we mentioned as we came down East Foster from the west. Leading north, it intersects Charlotte A venue, named after Mrs. Charlotte Jenner Birdsall, whose mother was a daughter of Mr. Hathaway, one of the old pioneers of the village and who was the original owner of this land as mentioned before.

Lots were soon sold off on each side of Hathaway Place and houses sprang up rapidly. After passing the Thorn house on the southwest corner as mentioned before, we find, going north on the west side, the following land owners: Vernon G. Belden, Charles Merton Perry, Corwin Beal, Ray Alderman, Arthur J. Barnhart, John P. Redwood, Edmund Hampshire, Arthur D. Trautman, William E. Rush and the Cable house which faces Charlotte Avenue. On the east side, beginning at the McLain home on the southeast corner, which faces Foster Street, we find, going north, a vacant lot still owned by Mrs. Charlotte Birdsall, followed by houses owned by Miss Katherine Durkin, Leo Beck and John Duncan, a lot owned by Leon Miller, then houses by S. M. Soule, Charles A. Waters and Henry E. Mitchell. The corner house, owned by Charles Chase, faces Charlotte Avenue, which is a short street running west from the west side of the south end of Cuyler Street to the east side of Canandaigua Street. On the corner of Cuyler Street and Charlotte Avenue is the Griffith home, which we told about when we journeyed over Cuyler Street.

On the west of the Griffith homestead is a small house which is used as a tenant house for their employees. Next to this on the west is the old Birdsall house, which was moved here from Cuyler Street, as before mentioned. It is still owned by Mrs. Charlotte Birdsall and rented to others.

The next house was once the old Methodist parsonage and stood on Church Street. Dr. W. J. Hennessey bought it when the new parsonage was built and moved it to its present location. It is now owned and occupied by James Dibble, who purchased the place from the LeRoy Stebbins estate.

As we go west, our next place was built by Sanford M. Young, who sold it to its present occupant, William A. German.

The next house which is on the corner of Charlotte Avenue and Canandaigua Street, was built by Henry and Fred Wood on a lot bought from Mrs. Charlotte Birdsall and Dr. Hennessy. It was owned and occupied for a time by them. Later Charles Lawrence owned the place, followed by Miss Julia Murphy.

Crossing over to the south side we will journey back east. The house on the corner was built by Oscar Trumbull and later sold to H. W. Guthrie, who sold to the present occupants, Misses Mildred and Blanche Amidon, and went to California to live.

The house on the! east was built by Albert Quaife, who still lives here.

George Sampson bought the next lot and began the erection of a house here, when he died. Dr. Hennessy then went on and built a double house, which is now' owned by Lucy and Sarah Wardlaw.

Then comes a house built and still owned and occupied by Raymon Hartman.

Our next house was built by Harry Wing and is now owned and




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occupied by Edgar A. Hardy. This brings us to the Cable house on the corner of Charlotte Avenue and Hathaway Place. Crossing Hathaway Place and going east we find the Chase, Hill, Hinkle and Hunt houses, which we mentioned when we came up Cuyler Street.

Railroad Avenue

This completes our tour through the village for the present. Let us now take a stroll down Railroad Avenue and the surrounding country, returning later to note some of the enterprises that have come to our village since the days of General John Swift.

Our first house on the west after crossing the old canal was the home of David Rogers in the 30's. He was a shoemaker whose shop at one time was in the old wooden house on the west side of Market Street, as mentioned before. Mr. Rogers' father was one of the early settlers of Palmyra. His farm was later known as the Budd farm, also the Hammond farm, east of the village, near the trolley.

David Rogers married Mary Conant, a very intelligent and welleducated lady, a native of New Hampshire. They were very hospitable and kind-hearted people.

David's father, Thomas Rogers, was a Revolutionary soldier and was buried in the old Durfee burying ground on Durfee Street.

When the Erie Canal was first built this house was a neat little cottage and one could go into the house on a level, but after the widening of the canal the hill was raised and the gas plant nearly ruined his little home. He always had a fine garden. In his shop he employed three or four men. After his death the late Judge Charles McLouth bought the property and moved the house further north as we now see it. William Shuler now lives here.

Our next house on the north in the early 50's was the home of the widow Hubbard. This family has all passed away and the house has changed hands many times. It is now owned and occupied by George Stark.

Adjoining on the north stands the house built in the early 50's by the late William Cray and in which he lived. This place has changed hands many times also and is now owned by J'Ohn Bremus, sr., who has changed it greatly.

The next house also was built in very early day and is now owned by George Stark. Other houses have since been built. Among them is the George Bavis house and the William Darling house, built in the 70's by Fred V. Cleveland.

Across the way at the intersection of Throop Street is the house built in the 50's by Edwin Knox. In the 60's Mr. Knox sold out and went to Michigan to live.

Ezra Conant, a native of New Hampshire, sold his farm in Green, Chenango County, N. Y., on which he lived, came to Palmyra and bought out Mr. Knox. Mr. Conant died in the 80's and the place came to his son Eugene. After his death, which occurred about 1900, the Business Men's Association of Palmyra purchased the property and gave it to Henry Drake as an inducement to come to Palmyra from Newark and erect a factory




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for making boxes, which proved to be a success. The two houses on the north were built in the 50's by Mr. Nims. One has been moved away to make room for the enlargement of the factory. The other is now occupied by Mrs. Edward Swart.

In early day the flat back of the Darling house was swampy and was covered with cattails and the road was so low that every time it rained the water from the creek would run over the road. Before the Barge Canal went through, the house south of the Barnhart house stood farther south, and was built in the 60's by the late Samuel Frost, who was for many years an engineer on the work train on the New York Central Railroad. He died in the 90's. After the death of Mr. Frost, Mrs. Lillian B. Garlock purchased the property. When the Barge Canal went through the state paid Mrs. Garlock $4,000 for the property. From the state the Williamson brothers bought the house and moved it farther north. Now the place is owned by Robert Collins. Across the way from the original Frost house was Swift's landing.

We now come to an old land mark of over one hundred years. Christian Barnhart came to Palmyra August 17, 1820, procured a grant from the state to build a dam across Mud Creek that he might erect a grist mill, for at that time Mud Creek was a navigable stream as far west as Macedon and was controlled by the state. The next year the mill was completed and in running order. He built the little old house across the way on the east side near the well and lived here.

Mr. Barnhart ran the mill until January 13, 1835, when he died, leaving Lydia, who was his second wife, besides two daughters and two sons, Christian and Almon P. Barnhart. With this family of young children, she could not run the mill. She therefore rented the property to Philip Palmer and moved with her family down the Creek Road to a house west of George Townsend's place, and Mr. Palmer moved into the mill house and carried on the milling business several years. Although an unhandy and hard mill to work in, it was considered one of the best custom mills in the country. They came to this mill from far and near. In those days the old burr stone was used. It was considered quite an accomplishment to know how to dress a stone, and to be a good miller this art he must know in order to make good flour. These stones were large disks, about six feet in diameter and about sixteen inches thick. The lower stone had a square hole in the center and the upper stone or "runner," had a round hole or "eye" through which the grain worked down to be ground. Some of these stones came from Ohio and some came from Pennsylvania.

This old mill had double doors, one above the other, thus shutting out hogs and cattle that frequently ran in the road in those days. The lower door could be shut while the upper one could be opened if one chose. The miller had anything but an easy life in this old TIlill. The hopper where the grain went in was about four feet above the main floor which was reached by a short flight of stairs, and all the grain that went into that hopper had to be carried up those stairs, which was no easy task. Sometimes after high water, the miller would have to grind all night, for the old mill would




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be full of grist waiting to be ground. Many times, through the Winter, the miller would have to grind evenings at the mill to keep up with his work.

Mr. Palmer had the credit of having the largest horse and biggest cow of anyone in town, for at that time Percheron horses and Holstein cows were almost unheard of in this country, and the native stock were very inferior to the blooded stock of today.

Mr. Palmer, after running the mill several years, and the Barnhart boys having grown to manhood and Christian Barnhart going to sea, in 1857, went West and Almon P. came into possession of the mill. But as time passed on more room was required. The old mill, after long years of service, had become somewhat dilapidated and as the process of making flour had materially changed, more modern machinery was called for and the roller process of making flour was fast taking the place of the old burr stone. Accordingly a new mill was projected.

The old rope walk that was located down the Creek Road had now ended its days in that capacity and for a time was used for a cheese factory, but after a short time this enterprise was abandoned and the old building was thrown upon the market for sale. Mr. Barnhart bought the building and moved it to its present location just across the way from the old mill. The old mill was partly torn down and converted into a power house. A shaft passing under the road connected the new mill with the water power. Later electricity was combined with the water power.

Almon P. Barnhart died in 1902. At his death, his son George entered the mill and successfully carried on the business until 1909, when he was killed in an automobile accident. Then his son, Arthur Barnhart, took up the business and is still conducting the mill, he being the fourth generation, all bearing the name of Barnhart.

More than a hundred years have passed since the little old mill was erected on one of the banks of the winding Ganargua and the original Barnhart mill is known only in history, but the new Barnhart mill, across the way, is still a household word.

The little old mill house across the way from the old mill where four generations of Barnharts were born, is still standing.
A. P. Barnhart, born in 1829
G. A. Barnhart, born in 1857
A. J. Barnhart, born in 1883
L. R. Barnhart, born in 1905
At least one out of each generation has run the mill. It is to be hoped the little old mill house will stand another century, and each generation in the future, as in the past, will continue to furnish competent and honest millers as of old. The old mill house is now owned and occupied by Peter De Seyn, sr., who also owned the other house to the south of the mill.

As we leave the old mill and pass on to the north, our first place is a garage run by the Palmyra Chevrolet Company. The little old brick house to the north was erected by the late Ashur Cray, about 1850. A short time previous to building this house, Mr. Cray purchased a few acres of land which he thought contained a bed of clay, suitable for making brick. The




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clay bed was opened and machinery for grinding clay and ovens for baking brick installed, and such other equipment as was necessary for the manufacture of brick, was procured. And from the first brick that was made, this little brick house was built. After making brick several years, he found the brick were rather too soft for building purposes. Then he turned his attention to making drain tile. This business he followed until he became an old man, when the business was discontinued. Mr. Cray died in the 80's. He was a native of Vermont. He came to this country in an early day with his parents. The family consisted of Asher, Daniel, John, William and a daughter, Rhoda. After Mr. Cray's death, Almon P. Barnhart bought the property, now owned by different ones. Peter De Nagle owns and occupies the brick house.

In the 70's Kent Street was opened up. The state built a bridge across the canal, but on account of the heavy cost to the village it never was accepted.

About 1910, the late John C. Clifford came from Fairport to Palmyra and built the large dry house standing on Kent Street, where the farmers found a market for a good many thousand bushels of apples each year. He also built a small house near the road, to the east of the DeN agle place. Mrs. Clifford now owns the property and now, 1930, runs an indoor golf course here.

Several little houses have been built along Kent Street since it was first opened up and each of these has had several different owners and occupants.

About 1910, the New York Central Railroad Company, wishing to do away with the large iron bridge that spanned the creek just east of the West Shore crossing, entered into an agreement with the Trustees of the Village of Palmyra, to move the bridge crossing the original Mud Creek channel that was on the road leading to the depot and north of the West Shore crossing, to its present location.

The corporation line extends to the north bank of. the old channel that is now filled up and leveled off.

Immediately after crossing the old channel we enter upon Jobe Durfee's three hundred acre farm, which he purchased for seventy-five cents an acre, the date being March 7, 1792. The west line began at the old creek bridge, running north through Butler's barns and formed the west line of the Ennis farm. The east line extended to the west line of the old highway leading north up over the hill coming out at the Phillips farm. His log house stood on the site of the Ennis dwelling. Jobe Durfee married Susannah Burdon and died in Palmyra in 1813.

His son, Jobe Durfee, settled in the north part of the town on the Marion road, built a stone house about 1860 and died shortly afterward.

Jobe Durfee, after living in the log house for a time, moved into the one of frame. In the 30's the farm came into the possession of the late Kingsley Miller, followed in the very early 40's by William P. Nottingham, who about 1852, sold the same to the late Elijah Ennis, who was a contractor




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on the Erie Canal and built the culvert from the old gas house to the Galloway malt house.

Soon after Mr. Ennis came'into possession of the property, he made a good many changes in the buildings. The interior of the house was remodeled. He also built the large veranda and rebuilt the barns. This old house, after being transformed into one more modern, being situated on an eminence gave it a commanding view of a large range of country. Mr. Ennis lived here until his death.

After the death of Mr. Ennis, the farm came into the possession of his son-in-law, A. S. Pendry, who died in Florida in 1925. The farm is now in the hands of others.

When Mr. Ennis first came into possession of the property, the Marion road ran on the east line of his farm, going up over the hill and coming out at the Phillips farm as before stated. But immediately after Mr. Ennis' occupancy, a new survey of the road was made. Beginning at a point near the Philips farm and coming out near the Bennett warehouse, its present location. This change was made for the purpose of building a plank road from Palmyra to Pultneyville. This new survey which was more level and direct was a great improvement over the hill route. In the 30's Creeg and Chase had a foundry just east of the New York Central crossing where they made potash kettles, etc. It burned in the early 40's.

In the northwest corner of the Walker and Marion road, we can see a remnant of an old wall that once was a part of the basement of a respectable hotel. These stone were quarried stone. The hotel was built by Henry Butler, who came from Marion in the 60's. The hotel was burned in the 70's and never rebuilt. The site of the hotel is now owned by P. T. Sexton estate.

David Levis bought the old barn and made it into a store house and is now engaged in the produce business.

On the opposite corner, directly east are the Bennett warehouses, erected by Charles W. Bennett in the 70's. Mr. Bennett came to Palmyra from a farm about three miles north of Macedon village. Shortly after coming to Palmyra, he entered into the business of buying farm produce for several years. He also bought wool and pork. He built a large dry house where he dried large quantities of apples and berries. At that time more berries were raised in this vicinity than any other part of the state. In connection with this, he kept a coal yard. At these warehouses a good many men and women were employed. He also found employment for a good many women in the Winter, picking over beans.

In the 90's Mr. Bennett sold out and went to California, where he died a few years later. P. T. Sexton came into possession of the property and for a good many years these large, fine buildings were practically unoccupied, where only a few years before, a large stroke of business was carried on. Now all was still.

In 1923 Mr. Sexton sold the property to the Palmyra Packing Company, when again the wheels of industry were set in motion in these warehouses,




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and the hum of machinery once more filled the air. But this was of but short duration when the business was closed out.

Early in 1929 the Forman Company bought the entire warehouse and have made extensive repairs. They have opened up a pickling and kraut factory and are known as one of the greatest assets to our community.

On a little knoll on the northeast corner of the old road east of the Ennis farm in 1845, stood a little old wood-colored school house, erected at a very early date and was one of the oldest school houses, if not the oldest, in the town of Palmyra, outside the village. The late James Galloway, in his younger days, came here to school; also Lucina Brown, who subsequently married Josiah Nottingham, oldest son of William P. Nottingham. Mrs. Nottingham was over ninety years old when she died and lived with her daughter, Mrs. John Herbert on Division Street, in sight of her old home. She was the daughter of the late George Brown, who came from Providence, R. I., at an early date and settled on what is called the Walker farm, on the Walker Road, of which more will be said as we advance in our journey.

Now Thomas L. Cook is the only one living that went there to school. He went there to school in 1845. At that time the little old school house was very much dilapidated. A good many of the clapboards had been torn off, the seats and benches had been whittled and carved by many a boy who wanted to try out his jack knife. In those days, goose quills were saved, that had been gathered up from the goose pasture to be made into pens by the teacher, who had to be equipped with a pen knife and a knowledge of how to make and mend a pen. This was the last time a school was ever kept there, as it had become too cold and dilapidated for further use. What would the boys and girls of today think of going to school in the Winter in a school house where the clapboards were nearly half off, heated by a box stove that burned wood? The teacher, many times, boarded around through the district. Miss Charlotte Conant, a native of New Hampshire, was the last teacher.

The little knoll on which the school house stood has been dug away and a dwelling house is standing on the same site, owned and occupied by Albert West.

The little school house has passed from memory. The road has been closed and all forgotten. But the little brook back in the hollow, in which we used to wade during our noon hour is still running joyously on, singing its sweet refrain as in days gone by, and to me the memories of that little brook are the sweet and indelible remembrance of the past I love to cherish.

On the site of the little old schoolhouse stands two houses, erected many years ago. James White owns and occupies the first and has done so for many years, while the one on the east is owned by Peter De Seyn, sr., and occupied by others.

Next to the De Seyn house is a large house erected in recent years on the western part of the Storms farm. This house is now occupied by George Storms and family, yet it belongs to the original Storms farm.

The large two-story house on the east was built by Edward Durfee, a son of Gideon Durfee, which has been repaired and improved. This house




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was built in an early day, and was when first built, painted red and retained that color for a great many years. For a long time this has been known as Durfee Street. In the early 40's a Mr. Matherson owned and occupied this farm. Every year for a long time, Mr. Matherson had a field of broom corn across the way, which he worked up into brooms. After the death of Mr. Matherson, the place was sold and for a long time it has been in the Storms family. It is now a double house, one part being occupied by Bert Storms and the other by the son, Russell.

Adjoining on the east lies a little farm with, an orchard, owned in the 60's by Dr. Pitkin. On this farm there were no buildings. After the death of Mr. Pitkin it came to his two sons, who have erected summer cottages on it. The place is still in the Pitkin family and this little settlement is known as Pitkinville.

Our next house on the east is where Lydia Barnhart, wife of Christian Barnhart, who ran the Barnhart mill, came after the death of her husband, as mentioned before. The old house is still standing and bids fair to afford shelter for a long time to come. It is now owned by George Neale.

We now come to the old Townsend homestead. Gideon and Edward Durfee came from Triverton, R. I., to the Genesee Country in the Summer of 1790, on foot, in search of a place of settlement. They stopped with Isaac Hathaway in Farmington, but preferred the lands in No. 12. They purchased of Swift, to whom the sale was most opportune. He was unable to meet his payment to Phelps and Gorham, but the purchase of one thousand and six hunQred acres, for which coin was given, enabled him to secure a warranty deed of the town.

In the Fall, Gideon returned East, and gave so favorable a report, the entire family decided to remain. During the early part of 1791, Gideon came back, accompanied by Isaac Springer. They came with oxen and sled and consumed seventeen and a half days on the way. The Durfee tract has long been known as Durfee Street. Edward Durfee and Isaac Springer, assisted Gideon in building a double log house which he opened up for a tavern, cleared six acres and without plowing, planted it to corn. They also planted apple seeds and from them grew the old orchard of the Durfee family, the first cultivated apples in town.

Later Pardon Durfee planted with garden and fruit seeds, the seeds of a pear, from which originated a seedling given by Mr. Durfee to his brother-in-law, Weaver Osban, who brought it into bearing. In this way the "Osban Pear" was grown, a variety regarded as the best of Summer pears and raised in nurseries.

Another journey was made East and the final remove was made by wagon on the old Military Road to Geneva. Pardon and Jobe came on with their families and reached their new home almost without food. They were gladdened to find the corn fit for roasting and their six acres yielded three hundred bushels. Some of this was sold at Schenectady. It was the first corn from a region as far westward as Palmyra.

Pardon Durfee came out on foot, driving the stock and arrived well nigh exhausted with hunger and fatigue. His first inquiry was for food. The reply was given with emotion, "We have none." Webb Harwood was




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expected back from the mill at Jerusalem (now Penn Yan) at every hour and was received with gladness.

Soon after, the rest of the family came out and all seemed prosperous, when fever attacked them, and seventeen of twenty-two were prostrated at one time. The latter arrivals were Gideon Durfee, the older and Jobe, Stephen and Ruth. Lemuel came in during 1794. Ruth Durfee married Captain William Wilcox. This was the first marriage in the town. Mrs. Wilcox died at the age of eighty-three years, on November 13, 1858. The descendants of Gideon Durfee were eleven children and ninety-six grandchildren.

The latest survivors were Mrs. Wilcox and Stephen Durfee of whom more will be said as we advance in our journey.

Speaking of Gideon Durfee's double house which was opened up for a tavern: Among the guests who enjoyed the hospitality of this old log tavern were Louis Philippe of France in 1796, who on his return from Niagara, stopped over night in the log tavern. Louis Philippe subsequently became king of France.

In 1793 the female family were all sick and the wife of David Wilcox crossed the creek daily to render assistance. Stephen Durfee, then a small boy, went with her to carry the baby, Mary, the first female child born in the settlement and afterward the wife of Alva Handee, as before mentioned. They crossed the creek upon the trunk of a large basswood tree that had been felled with a stump so high that boats could pass beneath the log and not be obstructed. This log for many years, was the only bridge over the creek.

Later Gideon Durfee built a frame house near the site of the log house. Gideon Durfee died September 12, 1814, at the age of seventy-six. His wife died October 20, 1821, at the age of eighty-three.

After the death of Gideon Durfee the old homestead came into the possession of his son-in-law, Edward S. Townsend, who married his daughter, Maria Durfee. Edward S. Townsend was a son of Jesse Townsend.

On November 22, 1836, Edward S. Townsend and Maria, his wife, and Ruth Durfee, sold the old Durfee homestead to Jonathan Townsend, forwhich he paid $7,706.75. At the death of Jonathan Townsend the farm came to his son, George H. Townsend, who after living in the old house a while, built the present house on the site of the old one, which was moved to the west and used as a tenant house. After serving in this capacity for over forty years, it finally burned. The late Harvey Taskett was the builder of the new house. Mr. Townsend died and the farm went to his son, George, who now owns and occupies it.

Just back of the present house stands a little old building about 15x20 feet, another old landmark in which long years ago a private school was taught for the accommodation of two or three families. One of the pupils was the daughter of Edwin S. Townsend, who subsequently became Mrs. Charles C. B. Walker.

There is yet one thing more that demands our respect and admiration as an old landmark at this pioneer home. It is the old well that is near




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the road that has been surrounded by lattice work for over ninety years, with pulley wheel and bucket on the inside, by which water has been drawn. This old shelter is of the same pattern as when first built. Here at this old well, many a traveler called to slake his thirst. The water in this well had the distinction of being unsurpassed as to coldness and purity. We now resume our journey, but not, however, until we pay homage to this oasis by the wayside, by taking a draught of the sweet nectar from the old moss-covered bucket that still hangs in the well.

Adjoining the Townsend farm on the east, Pardon Durfee, son of Gideon Durfee, established a rope walk on the south side of the road, running east from the little brook, where he manufactured ropes until his death, which occurred on April 28, 1828. The business was then carried on by Edward Townsend. A man by the name of Pooley was the manager, who lived in a little brick house near the factory. The house was burned several years ago.

At the west end of the factory stood the large main building, which was moved away for the Barnhart mill, as mentioned before. The building in which the ropes were twisted was a low building about ten feet high and perhaps twenty feet wide, made of rough hemlock board and the roof was covered with shingles. This building was about fifteen rods long.

The late Orlando Stoddard, son of Simeon Stoddard, learned the rope making trade at this factory and served seven years. At this factory a very large and long rope was made and taken to Wilkes-Barre, Pa., to haul the cars on the Lehigh over the ridge. The rope was made in the Winter and had to be carried on a sleigh which had to be made on purpose for it. It took six horses to draw the load. Orlando Stoddard was delegated to deliver the rope.

In the early 50's the rope business was discontinued and the late Martin Butterfield became owner of the farm. The old long building served for several years for a tobacco shed, when finally it was torn down and the name of the Durfee rope walk has passed into history.

Mr. Butterfield, in the 60's, sold the farm to the late Captain Ira Lakey, who had been a sailor a good many years and had made two successful voyages around the world on a whaling vessel in the 50's.

Retiring from a seafaring life, he bought a farm in the town of Marion on which he lived until the 60's, when he sold out and bought the Butterfield farm, where he spent the remainder of his life, dying about 1883. Being personally acquainted with Mr. Lakey for several years during the latter part of his life, I take great pleasure in writing the following, taken from the memoirs of Rev. Horace Eaton, D. D., written by his wife, Anna R. Eaton:

"Ira Lakey, son of Abner Lakey of Palmyra, had learned the watch and clock-making business, but the way seemed obstructed. Good offers induced him to enter the whaling service at New Bedford. He first went out as a sailor, was soon promoted and took command of the bark "Harvest." I give you here what he told me himself: The owners of the ship were generous to him and he felt his responsibility to bring them a good return.




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He sped to the southern Pacific. On the coast of Kusaic, or Strong's Island, one of the Carolinas, he was stranded on a coral reef, and a huge rent made in his vessel. Captain Lakey's hopes were dashed, but he did not give up the ship. He had no tools with which to make repairs, but such as his own ingenuity could invent. Fortunately one of the crew could speak the language of the people. The king, at that time was dangerously sick. As it was, this pagan chief gladly accepted his offer to prescribe for him. Captain Lakey watched and studied the king's case with the utmost attention. He recovered. Nothing could exceed his gratitude and that of his subjects. They brought, day by day, to the seamen, fish, pigeons, bananas, the fruit of the pandanus tree, and the cocoanut palm. Captain Lakey rigged a home-made jack, and ropes and pulleys, and with the help'of one hundred or more of the natives, whom he hired of the king, he pulled the vessel upon its side. He, himself, made the plank. The island afforded fine timber. He took the copper from the upper part of the ship, where it was not so much needed and covered the bottom. In like manner he repaired the other side of the vessel. All this took some three months. "Good King George" and Captain Lakey hrad many conversations together. A great friendship sprang up between the captain and the king's little son, a bright boy of four or five years old.

"The king was most desirous to learn about the United States and the reason why the people were so much better off than in his own country. He insisted that Captai.n Lakey read and preach from the Bible to them every Sabbath day. In relating this, the Captain said, 'I couldn't do it as well as you, parson, but I did as well as I could.' The wild and unclad savages listened with the utmost attention, and when Captain Lakey left Kusaic, the king obtained a promise from him that he would do his utmost to send them missionary teachers. For this purpose he sailed two thousand miles out of his way to interview Rev. S. C. Damon, D. D., seamans' chaplain at Honolulu, Sandwich Islands, with whom he was well acquainted. To him he presented their appeal. Wonderful to tell, it came at just the right time. It exactly met the awakened interest of the Sandwich Island Christians. They at once organized a Missionary Society. In 1852, their missionaries, with their wives and two Hawaiian teachers, went out to Kusaic. Finding that they needed a small ship to wait upon them as they cruised among the islands, they wrote to the rooms of the Board at Boston. A responsive thrill went through the Sabbath schools of the land and the first "Morning Star," a brigantine, costing $18,351, was launched in November, 1856.

"Twenty years after Captain Lakey's shipwreck, he visited again the old landing place. But how changed. The former king was dead. The young prince, a Christian ruler, remembered him. Under his lead and that of the missionaries, the people, now neatly dressed, assembled on the shore in an orderly manner, and formally greeted their benefactor by singing sweet songs and hymns of praise to God. The new Testament and Christian books had been introduced, the Sabbath was observed, and the voice of prayer went up from their families and their churches."




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After the death of Mr. Lakey, which occurred in the 80's, the farm was sold to the late Hiram Clark, a veteran of the Civil War, and after owning it for several years it was sold to Albert Mitchell.

On this farm is the old Durfee burying ground, where over two hundred of the early settlers were buried. This was the first burying ground in town. The first burial was a child of Gideon Durfee, and a short time after, James Rogers, father of General Thomas Rogers, was the first adult.

But as time passed on and kin and kindred had nearly passed away, the pioneer burying ground had been forgotten. The fence that once surrounded it had long since gone to decay and hogs had been permitted to roam at large and root up the turf that covered the graves of the buried dead. In 1925 the Town Board ordered Hiram O. Young, who was at that time Superintendent of Highways, in the town, to build a suitable fence around the lot.

Adjoining the Mitchell farm on the east, in the 30's, was the home of Zebulen Reeves. In the 60's, Abel Chase owned and occupied the place; later Horace Pullman owned it and since his death, which occurred in the 90's', it has been owned by different ones.

The farm adjoining on the east, in the 70's, was owned by a Mr. Butler, later by Willard Page and now by Isaac Cook.

As we advance in our journey, we come to an old-fashioned, low, New England house, built by Weaver Osban, a son-in-law of Gideon Durfee, who married his second daughter, Hannah. This old farm has been divided into three farms, nearly all the same size. The late William Walton once owned the original homestead. Fellers, Warfield and others have been owners of this old farm. The famous Osban pears originated on t4is farm.

East of Osban's was the William Wilcox farm and home. This was another typical old New England home. This old house stood at the foot of Wilcox hill on the south side of the road and has long since been torn down and the old barn moved across the way. The little house on the west on the south side of the road was once the home of Philo Wilcox. William Wilcox was the husband of Ruth Durfee.

As we pass on up over the hill, on the corner in the 30's, lived a family of Quakers by the name of Eddy, who in the Winter when they came to town, rode in an old-fashioned, covered sleigh, a very plain affair. In the 50's, the late John Chapman, grandfather of John C. Coates, left his farm on the Walworth road to his son, Robert, and moved to this little farm where he lived until his death. Since then the little farm has had several different owners. Among some of them were Charles Grant and Isaac Cook. The house burned in 1927.

As we resume our journey, our next farm was once owned by the late Samuel Beckwith, brother of Col. George Beckwith, as before mentioned. It was owned in the late 30's by an Englishman by the name of Robinson. In the early 50's, William Coates, father of John C. Coates, bought this farm. After living here a few years, he sold the same to a man by the name of Harrington. Later it came into the possession of Fred L. Reeves. Mr. Reeves and wife died several years ago, leaving the farm to their children, who are occupying it now.




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The next house on the east was built by Samuel Post. After living here for a time the farm passed to Nelson Reeves. After his death, the farm passed to his son, Spencer, who still owns and occupies the farm. The little house across the way, in the 50's, was owned and occupied by the late Reeves Culver. Since then it has been owned by different ones.

As we continue our journey, the old, low, New England house on the north side of the road was once the home of Stephen Post, while across the road, James Harrison came at an early date and built the grist mill on Mud Creek, which he operated during his life time, when it passed to his son, George Harrison. At his death, his son James came into possession of the mill. Shortly after coming into possession of the property he made very extensive improvements, which made it an up-to-date mill, thus retaining its reputation of old. Since the death of Mr. Harrison the mill had stood idle. George Harrison's son, Charles, came into possession of the farm and now occupies the same. On the old homestead George Harrison built the fine, large house that his son, Charles now occupies. Being connected with the mill makes this an old landmark.

Our next house is the Fellers house which James Harrison, jr., bought soon after coming into possession of the mill. Here he lived and brought up his family. After his death his widow moved on West Main Street and the homestead is occupied by strangers.

We now come to the old Dwight Foster farm. Mr. Foster died several years ago. After his death the farm was sold to Orie Tack, who built a fine new house on the site of the old one in which he is now living.

We now come to Deacon Foster's house where they commenced the survey of the Montezuma Turnpike.

This now completes our journey on Durfee Street. While on our trip we have visited the home of many a pioneer; through imagination we have sat by and enjoyed the old fire place, with back log shedding its radiant heat, while the amber smoke found its way up the stick chimney. We have heard the hum of the wheel and the vigilant stroke of the loom; we have eaten bread made from meal ground in a mortar; we have, through imagination, seen the King of France, enjoying the hospitality of a pioneer's cabin. But, alas, the old pioneers have long since passed away. Others are pressing the ground with their feet where once they trod, and only the glimmering light of history reveals to us the past.

Let us now return to the depot. Adjoining Jobe Durfee's three hundred acre farm on the west, was Isaac Thayer's two hundred acre farm. The line between the two farms began at the old creek bridge and ran north through Crane's barn as mentioned before. This would leave the depot and freight house on the Thayer farm and extending north including the Morris D. Beadle farm and the C. C. B. Walker farm.

The first building erected where the New York Central depot now stands, was a long log house where Zebulen Williams lived and had a store in one part of the house for several years. He was the first who paid cash for wheat, the price being three shillings a bushel and he was known as the pioneer merchant. Mr. Williams came to Palmyra from Seneca County, about 1805. He returned to Seneca County and the old log store was converted




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by William Cook into a cooper shop where whiskey and pork barrels were manufactured. Later this became Sarah Grinnell's garden and orchard. Mrs. Grinnell lived in a little white house on the north side of the Walker Road. She had a son, Humphrey, who used to sell vegetables in the village. When the New York Central Railroad went through it destroyed her property, when she sold out and moved to Farmington where she died.

Adjoining this on the west, a man by the name of Cooper fitted up a place and kept a hotel for awhile, which later came into the possession of A. P. Barnhart.

The next two houses were fitted up in the 70's by a Mr. Mosher, who came from the East, and who later sold out and moved away and a Mr. H Barrett of New York City lived here for al while when he moved away.

The next in order was the home of the late William Whipple, who built this house in the early 50's. and was the first baggage master at the New York Central Station. He held that position until he became too old to perform the duties required of him and gave up the position. He died about 1896. His wife was a daughter of the late Isaac McCumber, the carpenter. She died in Marion several years later, being nearly ninety-six years old at the time of her death.

Nearly across the way the New York Central Railroad Company had: a large reservoir that supplied the engines with water at the time they burned wood.

Adjoining on the north is the old Quaker Orthodox meeting house, erected by that society in an early day and used as a place of worship by that society until in the 40's when the society began to dwindle and the meetings were given up, and the old meeting house was sold and converted into a dwelling house, once owned and occupied by the Parliman family, and the name Orthodox meeting house has passed into history and the old Quakers and their families have all passed away.

Our next in line and adjoining on the north is the little thirty-acre farm which in the early 20's w,as owned and occupied by a Mr. Gregg, whose daughter married the late Dr. Durfee Chase. It was this man Gregg, who carried on the old foundry east of the railroad crossing in company with Chase, as before mentioned. The old building burned several years later.

In the early 50's this little farm came by purchase into the possession of the late John Calhoon, who was the first ticket and freight agent at the New York Central station. When Mr. Calhoon came into possession of this little farm he remodeled the house and barn, besides making many other substantial improvements, thus making this an attractive place. He died after living here a few years. His widow, who was a daughter of the late Anthony Breese of Macedon, who owned and occupied the brick house and farm west of Walworth Station, sold the farm to Allen Moore, who in the 60's sold the same to Morris Beadle, who followed shipping cattle, sheep and hogs for a good many years, until there was not stock enough raised in this vicinity to make it pay. He also brought stock from the West and




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Canada. After following this business a good many years, he became old and gave up the business. He died in the 90's and the little farm passed to Pliny T. Sexton. Neglect and the ravages of time have wrought great changes in this property.

Away back in the days of Isaac Thayer, across the way from the Beadle farm, stood a little house which was the home of the blacksmith, who had a shop hard by. The business was discontinued after a short duration, but the little house served as a tenant house for a good many years. In the early 40's a Mr. Wilber lived there. In the 60's, the late George Moore moved from his farm, three miles west of Walworth, now known as the Leander Baker farm, to this place. In the 80's he was killed by the cars. A few years later the house was burned and the little old house is remembered only by a few. This now brings us to the end of this little settlement.

All these little places, including the Zebulon Williams store, came off the east end of the Thayer farm. At the time the log store was built and started it was the first store in town, and some thought the village would eventually be located here, but on account of the fever and ague, the present location was chosen.

Resuming our journey to the north, we come to the George Brown farm. Mr. Brown came here in 1810, from Providence, R. I., and settled on this farm of one hundred eighty acres. After living in a log house for awhile, he built the brick house, now owned by Miss Drake, a Walker heir. Mr. Brown died in 1847, leaving the widow, three sons and three daughters. The oldest son, Otis, went to California in 1849, shortly after gold had been discovered in that country. He joined the ranks of thousands of others who went to that far-off country, to seek their fortune. At that time there were no railroads or steam ships and the only way to go to California was by wind and tide around Cape Horn in a sailing vessel. This monotonous journey consumed many months before reaching San Francisco, California. While upon shipboard, going around Cape Horn, he had his twenty-first birthday.

In the 60's, Sidney, his younger brother, went to California, where they both died, never returning to their native land. Spencer died when a young man. Thus passed away the three sons, Otis, Sidney and Spencer.

Of the three daughters, Lucina, the eldest, was born in 1830. At the age of seventeen years she married Josiah Nottingham, son of Mr. and Mrs. William P. Nottingham, the first proprietor of the Palmyra Hotel, built in 1838. Mr. and Mrs. Josiah Nottingham traveled to Rochester in a carriage on their honeymoon trip. Railroads were not in existence at that time. Mr. Nottingham died several years ago. After the death of her husband, she went to live with her daughter, Mrs. John Porter Herbert, on Division Street, where she lived a good many years in plain sight of the home of her girlhood. Her last birthday was February 216, 1926, being ninety-six years old at the time of her death. She died April 22, 1926. Her entire life was spent in this vicinity.

Rowena Brown married John Jarvis. She died a good many years ago.




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Belle Brown died a good many years ago. Thus has passed away this large family.

In the Summer, Mr. Brown wore what then was called an Abolition Hat. This kind of hat had a high crown and was of sea weed color. His peddling rig was a black horse and a one-horse lumber wagon. This wagon, he would fill with apples and potatoes and start for town. He was called to Sacketts Harbor for a short time during the War of 1812.

There are but very few living around Palmyra today that ever knew that a man by the name of Brown ever lived here or who built the house, or of Edwin Townsend, who bought the farm after the death of Mr. Brown. Mr. Townsend made a great many changes on the house and otherwise improved the property. In the 70's, C. C. B. Walker, who had spent a portion of his younger days in Palmyra, finally went to Corning to live. While living there he was elected member of Congress. For a time he was very extensively engaged in the lumber business out of which he made a fortune. But the love for old Palmyra, in all those long years of absence, never forsook him. He finally came back and purchased from Mr. Townsend, the old George Brown farm, and made very extensive improvements on house, barn and grounds. He built the large iron fence in front, that will for a long time bear silent testimony for at least a part he had done to make this beautiful sightly place his Summer home. For many years Mr. Walker and family enjoyed this fine home, returning each Spring until his death, which occurred in the 80's. His widow died several years later. After Mrs. Walker's death a relative by the name of Drake came into possession of the property and still retains the homestead for their Summer home as in days gone by.

The commanding view from the old George Brown homestead will ever be delightful to the eye, and in the summertime the depths of green in valley and on hillside will ever lend its fascinating charm, and friend or stranger who passes that way will love to linger to view this beautiful landscape that lies before him.

Mr. Walker also bought two other farms north of the Brown farm. The first farm adjoining on the north that he bought, was the Kingsley Miller farm of forty-four acres, who came from the Jobe Durfee farm as mentioned before. He came here in the late 30's and also kept the Franklin tavern, also before mentioned. In the 50's Mr. Miller sold out to the late George Smith, a Quaker, and again moved into town. Mr. Smith was a speculator, who bought wool and cattle. But after a time he became an old man and wishing to retire to a more quiet life, in the 70's he sold the farm to Mr. Walker and moved into town to live with his brother-in-law, Ambrose Lapham, who was a bachelor, and built the fine brick house on the south side of West Jackson Street, as before mentioned.

After Mr. Walker purchased the property he made a great many improvements. The house was made very much larger and large, fine barns were built and many other changes were made.

Several years after the death of Mrs. Walker, all their fine barns were burned and now all there remains to be seen of those fine barns are the




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crumbling foundation walls. This little farm was a part of the Nathan Harris tract and joined Isaac Thayer on the south.

We will now pass on to the next farm, which also belonged to the Nathan Harris tract. In the late 40's it was owned by the late Jacob Stupplebean, who married the daughter of George Smith, the Quaker. There were two sons, George and Charles. They have long since passed away. Several years ago a man by the name of Skeels purchased the property.

Passing on north on the west side and back from the road, in the long ago, stood an old, wood-colored house, where in the 50's William Jeffery, the village blacksmith, with shop on Canal Street, lived on this little five-acre farm. He died in the 70's and the little place went into other hands. Now a new house stands here, erected a few years ago.

As we pass along we can see another house standing back from the road. This is a two hundred and eleven acre farm that Nathan Harris sold to a man by the name of Taft, in an early day, who was killed by lightning in 1799. A rain storm came on and he went under a tree for shelter, when a stroke of lightning tore a large limb from the tree, which falling, struck and killed him instantly.

It was in the year 1810 when Aretus Lapham came from Providence, R. I, coming from the same place as his neighbor, Mr. Brown, and bought this two hundred eleven acres of land. After living in a log house for a time, he built the present stone house. During the War of 1812, he was called for a short time to Sackett's Harbor. Mr. Lapham had two sons and one daughter. The latter married Perry Parker, son of Seth Parker. His son, Nelson, was an invalid for a good many years, dying in the 50's. After the death of the father, the farm was left to his son, Norman, who in the 70's sold the farm to C. C. B. 'Walker, making him now the owner of four hundred twenty-five acres of land.

Mr. Lapham moved into town and after a short time bought a house on Jackson Street, where he lived until his death, which occurred in the 80's. His wife died a few years later, leaving two daughters, Misses Emily and Helen, who are living at the same place. About 1920 the Lapham farm was sold to a man by the name of Mason.

Adjoining the Lapham farm on the north, we now come to the old Peter Harris farm, which also belonged to the Nathan Harris tract. Mr. Harris came here in the 30's and bought this little thirty-acre farm. He and his wife, "Aunt Nabby," as she was called, lived a good many years. Mr. Harris was once a sailor. While on the farm he became a Quaker preacher. At his death, which occurred in the early 50's, this little thirty acre farm passed into the hands of Nelson Lapham, as before mentioned. After the death of Mr. Lapham, the farm came into the hands of William Welch. Since Mr. Welch's death, the farm has been owned by different ones. The old house is still standing, but plainly showing the ravages of time. It is one of the old landmarks. In Mr. Harris' time this was a quaint old house, standing near the road, with a little porch enclosed by lattice work with double doors, one above the other, with well and pulley wheel




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at one end. Although but few changes have been made in this old-time house, yet the charm of long ago has gone forever and Uncle Peter and Aunt Nabby are nearly forgotten.

Passing on a little farther and to the right, we come to the remnant of a once primeval forest, that belongs to the estate of Henry R. Durfee. Here in this forest on the side of the hill is the site where once stood the Hicksite Quaker meeting house, of which more will be said later.

The Hicksite meeting house was on the farm of Lemuel Durfee, son of Gideon Durfee, who was one of Palmyra's earliest settlers. Lemuel took up this tract of land of two hundred fifty acres at an early date. At the northwest, a little distanee from the old meeting house, stands the old Durfee homestead, and at the northeast stands the house where Henry Rees Durfee, son of Bailey Durfee and grandson of Lemuel Durfee, was born. After the death of Lemuel Durfee, the widow lived at the homestead until her death, when her son Bailey Durfee, came into possession of the farm.

Passing on east is the stone house on the corner where Gad Higbee lived in the 40's, who had two daughters and one son, Myron, who died in 1856. One daughter married Edgar Jordon; the other married his brother.

After the death of Mr. Higbee, the farm was sold to George Stoddard. Later it was owned and occupied by Hiram Harrington, a native of Washington County. After his death it came into the possession of David Jeff ery, by purchase, who still owns and occupies the farm.

Leaving the Jeffery farm, we will take a short stroll up the north road and call at the Seth Parker homestead, another old pioneer, who was born in Delaware County, N. Y., about 1783. He came with sleigh and horses to Palmyra in 1816, bought two hundred acres of land and erected a log house. As the family increased, the log house became too small, so a small frame house was built about 1820. About 1828 the present brick house was built. The brick came from a yard near the New York Central depot, but not the Cray brick yard. His family now consisted of three sons and three daughters. He kept buying land until he owned at one time about five hundred acres.

At his death the homestead and about three hundred acres of land came into the possession of his son, Lorenzo, who in the 60's moved into the village, on West Main Street, as before mentioned. He still kept the farm. Now the farm is owned by other parties.

Mr. Parker drew wood into Palmyra, receiving only fifty cents a cord for four-foot wood. The price for chopping was twenty-five cents a cord. Now other farms are between the Seth Parker place and the Higbee place, one on the east side being owned by Leon Cator, who purchased a part of the Parker farm. This is as far north as we will go on this road.

Returning to the corner and looking east, we can see a large two-story white house, standing on a hill. This farm was, in an early day, owned by Joseph Parker, brother of Seth Parker. In the 40's it came into the possession of Ira Holmes. He had two sons and one daughter. The sons were Ira and Alfonzo. The daughter married Moses Jones, a native of




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Massachusetts, and moved to Chicago. Alfonzo married a daughter of the late Robert McKnutt of Farmington.

After the death of Ira Holmes, sr., Henry Whitlock bought the farm and lived here until his death, which occurred in the 80's, and the farm went to his son, Theodore. It is now owned and occupied by Alfred East, and Mr. Whitlock moved to the Marvin Hill farm, which we will have pointed out to us as we advance in our journey.

Let us return to the Durfee homestead. Bailey Durfee's son, Henry, was a lawyer, and lived in the village of Palmyra, where he practiced law until his death, which occurred about 1915, leaving a wife and no children. It was his desire to leave the farm to someone bearing the name of Durfee. But as time passes on and changes come, the younger generation will know but very little of the past, and the old pioneer farm will be divided into smaller farms, and all the future generations will know of this pioneer farm is what history will reveal. West of the house where now stands an old orchard, is the little old family burying ground, encircled by an iron fence, but as no provisions were made for its care, the little iron gate is broken and. the little pioneer's resting place is neglected, and large trees have been permitted to grow above the graves, that the winter winds may sing their requiem, as they rustle through their branches.

As we leave the old burying ground and continue our journey westward, we arrive at the top of the hill and pass along down its westward slope, where once occurred a fatal accident, on July 4, 1844, which saddened the hearts of the whole community. The wife of Emory Durfee, and her hired girl, had been to the village, and on returning home when they came to the top of this hill, the hired girl insisted upon getting out of the wagon, taking a young child she had in her arms. After getting out of the wagon, Mrs. Durfee started on down the hill. She had gone but a short distance when a strap in the harness broke, the horse became frightened and started to run. Mrs. Durfee undertook to jump out of the wagon. She became entangled in the reins and was dragged some distance. When they came to a little bridge, part way down the hill, the reins caught in one of the plank, which was fastened down with wooden pins, as was customary in those days, instead of being spiked down. The hair that was pulled out of her head could be plainly seen on those wooden pins. She was carried into a log house part way down the hill and lived but a short time. Her maiden name was Carr and she was said to be very handsome. Her husband was the son of the late Stephen Durfee, who was a brother of the late Lemuel Durfee, as before mentioned, and son of Gideon Durfee, one of the old pioneers, who lived at the corner just west. At the time of the accident he was living with his father.

Stephen Durfee was the son of Gideon and Annie Bowman Durfee, of Triverton, R. I., where he was born, April 4, 1776. He died at the old home in Palmyra, April 14, 1854. He was married three times, and by his first wife had twelve children, but none by the second or. third wife.

One of his daughters, Mary, married the late Elisha Brown, December 2, 1845, and died December 9, 1881. Mr. Brown lived on the farm and cared for Mr. Durfee as long as he lived. At his death Mr. Brown bought




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the farm, and later moved the old house back for a barn and built a fine house. In those two houses he lived and brought up a large family. At his death the old homestead shared the fate of many another, and passed into the hands of strangers.

Speaking of Mr. Durfee: After living in a log house for a time, a new frame house was projected, and the site of the present house was chosen, which was in the same dooryard as the old one. In those days, timbers were selected in the woods, and instead of being sawed as is the custom of today, they were scored and hewed, and many days would be spent to prepare it for the raising. When all was ready, a bee was made, and the whole neighborhood was invited to come and help raise the heavy timbers. After the raising, refreshments were served and liquor was passed around. The raising of a building was a sort of holiday in the neighborhood. But Mr. Durfee did not approve of this custom. The neighbors upon being invited to this raising, were notified there would be no whiskey handed around. This new custom gave Mr. Durfee the distinction of being the first one in town to raise a building without whiskey. A remnant of the old house is still standing in the rear of the new one.

His son, William, about the time he was married, purchased a farm adjoining on the north, erected a house and barn, living here a good many years, and bringing up a large family, which had now grown up and left home, leaving only himself and wife to carryon the farm. This being too much of a burden, with his advancing years, he measured off twenty-five acres on the south end of the farm, erected a house and barn, moved to his new home and sold the remainder of the farm to Elias Barnes, a native of Sullivan County. Mr. Durfee died in the 70's and the little farm was sold to the late William Chapman. At his death, which occurred in the 80's, it passed by purchase, to Eber Knowles, who was a veteran of the Civil War. After a few years he sold out and moved into the village where he died on East Foster Street about 1910, being about eighty-five years old.

Mr. Barnes lived on the Durfee farm several years when he sold out to the late James Galloway and moved back to Sullivan County. Mr. Galloway's son, Jerome, worked the farm a few years, when the farm was sold to William E. Spier, who still owns it.

Speaking of William Durfee: On his father's farm, just south of the old homestead and at the east end of the road running west, William had a sawmill on a small stream that had water in plenty, only in the Spring of the year. This little mill was kept going day and night as long as the water lasted. Later an engine was put in. But after a time logs became scarce, the old mill had served its time, and the enterprise was abandoned. The old da.m has long since been torn away. Where logs were piled up in the Winter, to await the Spring sawing, now stands a house, and the old sawmill has passed into history.

The next farm adjoining on the north was that of the late Guerdon Tracy Smith.

The following account was given by the late William B. Billings to the Macedon Historical Society, and being well acquainted with both




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gentlemen in my younger days, I take great pleasure in quoting these few lines of so worthy a man.

"Guerdon Tracy Smith was born in Galway, Saratoga County, N. Y., May 3, 1806. His father, Uria Smith, moved his family to Palmyra, Ontario County, N. Y., when Guerdon was about six years old. He moved into a log house on the Marion road about one mile south of that village. His father died January 23, 1812, of spotted fever, after an illness of five days.

"Lemuel Durfee, living about one mile north of the present New York Central Station in Palmyra, and grandfather of the late Henry Reese Durfee, took the little boy, Guerdon, to bring up, although there were eleven children in the Durfee family. Guerdon was taught honesty, frugality, and industry, and was literally brought up under the very shadow of the old Quaker meeting house, situated in the woods just south of the house on the premises. This meeting house has since become Hicksite from the fact that there arose theological differences in the society, sufficient to cause division, and resulted in the formation of the Hicksite branch.

"This meeting house was the first built by the society. The subject of this sketch performed his duties so faithfully, and his character had been so exemplary, that Mr. Durfee gave him fifty acres of land when he was twenty-one years old. This land "ras near or on the Durfee estate, and was soon exchanged for land in Farmington. Not being satisfied with this property, he then concluded to go to Michigan, then considered the far West. There being no public thoroughfares at this early period, he was obliged to walk, except perhaps catching an occasional ride. He soon returned to New York, sold his Farmington property and bought fifty acres of land of Phoebe Durfee, which was the first purchase of the homestead property, located two miles north of Palmyra churches.

"The first tree cut on this purchase was in the dooryard on February 18, 1832. It was the beginning of one hundred and five cords of firewood for that Spring. He sold it on the ground for thirty-seven and one-half cents per cord, to a Palmyra buyer. The wood was drawn to the village by Leonard Jerome with a yoke of oxen.

"The latter developed a different rate of speed in his later life as the well-known turfman of New York City. A daughter of this same Leonard Jerome, subsequently married Lord Randolph Churchill, of England.

"The Presbyterian Church in Palmyra bears this same date, 1832. In September, the contractor, Asa Millard, came to Mr. Smith on Saturday and asked him to get out rafters for- the church and do it in a hurry. Mr. Smith was compelled to attend company training on Monday and by Tuesday Mr. Smith had seven scorers and two hewers engaged. In four days the job was done-twenty-two sticks, forly-four feet long, size eight by ten inches. No wonder the roof stands true.

"A log house was soon built in what is now the dooryard of the homestead farm. In May, 1832, Mr. Smith married Melissa Starkweather. Clearing the forest was the order of business.

"At night the grindstone was brought into the log house, the axes were sharpened for the next day. The good wife, the next morning, would take




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her broom, scrub the floor, and clean where the grindstone had stood. Only once, dinner was eaten in the house during the clearing of thirty acres of land, and that on account of a broken ax helve.

"Willard Thayer, Almon Green and Lorenzo Parker helped in the clearing of this land.

"The present farm house was built of stone in 1844. Mr. Smith married for his second wife, Violetta Blaker, in 1877, and moved to Macedon Center, where he resided until his death, which occurred September 17, 1888. He was buried in Palmyra cemetery.

"Many amazing incidents might be related, illustrative of his character. He was a strong advocate of temperance, owing, no doubt, to a mighty vigil he kept when a lad of thirteen. He says: 'Many a jug of liquor I have carried to the field for others to drink, but never a drop passed my lips, but once, when a workman gave me some milk punch. I had taken so much that it required Mother Durfee to sustain me on one side and Phoebe Young on the other, and they kept me walking the floor all night, to prevent a state of existence, generally called dead drunk. I began to stop and go to sleep. 'No, thee must walk,' and every few minutes she would say, 'Guerdon, will thee ever drink any more?' I would reply, 'No, no, only let me sleep.' Mother Durfee always remarking, 'I guess we will walk thee a while longer so thee will not forget it.' (He never did.)"

Mr. Smith was good to the poor. One little deed of kindness, that was appreciated as much, and held in remembrance as long as anything he ever did, was in the Fall of 1849. He had a man husking corn for him, who had a little girl sick with consumption. Mr. Smith inquired after her. The man told him she was getting worse, and if he only had the money he would go to Vienna (now Phelps) and see a doctor, and get some medicine that would help her. Mr. Smith inquired how much he wanted and the man told him it would cost five dollars. "Well," said Mr. Smith, "I will lend thee the money and thee can pay me when thee can." When the man came home at night, he told what Mr. Smith had done. This kind offer made such an impression on the little girl's brother, who was a little younger, to think now, some medicine could be procured to cure his sister, that he never forgot it.

The next day the father went for the medicine, but it failed to do her any good. A little later in the Autumn, when the leaves were falling, she passed away.

Long years after when that little boy had grown to manhood, and Mr. Smith had now become an old man, and had long ago forgotten the circumstances, while he was in the village, he met the brother of this little girl, who stepped up to Mr. Smith and related the circumstance to him and told him he wanted the privilege to thank him for the kindness he had never forgotten. But it had gone entirely out of Mr. Smith's memory. Although so highly appreciated by the boy, Mr. Smith considered it only a neighborly act. He was a man of fine physique and stentorian voice. In religious faith, he was a Hicksite Quaker, his word could be relied upon. He was honored and respected by all who knew him. Mr. Smith had four daughters by his first wife, Harriett, Lucy, Maria and Sarah. Harriett




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married Jeremiah Lyke, who died a good many years ago. Lucy died when a young lady. Maria married John Bailey and moved to Kansas and died a few years later. Sarah married Lewis Taber, who died a few years ago. The widow is now living in Newark.

Leaving the Smith homestead, and passing on down the hill to the north, and nearly at the foot of the hill we come to a road leading to the east, up over a steep hill and down into a deep hollow. At the foot of this eastern slope, we find a brick farm house, erected in the 40's by Ira Greenwood, father of Hon. Marvin T. Greenwood of Newark, N. Y. About 1856 Mr. Greenwood sold this large farm to the late Lorenzo Warner, who married Mary Durfee, daughter of the late Isaac Durfee, who was a son of Lemuel Durfee, as before mentioned, who lived on the Walworth Road, leading from Palmyra. The buying of this large farm of about two hundred acres, put Mr. Warner very heavily in debt, but by being a good farmer, and a good calculator, the old farm in Turkey Hollow (as it was sometimes called, from the fact they raised so many turkeys here) was soon paid for.

After living here a good many years, he came into possession of one hundred acres of land, from the old Durfee farm, built a fine house and barn, where he lived but a few years when he and his wife passed away, leaving one son, Lorenzo Durfee Warner, who has come into the possession of this property. The homestead of four hundred acres, formerly owned by Lemuel and Isaac Durfee passed to their heirs and was sold to others about 1927 or 1928. Mr. Warner is now living on West Jackson Street, Palmyra.

But let us pass on a little farther. Just east of the road, going north, stands a little house, partly on the side hill, which in the 30's was the home of the late Isaac McCumber, who was one of the best carpenters in the country, and who made a specialty of barn building, which was a good business in those days. He brought up a large family in this little house. While working at his trade, he employed several men, going away Monday morning and not returning until Saturday night. In religious faith, he was a Quaker. Long years have passed since this honest, hard working man passed away. The little farm of sixteen acres has changed owners since his death.

Many a barn, throughout the towns of Palmyra and Macedon is standing today, that were built from heavy hewn timbers, and with proper care will stand for many years to come. But the name of Isaac McCumber, who built these buildings is nearly forgotten. Today the auger, chisel and mallet are seldom used. Spikes and nails are used instead of wooden pins as in days of old.

But let us go back to the corner and take a stroll up the north road to the Bela Morgan farm, and look into its history, and in attempting to do this, and being acquainted vvith Mr. Morgan in my younger daYR, I take great pleasure in quoting the following of this worthy pioneer, which was given by Miss Lucy Stoddard before the Palmyra Historical Society a few years ago:

"Bela Morgan was born in Groten, Conn., December 22, 1794. He was the eleventh of twelve children and as the hive of his native place became crowded, Bela Morgan had the enterprise to venture on the hardships of a




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new country in company with Eldridge l:Iavens) who afterward became his brother-in-law, and lived on West Main Street on the site where Hays Ostrander now lives.

"He came to Palmyra in 1818 and purchased a tract of woodland four miles north of Palmyra village. At that time there was no clearing beyond two miles north of this village to the Stephen Durfee farm, later owned by his son-in-law, Elisha Brown. On his new farm he built a log house with a bark roof, and I have.heard him say that in a rainstorm, when his wife was ill, he had many times been obliged to hold an open umbrella over her head to protect her from the storm, and place tin pans on the bed, in various places, to catch the water as it poured down. For a number of years he was very busy clearing his farm, cutting the heavy timbers and burning it on the spot, and his young wife assisted him in lighting the numerous fires and keeping them going. In harvest time, he for a number of years, worked for Mr. Stephen Durfee, his neighbor, two miles away. His wages were fifty cents a day or one bushel of wheat. But as time rolled on, his wheat fields began to enlarge, and the yield was good, but exchanges were made in barter that would not pay the taxes or meet payments on land. There were no railroads or canal. After several years of hard work, with no vacation, he decided to visit Connecticut. There he found help in the person of his mother, who advanced $500 (if my memory serves me right) with which he might build a good, substantial cobblestone house of eight rooms, that now stands intact. Later he added two more rooms, besides well room and wood shed. He met his friends and took on a new lease of life. He made this trip on foot, it taking him six weeks. His faithful wife remained at home, looking after the stock, which consisted of one cow, a pig and watch dog, of which the latter was her sole companion, as it was Winter and neighbors were few, and far between. It would be many days at a time that she saw no person, and but for the faithful dog, she would hardly have been able to endure the lonely waiting.

"He helped to build the first Congregational Church in Marion, and with his wife, was among the early members there; also one of the trustees of the same.

"They went to church on horseback and having a neighbor who had young children, on each alternate Sunday, Aunt would take care of the children, and let her ride behind Uncle Morgan to church. At this date, this was the only horse in the neighborhood, and that a colt. Mr. Morgan was a saddler by trade, and brought his saddle and pillion with him, when he moved from Connecticut. In 1876 he made a substantial gift to the church in Marion of $1,000. He cherished the associations of his youththe love of kindness, the memory and principles of his fathers. He made frequent pilgrimages to the home of his birth, although he found himself amidst a new generation. He delighted in his old age to tread the ancestral acres, to visit the paternal mansion, to muse among the chancels where he garnered the dust of many generations.

"The last twenty years of his life was spent in the village of Palmyra, where he passed peacefully away, April 13, 1883, leaving no heirs."

Now let us return to the site of the old saw mill: On the opposite




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corner, nearly on the site of the new school house, stood a little house in which Oliver Davenport lived for many years. He was no brag, but very dexterious in many kinds of work. He was an expert at sheep shearing, having taken the first prize in several sheep shearing contests.

We will now take a stroll up the Macedon Center road to the old Bills farm. After the death of the Bills, the little farm of fourteen acres was left to a granddaughter, by the name of Caroline Allyn, who subsequently married Charles Allyn, although the same name, but no relation. After living in the old house several years, about 1849, a new house made of brick was built on the site of the old one. The old house was moved across the way, where it has been used ever since for a tool house. When this house was built, a bee was made to draw the brick, which was done in the Winter. Back of the house a sand bed was opened that furnished the sand.

Mr. Allyn added to the little farm until he had a fair-sized farm. In the early 50's he sold the farm to Myron Luddington and moved to Michigan, where he died several years later.

Mr. Luddington lived on this farm several years. After his death the farm passed into the hands of Edwin Brown, son of Elisha Brown, who still owns and lives on the farm.

Passing on west, our first house was built by the late Thomas Chapman, on a part of the Martin Harris farm, which we shall have more to say about as we advance on our journey.

Across the way and on the north side of the road lies the farm once owned by the first wife of Martin Harris, the Mormon. In the 40's this farm was sold to Perry Parker, who had just married the daughter of Aretus Lapham (as before nentioned) and settled on this farm and set out an orchard west of the house.
The orchard is now nearly all disappeared. About 1856 he sold out and moved to Ashtabula, Ohio, where he later died.

Marvin Hill, who had just married Wealthy Wright, who was an adopted daughter of Lemuel Durfee, bought the farm of Mr. Parker. He made a great many improvements, set out a large orchard, enlarged the house and barn and built a tenant house, thus making a fine home.

As time passed on, Mr. Hill became old and unable to carryon the farm, so he sold the same to the late William Bush, who set out another orchard, adjoining on the east.

Mr. Hill, after selling out, went to Clifton Springs to live with a daughter, Mrs. Addie Hill Judd. Mr. Bush, after keeping the farm a short time, sold to Theodore Whitlock. N ow it is owned and occupied by John Coveney. The west line of this farm is now the west line of the town of Palmyra. Therefore, our next farm will be in the town of Macedon, which is the old Deacon Noah Palmer farm. Mr. Palmer was born in Triverton, R. I., August 25, 1759. He was a weaver by trade. His first wife died before he came to the Genesee Country. He married Nancy Simmons for his second wife, who was a very industrious woman. She learned the weaver's trade and became an expert at the loom. Mr. Palmer boasted that she was a natural weaver. Mr. Palmer was over 50 years old when he became animated over the tales of the wDnderful Genesee Country and resolved to follow the trail of other pioneers who had preceded him and




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undaunted by the task before him, he started with his family in 1810, from Triverton, R. I., with no other conveyance than wagon and a yoke of oxen. He purchased his farm of Arthur Harris, who lived in a log house at that time, in the town of Palmyra, now Macedon.

When Mr. Palmer came here in 1810, the two towns combined had but 2,100 inhabitants and 334 families. The products of the loom were 3,300 yards of cloth. Palmyra was bounded on the north by Penfield and Williamson; East by Lyons; South by Farlnington and West by Boles. He at once began to clear away the trees and cultivate the land, and in time built a frame house that is still standing. This new house was painted red, making it a typical New England home.

Mr. Palmer had been a private and corporal in the Rhode Island Militia and had served five years in the war of the Revolution. He drew from March 4, 1831, an annual pension of eighty-four dollars.

In those days it was no uncommon thing to find a person that could neither read nor write and "Aunty Palmer," as she was called, was one of those unfortunates who did not have the advantages that the young people have today. Besides being proficient in the art of weaving, she was a good housekeeper, also a fine cook. Her garden was deco'rated with old-fashioned flowers, and around them the honey bee hummed merrily, gathering sweet nectar from the fairest among them, to store away in their hives, that stood adjacent to the garden, and from these hives each year, a good supply of honey was gathered. She made the old-fashioned sage cheese, that blended so nicely with her mince pies and boiled cider apple sauce.

Her spinning wheel and loom she never forsook. Vigilent industry and strict economy was her motto.

Mr. Palmer had three children by his first wife. Peleg, who was a bachelor, settled on a farm one-balf mile south of the homestead. Benjamin went to Michigan. Patience, the daughter, married a man by the name of Brancroft. By his second wife, there were five sons; Noah settled on a farm that he bought of a man by the name of Medkiff, on the south road, adjoining his half-brother, Peleg on the south. Samuel learned the painter's trade and lived on Washington Street, Palmyra, as before mentioned. Philip rented the old Barnhart Mill, as before mentioned. Fredrick moved to Michigan about 1854. William after receiving a portion of the east end of the old farm, built a house and barn, and after living here a few years, sold out to his brother, Philip, and moved to Michigan, where he died. When Philip went West, his youngest brother, Adoniram, purchased the property.

At Mr. Palmer's death, whieh occurred in 1838, it was customary at that time to divide up the farn1 among the children, each one taking a portion of the farm for their share, leaving the homestead and a portion of the farm for the widow. After the death of the widow, which occurred in the 60's, Adoniram bought out all the heirs and became sole owner of the old farm. At his death, which occurred in the 80's, his daughter, Blanche Palmer, acquired the property and now owns and occupies the farm, thus leaving the old farm in the Palmer family since 1810.

West of the house still stands a remnant of the old orchard, it being




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one of the oldest orchards in town. We look in vain to see the old well sweep, with its box curb. To make this primitive outfit, it required a log, 12 to 15 feet long with a crotch to it. This log was set in the ground two feet or more. This was called the weIl crotch. The sweep was another long pole, 18 or 20 feet long, of which the center of the pole rested in the crotch, held from slipping by a bolt passing through it. This was called the well sweep. Another pole called the well pole was fastened to the outer end of the sweep with the lower end hanging directly over the well on which the bucket was fastened.

Here for a good many years, the "Old Oaken Bucket, the iron bound bucket, the moss covered bucket" swung at the sport of the wind.

For a good many years this home-made device served to draw the water to supply the kitchen, as well as to slake the thirst of many a man and beast. Long years have paRsed since this primitive device has been discarded for something more modern.

Mr. Palmer was a deacon of the Baptist Church of Palmyra and his old home church in Rhode Island for over forty years. The Palmyra church, which they attended, stood across the way from the Whitlock farm on the Walworth Road. To this church they also came from Macedon. But as time passed on, and both villages increased in population, it was thought advisable to divide the Society and did so with an agreement that was satisfactory to all the members. The Macedon people took the old church and moved it to its present site in the village of Macedon. The eastern members came to Palmyra and erected a stone church, of which more will be said later.

If those old pioneers could come back to earth and walk down those carpeted aisles and sit upon the cushioned seats and listen to the thundering tones of the organ, instead of the mello tones of the flute, or look, but in vain, to see the little tin reflectors hanging on the wall in which the candle was placed to light the church! In vain he listens to hear the crackling fire in the glowing fireplace. Although a cold day, yet he feels warm. He is told a heating plant has been installed in the basement where radiant heat warms the whole church building alike. He sees a man pressing a little button on the side of the wall, when all at once a hundred lights appear, more brilliant than the lights of Belshazzer's festival. Indeed, all these would seem wonderful to them. Instead of plodding homeward with an ox team, the trolley car or an enclosed automobile soon conveys them there in time for the noonday meal.

This each succeeding year since 1810, has brought its changes until today. Such changes never once flittered before their imagination.

And strange to say, when Deacon Palmer and wife had passed away, their children, and grandchildren and great grandchildren and great great grandchildren followed along in the same religious belief, and this year a great grandson plays the organ in the Baptist Church of Palmyra, while great grandchildren lend their cultivated voices to the choir.

Thus the Christian influence of those old Christian pioneers left an impression upon their posterity that has lasted for nearly a century and a quarter.




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Owning the same farm and attending and belonging to the same church all these long years is a record, I believe, but few families can show.

We will now say farewell to this old homestead, feeling we have made brighter the pleasant and indellible memories of long ago, and take the south road, which in early day was called "Baptist Street" from the fact that all the people that lived on that street were Baptist.

As we go south, on top of the hill on our left, is the old Wigglesworth farm. The old New England house, for a good many years, was wood-colored, it being built in early day by a man by the name of Burden, who in the early 30's sold the farm to John Wigglesworth, an Englishman, and a bachelor. He was a shoemaker by trade. He did not live on the farm much of the time but went to one of the western states, where he spent the most of his life, leaving his brother, Matthew, who had a large family on the farm of which he gave him the use.

Here Matthew lived the rest of his life, dying in the 70's. This family consisted of ten children, six girls and four boys. Ann, the oldest, married the late Robert Chapman, who lived just north of Walworth Station. She died very suddenly while riding in a wagon. Susan married John Walton who lived on Quaker Road farm, now owned by the widow of his son, John. Margaret died with consumption in the early 50's. Maria was a fine school teacher and married Otis Antisdale as his second wife. She died in the 80's. Mary Jane married Anson Talcott. She died in 1910. Letitia G., the youngest girl, died in 1857, when about eighteen years old. John, the oldest son, died a good many years ago. He received his education in the Palmyra Union School, under Professor Justus W. French. He was a fine penman and later taught penmanship in the same school.

He took up surveying as his profession. His first experience was on a railroad near Binghamton, N. Y. Later he went West and South, when the country was new and the prospects were bright. New railroads were being built, new settlers were moving in and new enterprises constantly springing up. He made this his life work. He died a good many years ago, leaving his family a nice fortune.

His next brother younger, Thomas, also followed the same profession, received his education at the Palmyra lTnion School and finished under Professor Baldwin. His life was also spent in the South and West. He died about 1910, leaving a large estate.

Alembert G. Wigglesworth, the next younger of the boys, after being in business several years, sold out and went to California. He died in the state of Washington about 1920. He married Emma Palmer, daughter of the late Noah Palmer. She is still living.

Albert, the youngest of the family, when the Civil War broke out, enlisted and served his country until the war closed. He then married Ella Griswold, moved to Kentucky and was engaged as conductor on a railroad. After a short time, he was stricken with a fever. and died, leaving a widow and one son, who came back to Palmyra. The son was educated at Cornell University, where he graduated with high honors. After




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leaving the school he went to Cuba and was engaged on a sugar plantation, but this life was too slow for him. He returned to Palmyra, then went to the city of Chicago, where he engaged in the electric business, in which he was very successful and made a fortune.

His mother married the late Cullen Rogers as his second wife. After the death of Mr. Rogers, she sold out to Dr. Clarence C. Nesbitt and went to Chicago to live with her son, dying about 1922.

The Wigglesworth family was made up of church-going people. In those days the lumber wagon was the only conveyance they had to go to church in. It had wooden springs running the whole length on either side of the box, with boards put across for seats, as many as were necessary to accommodate the family. The older people took the middle of the wagon, thereby receiving the full benefit of the springs, but woe unto the one who was unfortunate enough to have a seat over the hind axletree. Yet those were happy days, although rough and uncouth as they may seem to the people of today. Here, neighbor met neighbor on equal terms and reviewed the past which awakened to them that dear delight they so fondly cherished.

Mr. Wigglesworth was a shoemaker by trade. He bought a stock of leather in the Fall and when long evenings came, and on stormy days, the old shoe bench was brought into the kitchen and here in this portable shoe factory, by the glimmering light of a tallow candle, boots and shoes were made for the family.

Mr. Wigglesworth was a small, as well as a very quiet man, and when he was snuggled down in the corner, one would hardly know he was in the room. He was very fond of music and a fine player on the violin, out of which he had a great deal of pleasure, and to hear him play some favorite tune one would not believe it was the same little old quiet man in the corner.

On this farm, a good supply of their sugar was made from their maple trees. Of this large and respectHble family, not one is living, but the old New England house that sheltered them is still standing, looking younger than seventy years ago, by being decorated with a coat of white paint. But we must again say goodbye and jog along on our journey to the old Davenport homestead, lying on the west side of the road. Mr. Davenport came from New England in early day and settled upon this farm. The old wood-colored house is still standing. Here he brought up a large family. Now all have passed away.

Mr. Davenport had one peculiarity, his eyes were not of the same color. One was blue and the other was black. He kept one eye partly closed. He died about 1853. At Mr. Davenport's death, the farm passed to his son, Edward, who spent all his life at the old homestead, dying in the 80's. At his death, the farm passed into the hands of strangers and the Davenport homestead will soon be forgotten.

When Mr. Davenport came to this country, he brought with him a wooden clock, that was hung on a wooden post in the kitchen wall. It had no case to cover its wooden wheels, no glass to cover its face. The weights hung down in plain view, the hands faithfully making their splendid round,




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pointing correctly to each figure on its dusty dial, while each swing of the pendulum accurately ticked the time away.

Generations have come and gone since this old clock first started out on its mission. Long years have passed since the old clock rang out the hour of departed time, and passed into obscurity, trusting to history to reveal the past. But we must pass on to the home of Noah Palmer, son of Deacon Palmer, as before mentioned.

Mr. Palmer married Eliza Davenport, and settled on the farm adjoining on the south of her father's farm, which was the Medkiff farm, as before stated. Here this couple spent their life, dying in the 70's. There was a large family, six girls and one boy. The son and one daughter are the surviving ones of this large family, who now live in California. After the death of Mr. Palmer, the farm passed into the hands of strangers. On the south lived his half-brother, Peleg, who in the 30's bought this farm of John Harner, who sold out and went to Ohio. Mr. Palmer was a bachelor, born and reared in Rhode Island. He did all his farming with an ox-team, keeping up the old New England custom. He never owned a horse. He died in the 50's. Since Mr. Palmer's death the farm has had several owners.

As we journey south we pass where in the 40's, was a large tract of timber, of which a part was owned by the late William Chapman, on the Walworth Road, one-half mile north of the Yellow Mill. In those woods was a fine sand bed, suitable for plastering; also moulding sand was taken from these woods.

Passing on we come to another little wood-colored house on the west side of the road, which has long since been torn down, and but few know that a house was ever there, except a very few of the old inhabitants. In this little house lived John Archer, who came here in the 30's. His wife was a native of New Jersey. The Archer family consisted of five girls and one son, and has fared the fate of their neighbors, for they have all passed away. Mr. Archer was a great hunter and always kept a hound dog, and when he and his dog went out in pursuit of game, they always brought something back. The little farm has been added to an adjoining farm and but few remember this home in the woods.

The late Delos Pratt married Chloe Archer and bought a little fiveacre farm adjoining on the south where he erected a house and barn. Here he lived until his death which occurred in the 80's, leaving a widow and one daughter, Mary Pratt Stetson, wife of George Stetson. She died a few years ago.

Mr. Pratt was a carpenter by trade and a fine workman, employed most of the time in the village. He died in the 80's, his wife dying several years later, at the age of eighty-six years at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Stetson.

Across the way there has been another house built and also another at the north end of the woods, at one time owned and occupied by the late Oliver Davenport.

As we pass along down through the woods, we pass through the Ambrose Hall farm, whose house stood on the corner of Baptist Street




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and Quaker Road. On this corner, at a very early date, Ambrose Hall built a low, old-fashioned New England house, which was perfectly innocent of ever having any paint spread upon it. He also built a barn. The late Israel Mcomber, at one time, in the 40's, lived here; in the early 50's Oliver Jones. Later, about 1856, Lyman Pierce purchased the property and built a mint still north of the house, and raised a good deal of mint. In the 60's, his son, Lewis, bought a part of the farm and on the north road built a house and barn. He died about 1910, being over eighty years old.

In the 60's Mr. Pierce sold the remainder of the farm to the late Gilbert Budd and moved two miles south of Palmyra village on Canandaigua Road. Mr. Budd tore down the old house and barn and built new buildings. He also bought the Peleg Palmer farm, and the stone house farm on the east on Quaker Road.

We have now come to the end of "Baptist Street" and while on our, journey we have looked in vain for kin or kindred of those old pioneers who lived peacefully upon those farms, and occupied those homes. They have all passed away and are nearly forgotten, and the farms have passed into the hands of strangers, and the name of Baptist Street has passed into history.

Those Christian people, faithful to their sacred vow at the altar, undaunted by the chilly blasts of Winter, pressed on through the deep snow drifts that on this road came early and stayed late, arriving at the church in time to listen to the sermon.

The women had a hot brick or an old-fashioned foot warmer in the bottom of the sleigh to keep their feet warm, and a nice quilted winter hood trimmed with down to protect them from the cold. With plenty of clean, bright straw in the bottom of the sleigh and wrapped in the large buffalo robe, they were quite comfortable.

The men were protected by wearing thick woolen mittens upon their hands and a long woolen conlforter that would go three or four times around their neck. Before going to church the family grease dish was brought out and put over the fire to melt the tallow. A little lamp black and beeswax was added which gave the old wooden pegged cowhide boots a gloss after going in the snow, when well rubbed in. This would appear as ridiculous today, to the present generation, as bobbed hair or silk stockings eighty years ago.

Being now at the Quaker Road, why not take a little stroll to the west? Our first house was built in the 60's, by the late Abram Carl, who had now become an old man, sold his farm on Maple Avenue and moved to this new house, which he built, where he spent the remainder of his days near his daughter, Mrs. Budd. Mr. Carl died in the 70's and the place was sold to the late William Parker. At his death, which occurred in the 90's the place passed to George Smith, a son-in-law, who died about 1915, and the place passed into other hands.

Our next farm house on the west was built of stone in the early 40's, by a Mr. Camp, who purchased this farm of Jeremiah Bingham, a native of New Hampshire. In the 50's the late Anson Boyington bought the farm, and in the 60's sold to Edgar Jordan. At his death the farm was sold




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to William A. Chapman. After successfully carrying on this farm for a number of years, about 1900, leaving the farm to his son, Albert, he came into the village, where he died a few years later. Later Albert sold out and moved to Washington Street, where he died. The Chapmans, were fine farmers and always had a fine flock of sheep.

Now let us return to Baptist Street corner, but before going farther, let us go back to 1793, when Nathan Harris and his wife, Rhoda, left Rhode Island and on February 3, 1794, bought six hundred acres of John Swift at a half-dollar per acre. The purchase was bounded west by the present town line, south by the north line of the creek lots, east by William Slocum's purchase, and north by Gideon Durfee, later Lemuel Durfee.

Returning to Baptist Street corner, our first farm on the Harris tract was owned at one time by Ambrose Hall. In the early 40's, it came into the possession of Franklin Lakey, who erected the present stone house as before mentioned. In the late 40's it came into the possession of Fay Purdy, a son-in-law of Hall. He was a Methodist exhorter and of camp meeting fame. This farm he rented to others. Among some of the tenants were John Jones, Vail, John Philips, Avery and others. In the 70's, it was sold to Gilbert Budd, who owned the Hall farm on the west.

After the death of Mr. Budd, John Walton bought the farm, also the one on the west. Later he sold the west farm and retained the stone house farm.

Our next farm on the east: John Russell bought of Harris two hundred acres, which extended east to Isaac Arnold's west line, which was where Division Street now is. The Walton farm came off the west end of the Russell tract, which in the 30's was owned by Barney Allen, who committed suicide in one barn after setting fire to another. The farm then came into the possession of his son-in-law, Samuel Wilber, who after a short time sold to the late Dr. Alexander McIntyre.

In the 60's the late John "Talton purchased the farm and at his death his son John H. Walton took the farm. He later bought the Budd farm, as before mentioned, thus owning two farms. It is now occupied by his widow, Mrs. May Johnson Walton.

Passing on east to the Isaac Arnold tract, which at an early date came into the possession of Abner Lakey, who had a cabinet shop in the Eagle Hotel building, as mentioned before: After Mr. Lakey came into possession of this property he built an old-fashioned low New England hou'se, which was painted a light yellow. Across the lane he had a cider mill where every Fall he made cider. At this old mill, when a boy, I had many a drink of sweet cider from the old pewter tumbler that was waiting on the platform over the tub. Sweet cider to me in those days was a great treat.

He was also a surveyor and in early days he was called upon to do a great deal of that kind of work. Mr. Lakey also purchased that portion of the John Russell tract extending from Division Street west to John Walton's east line and north to the Carl south line. Mr. Lakey was a very prominent man and took a great interest in the general welfare of the community in which he lived. He was twice married. By his first wife




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he had two sons and four daughters. Of the latter were Eunice, who married a minister by the name of Giles; Rowena, who married a man by the name of Knapp; Elizabeth, who married David Lillie. Caroline married David Goldsmith of Port Gibson, who owned a large farm, now owned and successfully conducted by a daughter, Kate. Mention has already been made of the sons. By his second wife there was one daughter, Mrs. Lucy Lakey Bowman, who but recently passed on, being over eighty-eight years old.

After Franklin Lakey sold the stone house farm, about 1849, he bought all that part of his father's farm lying west of Division Street extending west to John Walton's east line.

Almost directly across the road from his father's he built a new house, taking the frame of the old shop on the creek and using the same in the new house, his father keeping the land on the east side of the road. Here he lived the rest of his life.

The farm, at his death, was sold to Absolom Weeks in 1860. The same was sold to Henry Herbert, a native of Maine, who after living here a number of years in the old house, built a new one on the same site of the old one. Here he spent the rest of his days and brought up his family. The farm is still owned by the heirs, except that part which has been sold off to the Garlock Packing Company.

His son Fred, bought nine acres off the farm across the way, lying on Division Street, now covered with cottages, each occupant owning his own home.

Returning to Maple Avenue now: As we pass up over the hill to the north, where neat little cottages now stand, there was in the 50's, a large tobacco field, where Anson Talcott raised tobacco. In the 50's he came from Massachusetts, rented from Franklin Lakey, a tract of land on which to raise tohacco. At that time Mr. Lakey was running a distillery just west of Maple Avenue on Quaker road, aR before mentioned and furnished all the manure he had a mind to draw, thus covering the ground all over with a thick coat. He built large, long sheds in which to hang the tobacco. In this business he made money for several years. When he moved back to Ma.ssachusetts, after the growing of tobacco had ceased, Mr. Lakey sold off lots on which to build houses, thus making Maple A venue a desirable street on which to live. Where the brick house now stands, in the 50's the late George Olivett built a small frame house. A few years later Silas Taber, who then owned a farm one and one-half miles north, sold out and bought the Olivett place, tore down the frame house and built a small brick house on the same site. Here he lived until his death, which occurred in the 70's, when the place was sold to Samuel Lawrence, another retired farmer, who enlarged the house. Mr. Lawrence died in the 80's and the place was sold to a Mr. Fox, who now owns and occupies the same. The house on the south was built in the 70's by the late William Edgerton, who, as well as his neighbor, was a retired farmer, coming from Walworth. At one time he was a supervisor of that town. After coming to Palmyra, he was elected supervisor of his adopted town, which office he filled in a




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creditable manner. He was a man respected by those who knew him. In politics he was a staunch Republican.

We are now at the north line of the Franklin Lakey farm, which was once a part of the John Russell tract, which he bought of Harris, the Fox place being the last one.

As we journey north our next place is the original Nathan Harris homestead, father of Martin Harris, the converted Mormon.

At the time Mr. Harris came here only a trail led to his log cabin. A few years later a road was laid out from the north side of Mud Creek to his log house. The road from Main Street north to the north side of Mud Creek and called Chapel Street to this point, was laid previous to this. Mr. Harris was a noted hunter and fisherman. At one time a single haul of a seine in 1792, across Ganargua Creek, resulted in a catch of eighteen fine salmonr When he was an old man he shot the last wolf killed in this locality. The animal had become known by his depredations, and a company was formed to take him. As Uncle Nathan rode along the road upon his horse, the wolf crossed the road before him, and at once a gallop was taken and, closing the interval between, a shot was fired under full headway and the creature was killed. In the spring time his long fowling piece brought down many a duck when flying over, and bullets known to be his, from the great weight of the ball, were lodged and chopped from the trees by the settlers.

After living in the log house for some time, he built a new frame house, which is still standing, looking very much as when first built, except the north wing, which was added over eighty-five years ago. Northwest from the house on the west side of the road, was a spring in which Harris kept a pet trout. One day a friend possessed of a large red nose, called on a visit. A social glass was followed by a stroll over the farm and ultimately they came to the spring. The friend got down on all fours for a drink of water, while Harris looked on. As the red nose neared the water, out sprang toe trout and seized it, while on the instant an upward toss of the head landed the fish full ten feet to the rear. Harris returned the trout to the spring and informed his bewildered friend that the time was propitious for fishing, and a fine lot were taken that afternoon. The name "Trout Harris," given in eonsequence of this incident, became widely known.

Mr. Harris and family worked diligently iri clearing up his large farm, taking the hardships of pioneer life as they came along. His death occurred while the country was yet new and the hardships of pioneer life were yet many, and it was only the small quarters of the log cabin they had by which to shelter the sick.

After the death of Mr. Harris, George Carpenter, a Quaker, came from Dutchess County, in 1822, and purchased the Harris farm. He had one son, Lot Carpenter, who married a daughter of the late Henry Underhill, who lived one and one-half miles southwest of the Yellow Mills. He died in the 50's.

A daughter of George Carpenter married the late William Walton, a native of England. She was fourteen years old when she came with her




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parents from Dutchess County. She died in 1915 at the age of ninetythree. There were eleven chiidren in George Carpenter's family and all these have long since passed away and are only known by what some fragment of history may reveal.

Across the way from the old I-Iarris homestead can be seen a little old country cemetery in which were buried some of our earliest and most respected citizens, of which more will be said later.

At the death of Mr. Carpenter this large farm was sold to the late Abraham Carl who came from the East in the early 40's. In 1848, he built a tenant house on the south side of his farm. Nicholas Hollenbeck was its first tenant. After a good many years of successful farming, and being somewhat advanced in years he sold the north part of his farm to his son, Henry, keeping fifty acres, including the tenant house, which he enlarged, besides building a barn, thus making this fine farm with choice land. In this new home he lived several years. During this time he was growing old and pondering upon the fact, he sold the farm to the late Alonzo Langdon and moved to a new house he had built on the Quaker road, as before mentioned. Mr. Langdon who bought the farn1, was a son of Benjamin Langdon, the stage driver as before mentioned in the earlier part of this history.

The son Alonzo was a malst"er and distiller by occupation and for several years he was town assessor. At one time he raised considerable tobacco. He died about 1908 and the farm passed on to his son, Hudson Langdon, who died with a cancer about 1915. After his death the farm was sold to a Mr. Martin.

Let us return to the Carl homestead which now was owned by his son, Henry, who in the 50's sold the farm to the late Casper Hollenbeck who came from the original Webb Harwood farm, east of the lower iock on the o1d canal in the town of Macedon. IV1r. Carl bought the Smith farm, now the Lent farm. After a few years he sold out and moved to Michigan. In the 60's Mr. Hollenbeck sold the Carl farm to John S. Wright and moved to Michigan, where he died.

During Mr. Wright's occupancy he sold forty acres to a Mr. Griswold who came from Chenango County, New York. Mr. Griswold built the present house and barn and planted the orchard north of the house. About 1912, Mr. Griswold's son, Charles, bought the remainder of the Wright farm. Previous to this purchase his father had died and Charles came into possession of the same, which later was sold.

Returning to the Harris homestead Charles Griswold after living here a few years, in 1912, sold the farm to Benjamin Tyler a native of Virginiq. In 1921, again the old farm was sold and Mr. Tyler moved into the village.

Many have been the changes since Nathan Harris moved into his log house in the wilderness at the end of the road. History can reveal only a brief sketch of the past. We can only say that this wilderness is now dotted with pleasant homes, fine orchards and fertile fields that lend their charm to the living.

Adjoining this farm on the north is the farm of Martin Harris, son of Nathan Harris. This farm extended as far north as the Macedon Center




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road and was a part of his father's farm. While living he joined the Mormons very much against the wishes of his wife and at one time while engaged in a heated argument with her husband she grabbed up a bundle of his manuscripts and threw them into the fire. He finally sold the farm to Thomas Lakey to raise money to print the Book of Mormons. At this transaction his wife left him and went to live on her own farm which was on the Macedon Center road known as the Marvin Hill farm, now the John Coveney farm, and Martin Harris went West where he again married. After a while he returned with wife No. 2 and after a short time he and wife No. 1 became reconciled to each other and she consented to let Martin come back and live with her and also to bring back wife No. 2 where they all lived together for a time.

When Martin Harris sold his farm to Thomas Lakey to raise money to print the Book of Mormons it had to be paid for in gold.
In 1831 John Graves came from England accompanied by his wife and daughter, Mrs. Christiana Graves Grainger, a widow, who brought with her four children, one of whom, Jane, married William 'Throop and became the mother of George, Mary, Emily and Belle Throop. Emily and Belle have since passed away. Mrs. Grainger also brought with her $3,000 in gold, wrapped in a belt and fastened around her waist. Mr. Graves purchased the farm from Mr. Lakey and paid the $3,000 which was passed on to pay for the printing of the Book of Mormons [sic], which was started in the Fall of 1829 and finished in the Spring of 1830, just one hundred years ago. They paid $3,000 for the work and 5,000 copies were printed. Mr. Egbert B. G. Granden, then publisher of the Wayne Sentinel, took the contract. Mr. John H. Gilbert, as printer, had the chief operative trust of the type setting and proof work of the job.

When Martin Harris first came into possession of the farm, he built a frame house painted white, which was one and one-half stories high. Across the way he built his barn and sheds and covered them with rough hemlock boards. Here John Graves moved with his family. He died leaving, besides his wife, his daughter, Mrs. Christiana Graves Grainger and four children, Grover, James, Jane and Emily.

Mrs. Grainger later married the late William Chapman, a native of England, who owned a large farm north of Union Hill and lived upon it while his brother John Chapman worked the Grainger farm on shares. In 1848 John bought the Frederick Sheffield farm just north of Walworth station now owned by his grandson, William Chapman. In the Spring of 1849 John moved on his new farm and his brother William was to move on the Grainger farm where John had been living.

Just before John moved, the house caught fire and was burned to the ground. Everything was destroyed even to their clothing. William not being dismayed at this calamity, moved his family into the corn crib and immediately began to make preparations for a new house that was to be made of stone. The late Robert Johnson was its builder. The front wall on the outside was faced with lake stone that were drawn by oxen. His son, Thomas, who could not have -been over nine or ten years old, drew a good many of them taking three days to make the round trip. It took




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one day to go and another to return, and one day to gather up the stones. Mr. Chapman had two sons Thomas and William who were born in the old log house. After the death of his wife, which occurred in the 70's, he married Elizabeth Watson, his son William taking the Union Hill farm and Thomas taking the Grainger farm. The father bought the twenty-five acre farm of the William Durfee heirs. rfhere he spent the remainder of his life. The boys were successful farmers. William married Adelia Pierce, daughter of Lyman Pierce, and after living in the log house for a time, built a fine farm house. He planted a large orchard and together with other good crops, became a wealthy farmer.

After retiring from business he left the farm to his sons and moved to California where he died about 1915. William was fond of travel having visited every section of the United States and Canada. He also went to England and later to Palestine. He was always very much interested in the Palmyra fair, often coming from California, arriving here in time for the fair.

His brother Thomas married Jane Throop. While living on the old farm he moved the old rough barns that stood beside the road across the way to their present location. The old house that was burned was a one and a half story white house. After awhile Thomas sold all that part of the farm south of the railroad to Ella wigglesworth, widow of Albert Wigglesworth, as before mentioned. He built a house on that portion north of the railroad. He sold out and went West. Later he returned and bought a little four acre farm on Maple Avenue where he built a house now owned by his heirs. He left three sons: Harry G., William and Carl, and a daughter, Mrs. Leon Cator. Carl passed away several years ago, leaving a wife and one son.

Thomas was also fond of traveling. He went all over the United States and Canada, and made several trips across the continent, finally moving to California, where he died about 1910. Mr. Chapman was a very genial man and thought a good deal of his friends.

Thus the old Martin Harris farm has been divided up and passed into the hands of strangers and the original owners will soon be forgotten.

West Main Street

Let us return to the village for another starting point and follow up West Main Street. Passing the Aldrich farm, at our left back upon the hill stands the beautiful country residence of the late Jackson Downing, who in the 70's sold the Dennis Rogers farm on the Quaker road in the town of Macedon. He came to Palmyra, bought ten acres of land off the west side of the Aidrich farm and erected this elegant house. Here he lived until his death which occurred in the 90's. When this house was built, labor and material were low, and houses of this class were in better demand, but times have changed, labor, material and fuel have advanced so in price. N eat small cottages are fast taking the place of those that are more costly. At Mr. Downing's death this fine residence was put upon the market, and for the reasons above stated no buyer came forward, and finally it was sold for the Palmyra Inn for the accommodations of the passing tourist. The price was $5000, far less than its value.

Passing along we shortly come to the old Downing homestead. This




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old landmark was in the Downing family a good many years. They came here in the 30's and bought this farm, going into debt. After a few years Mr. Downing died leaving two sons, Jackson and Dibble G., and one daughter, Jeruslia, who married the late Daniel Gates as his second wife and moved to Canandaigua, where he died. With good management the widow and two sons went on and paid up the debt.

Dibble Downing kept the homestead. At his death which occurred in the 90's the farm passed to strangers. Dibble married the daughter of the late A. P. Crandall, a prominent and enterprising business man in the village of Palmyra as before mentioned. Jackson married the daughter of the late Mr. Pettitt, a retired farmer. In the 90's Mahlon Kinman owned this farm. Later Peter Briggs was its owner. All of the above names are fast passing from memory.

The little white house across the way was built by the late Darius Davenport who was a blacksmith and came here in the 40's. His little shop stood near the road. As time passed on he became old and decrepit with years and gave up the business. He died in the 80's and the little shop was torn down and the country blacksmith is forgotten. It is now owned and occupied by Charles Wilkinson.

Adjoining this on the west was the old Yellow Mill, built in 1793, an old landmark for many years.

In pioneer days General John Swift whose residence will be pointed out as we advance in our journey, had a woolen mill on this same site where wool was made into rolls for spinning.

Later it was converted into a custom flour and feed mill and operated as such for several years using the old burr stone: In the 30's it came into the possession of E. P. Goddard and for a good many years went by the name of "Goddard's Mill," and it had always been painted yellow, and as time passed on and Mr. Goddard sold out and moved away and was nearly forgotten, it gradually took the nanle of "Yellow Mill" and for more than three fourths of a century it had been known by no other name. At one time in its earlier history it did a large business as a custom flour mill. But the milling business had changed from what it was fifty years ago. The old burr stone had become obsolete and the roller process fast came into use and a good many years ago the old mill was converted into a feed mill. Otherwise but very little change had been made in the old landmark. This old mill during its life time had a good many owners.

On July 18, 1929, the old mill was struck by lightning, and soon burst into flames. Soon the black smoke floating heavenward, told the story of its destruction. The passing of this old landmark seems like losing an old friend, but the old Ganargua that furnished the power to turn the stone that ground the grain in this old mill, still flows on in silent grandeur to the sea, where for ages it has been wrapped in ocean's fond embrace. In 1931 a more compact mill was erected at this corner and will be known also as Yellow Mill. Dewey Gowers is the proprietor. Now we take a lingering look at what remains of the old mill walls and pass on in our journey to the Walworth Road.

Speaking of the Beers farm: As we leave this old landmark and




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journey to the north, on the Wahvorth Road, we shortly come to the Quaker Road and going to the west, after passing the little house on the corner, we come to a large two-story house, in an early day, built, owned and occupied by Abraham Spear, who was a son of Lemuel Spear, one of the first pioneers, as before mentioned. For a short time this house was opened up for a tavern, being the second tavern in the town of Macedon. In the 30's, this large farm of two hundred acres came into the possession of Mr. Beers, who came here in the 30's. In the 40's, A. P. Crandall purchased the farm. After living here several years, he let the farm to the late Ira Clark, who was a good farmer and carried on the farm for several years. Mr. Crandall moved to the village of Palmyra, where he became a very prominent man in village affairs. In the 60's he sold the farm to the late John Rannie, a native of Scotland. In the 80's it passed to his son-in-law, Alexander Grieves, who was also a Scotchman.

In the 90's, Charles Johnson purchased what was left of the original farm, for previous to this a good deal of the north end had been sold off to the late William Kent and Lorenzo Warner. Mr. J:ohnson paid $8,000 for what he bought. In 1924, Mr. Johnson sold the farm to a concrete company, as there was a good deal of gravel suitable for making concrete. For this property he received $20,000 and moved into the village of Palmyra, on Canandaigua Street, where he still resides.

This company also bought the farm on the hill adjoining on the west, in the 50's known as the Knight farm, paying $18,000 for the farm; also in the 50's owned by Mr. Slocum; in the 60's by Hulburt. The old Lemuel Spear farm lies between these two farms. On the south side of the road stands the old Spear homestead. This farm had already been sold to another company.

Returning to the Walworth road: As we pass on north a short distance from the corner, we come to the John Swift farm, which he owned for a time. While living here he built the carding mill as mentioned before.

The house in which he lived and built, although a frame house, was a very cheap affair. Additions and lean-tos had been added and all being so near alike it was hard to tell which was the main building. But the soil was of the best quality.

In the 30's, the late William Chapman bought this property. Here he lived and brought up his family. The mother and daughters were very fond of flowers, and in this large dooryard the flower beds were artistically arranged, with the choicest of flowers, while other portions of the ground were shaded by sturdy oaks and stately elms, making this old pioneer homestead a very attractive place.

Mr. Chapman died in the 60's and the farm passed on to the late Absolom Weeks, who came from New York City. After living here a short time, he sold the farm to James Kent, in the 60's, and in the 70's Mr. Kent moved from his farm south of the Huddle on the Walworth Road. He tore down the old house and built the present brick house on the same site of the old one. On this farm he spent the rest of his days. He died very suddenly in the 80's while at the Palmyra Fair. He fell dead under an oak tree at the entrance of the grounds.




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For awhile his oldest son, Hiram owned and occupied the farm. In the 80's he sold the same to the late Zachariah Van Duzer, who came from Macedon. After living here several years, he let the farm and moved into the village. In 1904 he sold the farm to Theodore Whitlock, who, after living here until 1923, sold the farm to the concrete company, retaining the house across the road and a portion of the flat. For this farm he received $23,000 and he moved on Canandaigua Street, Palmyra.

Speaking of William Chapman, who once owned this farm, which extended south beyond the canal: A t the time the Erie Canal was enlarged in 1857, there stood two small frame houses, just north of the canal, and on the west side of the road, on the Beers farm. When the canal was enlarged, these houses were rented to Irish families, who worked on the canal. Across the way, on the east side of the road, Mr. Chapman had a rail fence. He noticed that the rails were fast disappearing from the old fence, and his son, Hoyt, thought he would investigate the matter. One night he came down, took a rail off the fence, carried it home, bored a small hole in the end, poured in a little powder and plugged it up. Taking the rail back, he placed it on the fence, and went home to await the results. In a day or two he heard that one of the stoves had been blown up. After that no more rails were missing.

Adjoining this farm on the north was the William Kent farm. He was a son of James Kent. This farm he bought in the early 20's of David Finley, a native of Walworth, born on Finley Hill. About 1906 Mr. Kent sold the farm to the New York Central Railroad Company, which they bought for the gravel. He received for this fine farm, $30,000. This sale included the land that came off the Rannie farm, as before mentioned. Thus five of the best farms in the town of Macedon, all adjoining each other, will be ruined for agricultural purposes.

Mr. Kent, after selling the farm, moved in the village on the south end of Cuyler Street. After living here a number of years, he sold out and about 1915 moved to California. He came back and di'ed about 1918.

In early day that tract of land in this neighborhood was called the Oak Openings, by the New Englanders who were used to the rocky soil of the East. It was not very desirable for farming, so they passed on, some going as far north as Walworth. One of the first owners of the William Kent farm was Theodore Rawson; later owned by Ambrose Hall; still later in the 40's, by Fay Purdy and from him it passed to David Finley; then to William Kent.

On this once fine farm the changes have been many. The road has changed its course. The buildings have been torn down and carried away. The fine and fertile fields have been ruined and no longer are fit for agricultural purposes.

In these oak woods the Indians had their hunting ground. While digging, bones of Indians were found on this farm. But we pass. on and find our next farm is the Isaac Durfee farm." He was a son of Lemuel Durfee and grandson of Gideon Durfee, who came from Triverton, R. I., in 1794.




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Mr. Durfee bought a part of the farm about 1820. The farm was bought at two separate times for which he paid from ten to twenty dollars an acre. He spent the remainder of his life on this farm and brought up a large family. He died in 1855, being over 70 years old. The farm was left to his two youngest sons, Isaac and Lemuel, who never married. Mr. Durfee had three wives. After his death, the "boys," as they were called, built the fine brick house, south of the homestead. Nearly all the finishing lumber that went into this house was grown on the old farm, such as oak, black walnut, maple, hickory, white wood, besides many other kinds of a cheaper grade, that was necessary to use in the building.

Before the house was completed, Lemuel died. Isaac went on and completed the house, and after living here a few years, he also died, and the large magnificent house that they expected to live in and enjoy for many years, soon became a tenant house for the stranger who worked the large farm. A few years later the old homestead caught fire and burned to the ground.

After the brick house was built, Lorenzo Warner, who married their sister, Mary, came into possession of one hundred acres off the south end of the old farm, rented the large farm in Turkey Hollow, as mentioned before, and moved to the Durfee farm, where he erected a fine house and barn, just north of the West Shore Railroad, where he spent the rest of his life, leaving this property to Lorenzo Durfee Warner, an only child, who, after living here several years, let the farm and moved on Jackson Street in the village of Palmyra.

After the death of Isaac Durfee, jr., Burton Durfee, son of Stephen Durfee, and grandson of Isaac Durfee, sr., and L. D. Warner, who was also a grandson, bought out the heirs to this property. In 1921 the Burton Durfee heirs and L. D. Warner sold the entire Durfee estate, Mr. Warner retaining the one hundred acres of his father's estate.

Thus nearly all the old farm, after being in the family for over one hundred years, has passed into the hands of strangers, and the name "Durfee Farm" will soon be forgotten.

Our next neighbor on the north was William Capron, * who was also an early settler, and a native of Connecticut, coming to this country when Mud Creek was yet a navigable stream and when the pioneers had to go to Geneva to mill.

He was it fine farmer. His farm once took the first prize for being the best conducted farm in the county. There were three sons and one daughter. Erastus Allyn became a military man and lived in Washington, D. C. George kept the homestead. In the 80's he sold the farm to the New York Central Railroad Company, which they bought for the gravel. For this farm, Mr. Capron received $16,000 and bought a ten-acre farm on Canandaigua Street, south of Palmyra village, where he died in the 80's.

Old Mr. Capron, while stopping over night at a hotel at Seneca Falls, went out upon the porch in the evening and it being dark and there being no guard rail, he stepped off, which resulted in his death. The widow

__________
* William Pitt Capron (c.1785-1846) md. Mariamne Allyn.




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spent the remainder of her life on the farm with her son, George. The daughter married James Gallup, who was a merchant in Palmyra and the other son, Frank, died while yet young.

Including the Lapham farm, adjoining on the west, this makes seven of the finest farms for agricultural purposes in the town of Macedon, that have been ruined for the gravel.

Continuing our journey, we come to the iargest four-track railroad in the world. Here at this crossing, the writer of this sketch, while crossing boy, flagged the first passenger train that passed over the road, of which more will be said later.

Just north of here we come to what was called in ye olden time, "Green's Corners."

In 1802, Captain Ephriam Green, who had been an officer in the War of the Revolution, came from Massachusetts and took up a farm of one hundred acres at this corner. At that time there were but two houses between this farm and Lake Ontario on the north.

He soon built a log house in which he lived for a time. He later built the present old homestead that is still standing near the corner and its first coat of paint was yellow. The flat across the way was a dense black ash swamp. One night a hungry bear came out of this swamp and seized a good sized pig and w'alked triumphantly away, crushing the bones of the poor pig while on his march.

The daughters were Alta and Betsy Ann. The sons were James, Orson and Almon. The latter kept the homestead and made a good nlany substantial improvements on the property. The old yellow house was remodeled with new cornice and brackets and painted white. The old barns were moved across the way and put upon solid walls. The old rough hemlock siding was stripped off and matched siding put on and painted, and many conveniences were added to make this a pleasant place to live. Almon was a colonel in the militia. He was a powerful man, lean and tall, being 6 foot 2 inches in his stocking feet. Almon did not marry until quite late in life. He then married Sarah Archer, daughter of John Arche'r, who lived on Baptist Street, as before mentioned. They had two sons, Almon and Percy. Almon died several years ago. Percy is living in the village and is a bachelor. He was employed at the railroad stations for several years. The grandfather died in 1857 and was buried in the old cemetery across from the Whitlock farm on the Walworth Road. Almon, sr., died in the 70's. He was a kind man, firm in his convictions and adhered to what he thought was right. His wife died a few years later.

My associations with this old farm in my younger days, while working by the month, endears me to this spot. I have slept many nights beneath its roof, and eaten many a meal at their table, both Summer and Winter, when we had salt pork three times a day which was then the substantial food for all farmers.

But when I look back now to see the dilapidated condition of those once fine farm buildings, caused by neglect and the ravages of time, it saddens my heart. Those old maple trees in front of the house, I helped




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to set out over seventy years ago, bringing some of them on my shoulder from the woods. After taking a lingering look at this old homestead, we pass on up the hill only to again recall remembrances of long ago.

Our first farm is that of Paul Sheffield, who came here in early day. At his death the farm came to his son, Frederick. About 1848, John Chapman, a native of England, as before mentioned, bought this farm. He was a natural farmer and made this into a fine farm. Although a fine farmer and a man of good judgment, he could neither read nor write. When young, these advantages he did not have, but nevertheless, he was one of the substantial men of the town. He had two children, Robert and Christina. At his death the farm went to his son Robert, who had two sons, William and John, who came into the possession of the farm after the death of the father. John died several years ago, when William became sole owner of the farm. Several years ago he moved to the village of Palmyra where he now lives. He sold the farm in 1930.

Adjoining this farm on the north in early day, was one owned and occupied by Ransom Steward. Later it came by way of purchase to Jacob Hagaman, a native of New Jersey. In 1848, William Coates, a native of England, who shortly after coming to this country married Christina, daughter of John Chapman, purchased the Hagaman farm and occupied the same until the Spring of 1852, when he sold out to David Bussey and moved to-the F. L. Reeves farm on the Creek Road. In 1858, Thomas Jones Bussey received from his father, forty acres off the south side of the farm and erected the present house and barn, soon after getting married. Twenty acres of the south part of this farm once belonged to the Chapman farm on the south. After living here until about 1912, he sold out and moved to a farm one and one-half miles north of Macedon. Later he moved to Macedon village where he died in 1914.

After the death of David Bussey, Almon Green bought the farm. At his death his son, Almon, jr., came into the possession of the farm. Now it is owned by the heirs of Pliny T. Sexton.

Across the way, at an early date, a Mr. Wood owned and occupied a farm. The house in which he lived was a small wood-colored house. In the 30's he sold to Benjamin Billings, jr., and moved away. For awhile the little house was used for a school house and later it became a tenant house. When in the 80's, Benjamin Billings, 3d., came into the possession of the farm, he tore down the old house and erected a new one on the site. Here he lived until 1924. He has now become somewhat advanced in years and wishing to retire from the hard and busy life of farming, he sold out to Charles Smith, a nephew, and moved into the village of Palmyra.

The orchard on the south, between the Billings and Chapman farms, was once a part of the Billings farm, but was sold to the late Henry R. Durfee.

The farm on the north was in the 30's owned and occupied by John N. Green, who built the present house. In the 40's he sold to Fay Purdy, who in 1850 sold to James Servoss. In 1852 it came into the possession of John Shephard, and in 1853 passed into the hands of Benjamin Billings, jr., who lived here until his death, which occurred on July 2'4, 1889.




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Later it was owned and occupied by a son-in-law, Dayton Smith, and is now owned and occupied by his son, Charles, who still owns the south farm, and is a grandson of Benjamin Billings, jr.

Adjoining on the north is the original Billings homestead.

Benjamin Billings, sr., was born in Preston, Conn., September 13, 1753, a son of William Billings, who came from England and settled in Dorchester, Massachusetts. He was a captain in the Revolutionary War, serving all through and being present at the surrender of General Burgoyne. After the close of the war, he moved to Dutchess County, N. Y., and in 1818 came with two ox teams to the Genesee Country, bringing with them only the things most needed for the future wants of a pioneer. His wife was a very resourceful woman and does not deserve our praise and admiration less. She not only looked after that which belonged to the wardrobe and culinary departments but she looked after the monetary affairs as well that was to pay for the section they might buy. It was a quandary where to put the money. Finally she turned an iron kettle into a safety vault, where in the bottom she carefully laid the money and packed other things around it. The Bible and Prayer Book were not forgotten. Young Night's Thoughts and Shakespeare she also brought and found time to read with all her other multitudinous duties. With the glimmering light of the candle she spent long Winter evenings knitting or preparing warp for the loom. They moved irito a log house in which they lived for a time, when a low frame New England house was built in which he lived until his death.

The hardships and inconveniences of pioneer life were many. Sickness and death were frequent and for want of room and accommodations many times the sick did not receive proper care. Neighbors were kind and tender-hearted and rendered all assistance possible. Yet dea th darkened many a home.

The outfit of a pioneer's cabin was often mostly home made. The broom was made of a birch stick, and called the splint broom. No dustpan was required, for the dirt could be swept into the fireplace. Frequently the milk would have an onion-like taste caused by cows eating leaks when running in the woods. Gourd seed was planted to raise gourds for dippers. All writing was done with goose quills that were gathered and tied into bundles and carefully laid in a little niche near the door, called "goose hole." The door swung on wooden hinges. The latch was made of wood. A string made of leather was fastened to the latch and passed through a hole to the outside, which was called the "latch string." At night the string w.as pulled in, then the do.or was locked against intruders.

The grain at first was threshed with the flail. Later when a farmer built his barn, a stationary thresher was installed. A long shed was attached to the barn and in the center of the shed was a perpendicular post, eight or ten inches through, with each end in a socket so it could turn. Near the top was a large cog wheel, about five feet across, connecting with a tumbling rod just beneath the floor that went to the scaffold over the side floor. In the scaffold floor were long slats about an inch wide, near the thresher, grain and straw coming out together. The straw was raked




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off as it came from the nlachine. The grain dropped upon the floor below. In the perpendicular post in the shed a sweep could be put in, to which the horses were hitched to turn the mill. For a good many years the old cog wheel could be seen around those old barns. Another kind of thresher was used that could be transported from neighbor to neighbor with horsepower and sweep. The grain and straw came out together as from the other machine mentioned.

After the death of Mr. Billings, his son, Benjamin, jr., came into possession of the homestead by buying of the heirs the different parcels of land that had been willed to them as was the custom in those days. He now became sole owner of two farms, owning the Wood farm as mentioned before.

Mr. Billings was a scholarly man as well as a man of refinement and enterprise. He was twice married. His first wife was a daughter of Thomas Glover. For his second wife he married Susan Filmore, a daughter of Luther Filmore of Walworth. By his first wife he had three children and by his second wife, eight. Shortly after he married his second wife, he let his farm and moved to Walworth village, where he kept a genera] store. In 1852 he moved back to the homestead and carried on both farms. In 1854, he bought of John Shephard the farm adjoining on the south and moved into the Shephard house, now having a farm each side of him with dwelling in the center.

At the time Mr. Billings returned to the farm, hay and grain was yet cut with cradle and scythe. He had the first grain drill in town, made in Todelo, 0., in 1846. It had nine tubes, each tube had a separate box for the grain. These boxes had no cover. The amount of grain to sow per acre was gauged by small blocks of wood being placed in the box. There were no phosphate attachments for that kind of fertilizer was yet unknown among the farmers. This drill did fairly good work. On this large farm there was still one thing more to do both indoors and out.

In those days vigilant industry and strict economy was their motto. During haying and harvest it was no uncommon thing to have as many as eighteen to feed at dinner time. All this was accomplished by the women folk and hired girl, besides washing, baking and attending to the dairy. Although this may seem almost unbelievable, yet, however, such was the case.

After the close of the Civil War, a son, Allen Billings, after returning from the army, married and bought the north farm of his father. After living here a few years he sold the farm to Harrison Knapp, father of Judge Clyde W. Knapp, who tore down the old house and erected a new one on the site of the old one and remodeled the barn. After living here several years, he sold out to William Bush, who kept a fine herd of registered Holstein cows. At his death the farm went to his son-in-law, Robert Coveney, who still owns and occupies the farm.

After the death of Mr. Billings, the center farm was purchased by Dayton Smith, who was a son-in-law, and at his death went to his son, Charles, who owns and occupies the same now. He also bought out Benjamin 3d., as before stated.




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The first Zion Episcopal Church in this part of the country was organized in Palmyra, June 23, 1823. The Rev. Rufus Murray was pastor. Mr. Joseph Colt and Benjamjn Billings were unanimously chosen wardens. Benjamin Billings served as 'Yarden until his death, January 13, 1838.

As Benjamin Billings was one of the builders of the first church, so was Benjamin Billings, 2nd., one of the builders of the second church. He was warden for many years, the longest anyone had been in that office at the time of his death, July 24, 1889. He was one of the building committee, together with Rev. J. G. Webster, George W. Cuyler and Charles McLouth. He paid $1,000 towards the erection of the new church.

After the death of Benjamin Billings, sr., the widow went to live with her son, Benjamin, where she had a pleasant and comfortable home the rest of her life. She died at an advanced age, being over ninety years old at the time of her death, which occuITed in the 70's.

The Chapman and Billings families were prominent members of the Palmyra Episcopal Church and took an active part in its early history. In establishing Christian principles by their devotion to God, and of their upright and Christian influence upon the community in which they lived, they have left a rich heritage to the coming generation.

We have now completed our journey on the Walworth Road and have already gone beyond our limit. While on this journey we visited the homes of many pioneers who in their younger days were brought up in the school of industry and taught to listen to the voice of economy, and by adhering to these rules, prosperity was their reward and they were soon able to move from a log house to one of frame that was more modern and convenient. At their death the homestead usually passed to one of the heirs, as was the custom in those days. But as time passed on and generations passed away, some found homes in other parts of the country, while others sought employment that was more suitable to their taste than farming, and the old homestead passed into the hands of strangers, who were unconscious of the past.

Thus kin and kindred have nearly all passed away and the name and deeds of the old pioneer have passed into history.

While on our journey, through imagination, we have heard the hum of the wheel and the vigilant stroke of the loom. We have sat by the fireplace in the log house and enjoyed its evening glow. We have watched the amber smoke as it curled from the stick chimney and floated skyward to be scattered by the winds.

We have also, through imagination, seen the wilderness that was once the home of the wolf and bear, converted into fertile fields and pleasant homes. We have. also seen beautiful farms that were once covered with growing grain and grazing cattle, made desolate by drawing away the gravel to help build railroads and cities. Thus we have retraced our steps But evening now veils the day, so we say farewell to Walworth Road and return to the Yellow Mill.

Our next journey will be up the hill on the south road, and our first farm is a part of the Lemuel Spear tract, who came here in February, 1790,




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and bought six hundred acres at twenty cents an acre. At his death his son, Stephen, came into possession of the old homestead which is on the south side of the Quaker Road, a short distance west of Walworth Road, now in a dilapidated condition. With this homestead, he also had a part of the farm which extended south of the mill, and that portion south of the mill came into the possession of Stephen's son, Luther, about 1854, on which he built a fine brick house and also put up the large barns. After living here a number of years, he sold the same to Newman Backus, who married a daughter of Stephen Spear. After the death of Mr. Backus the farm went to his son, Rufus N. Backus. After staying on the farm several years, he sold out and moved to Syracuse.

This old farm, after being in the family over one hundred years, passed on to strangers, and the name of Spear has passed into history.

A little incident might be told of Mrs. Backus, when a girl. One day she and another girl went to the outside of a piece of woods to pick a few berries. They had not been there long when they saw a large bear a short distance from them. They soon scaled the fence and made a hasty retreat, leaving the bear to ponder over their flight. This was about the last bear seen in this neighborhood.

Leaving the Backus farm and passing on south: Our first farm on the east side of the road with house built in early day and standing back upon the knoll, was owned in the early 40's by Judge Strong, who let the farm and lived in the village. In the 50's, Otis Jones, a native of Massachusetts, bought this farm of two hundred acres and after living here a few years, sold the same to Caleb VanDeuzer, an old-time drover, who sold his farm east of Macedon Center. When he first started to buy sheep and cattle, there was no railroad and the stock had to be driven to an eastern market.

While this farm was yet in his possession, he sold off fifty acres on the south end of the farm to his son, Zachariah, who had recently married a daughter of the late Henry P. Underhill. On this fifty acres he built a house and barn. Now it is owned by John Newman.

In the 60's the rest of the farm was sold to John Shephard, who came from the Huddle on the Walworth Road. He let the farm, which was worked by Charles Chapman, who had married an adopted daughter and niece of Mr. Shephard, who moved into the village of Palmyra. After his death, Mr. Chapman acquired the property, let the farm and moved into the village.

In the late 90's Mr. Chapman, while crossing the railroad at Division Street, was· hit by the cars. Both horses were killed, the wagon broken in pieces and Mr. Chapman was thrown into the air and made unconscious for a long time, finally recovering enough to be around for a few years, when he began to grow worse and died about 1906. The farm was left to his daughter, who afterward sold the farm to James Lynch, and moved to California.

Stafford Road

Let us now wander back to the village. After passing the Aldrich farm we find Stafford Street to be the first road leading south, deriving the name from William Stafford, one of the first settlers on that road, who




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lived about three miles south. The old homestead we will have pointed out to us while on our journey.

I have been unable to find any recorded survey of this road. It might have been agreed upon by the residents living on the road with the further action to have it recorded. Our first farm after leaving the south corporation line of the village is the old Jackway farm. William Jackway, being one of the earliest settlers, when he first came here, worked for General John Swift, who gave him this farm as compensation for his services. The farm extended as far north as Mud Creek. As time passed on, the farm was sold in parcels and as early as in the 40's all the land had been sold that lies north of the Fair Ground. In the 50's Franklin Lakey purchased the remainder of the farm. In the 50's a Mr. See bought a lot near the brook and built a small house. Later he sold to William Dixon, who was a shoemaker and worked in a shop in the village. In 1929 the house was burned.

Mr. Lakey sold a number of acres to the late William Sherman, who at one time was a butcher. He tore down the old house, built a new' house on the site of the old Jackway homestead and built a slaughter house in the rear. In the 70's Charles and Eldridge T. H. Allyn bought out Mr. Sherman; they also purchased of Mr. Lakey his interest in the rest of the farm, except the north end which Amos Sanford and Robert Johnson bought and planted to trees. The Allyn brothers also bought the Dixon place, and after coming into possession of the different fragments of the old Jackway farm, they remodeled and enlarged the house, erected the large barn across the way and made a good many other improvements on the farm and for a while this was a dairy and small fruit farm.

The father and mother lived with them while on the farm. After the death of the old people they sold the farm to Darwin Guile and moved to California, where they became wealthy. Charles died in the 90's and Eldridge died about 1914. The widow of Eldridge is still living. Charles never married. About 1913, Mr. Guile sold the farm to William Dixon and moved into the village on Gates Street, dying in 1925. The old Jackway family have all passed away and the old farm has again been sold.

Adjoining on the south is the old Stephen Hyde farm. He came into the possession of this farm in the 40's. When this farm house was built it was in the midst of a sugar camp. The house was painted a very dark green. The posts on the porch were of rough cedar, the limbs not being cut off close to the body, leaving a little stub on which you could hang your hat if necessary. This was a large farm extending east as far as Canandaigua Road. In the 60's the late Absolom Weeks bought the farm. In the 70's the late John McKuen came into possession of the same by purchase, remodeled and enlarged the house and planted a large orchard that has been bearing a good many years. In the 90's Mr. McKuen moved into the village on Jackson Street, where he spent the remainder of his life, where his daughter, Mary McKuen Perkins now owns. The old farm has passed into the hands of strangers.

Our next farm is the Dixon farm, originally belonging to the Hyde farm. It being a wood lot it was sold to Drake and Chapman. After the timber was cut off, Mr. Dixon, after selling his place to Allyn brothers,




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bought this land and put up a house and barn and lived here until his death, when it went to his son, William. It is now owned by strangers.

Adjoining this farm on the south is the Joseph Smith farm, where Mormonism first originated. In the Autumn of 1816, Joseph Smith, sr., came from Royalton, Vermont, to Palmyra. In this family were nine children, six boys and three girls. Soon after arriving in Palmyra he opened a "cake and beer shop." He continued in this business until 1818, when they moved to this tract of wild land to occupy it as squatters, as there was no one who seemed to be looking after it, and on the west side of the road and north of where the barn stands, he built a log cabin that contained two rooms on the ground floor, with two divisions in the garret. Later an addition was put up that was made of slabs and used for a sleeping room. In this cabin they made their home for a dozen years. Finally Mr. Smith contracted for the land from Lemuel Durfee, who owned the property and to him made a small payment on the same, paying the interest on the balance each year by letting his son, Joseph, work for Mr. Durfee, through harvest.
In those days it was customary to have whiskey, especially through harvest. When the country was new, fever and ague was quite prevalent among the new settlers, and to ward off this malady, nearly every family had a preparation they called No. 6, that was made of red peppers and other things that were powerful.

Early one morning, while yet in bed, Joseph contemplated the coming day was going to be hot, and was fearful they might have fish for dinner as he had always heard that fish would make a man dry. With all this flittering before his imagination, and to ward off the coming danger of a sun stroke, he got out of bed, crept softly down stairs and across the old kitchen into the pantry, but unfortunately he tapped the wrong bottle and instead of getting whiskey, he took a good big swig out of No. 6, which nearly strangled him, and upon finding out his mistake, he rushed outdoors to the well and down went the bucket for water. Mr. Durfee, hearing the rumpus, got out of bed to find out the cause of this tumult, and upon looking out of the window, saw the sainted Joseph strangling and black in the face, trying to drink water out of the old "oaken bucket that hung in the well."

The Smiths occupied this tract until 1829, when the new religion was ushered into existence. Up to this time, but very little had been done to clear up the land. A short time before leaving the farm, they erected a small frame for a house on the same site of the present farm house, using the old house for a barn. The new house was never finished by the Smiths. They got their living by making baskets, birch brooms, maple sugar, maple syrup and hunting, fishing and trapping.

The Smiths took their departure in 1831. More will be said about the Smiths as we advance in our journey and some of the important places connected with the Mormons will be pointed out as we advance.

When the Smith family left the farm, it passed into other hands that were more progressive and prosperous. The forest was cleared away, fields were fenced off, where nature heretofore had its unmolested sway and in its season, golden grain nodded in the wind. The unfinished house




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was soon made into a substantial farm house. A new and convenient barn was erected, an orchard was planted and the trail of the squatter was soon lost.

In the early 50's the late Morgan Robinson came into possession of the farm by purchase. In the 60's the late Avery Chapman, a native of Massachusetts, bought the farm. At his death, his son, William, came into possession of the farm, and through early training he became one of the best farmers in Ontario County. While in the Civil War he contracted rheumatism from which after a time he became unable to carry on the farm any longer and sold out to W. W. Bean, a Mormon elder, who came from Salt Lake City. Mr. Chapman moved into the village where he died a few years later.

Leaving the Mormon farm and passing on to the south, we come to the Dennis farm, where Mr. Dennis lived in the 40's. In the late 50's the late Arnold Powers sold his farm in Farmington and bought the Dennis farm. After his death, which occurred in the 70's, Daniel Baker bought the farm and after living here a few years, sold the same to the late Walter Newbury, a native of West Walworth.

In the 80's it was sold to a Mr. Shipley and later passed into the hands of A. S. Downing, at one time a professor in the Palmyra Union School. Now it is owned and occupied by the George Hack heirs.

As we pass on we see other little farms that have been taken from the old Dennis farm with buildings and orchards complete.

Continuing our journey we come to a road leading off to the east of the Stafford Road. Our first farm on that road is the old Tanner farm. Mr. Tanner came here in the 40's and went into the gardening business very extensively. This farm being warm, sandy land, made a very good place for that business. This farm at that time was a model farm. At his death, which occurred in the 70's, the farm passed into the hands of his son-in-law, the late Milford Galloway. In the 80's the farm was soldto the late Byron Reynolds. At his death the farm passed to his heirs.

Returning to Stafford Street: A short distance from the corner, as we go south, we cross a little stream where in early day[s] near the road, a dam was built across by the late Russell Stoddard, an early settler, for the purpose of operating a sawmill. After the mill was completed a neighbor told Mr. Stoddard that there would not be power enough to run the mill, and he would furnish the first log and give him the lumber if he would saw it. But for want of power the mill was never started.

But, however, in all probability, although unconscious of the fact, at the time the pond was built, yet the Mormons might claim the building of the pond was directed by a higher power, and for a nobler cause than sawing logs, for in this little pond the first Mormon was baptized.

Long years have passed since the dam was built, and the one who built it and the one who was converted to the Mormon faith and baptized in this little body of water have long since passed on. But the little stream is still gliding on, singing the same song and following its winding channel as indays gone by.

Looking at our right as we pass along, we can see the old Russell




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Stoddard homestead. Mr. Stoddard came here in the 20's and on this large farm of two hundred fifty acres lived and brought up his family. He died in the 70's, leaving this large farm to his son, Franklin Stoddard, who after living here several years, moved to the village of Palmyra. He died about 1912 in Syracuse at the home of his daughter, and the farm passed into other hands. It is now owned by James Chapman.

Passing on a little further, at our left, back from the road on a little knoll, was the old William Stafford homestead, until a few years ago when it was destroyed by fire.

Mr. Stafford came here at an early date, and was one of the earliest settlers in the town of Manchester. He was in the War of 1812 and was taken prisoner. One dark night he made his escape by passing the guards, crawling on his hands and knees through a prickly ash bramble and before he had gotten beyond speaking distance he heard the guard call out, "One o'clock and all is well." When daylight came, he found himself covered with mud and blood he had received from the scratches of the prickly ash.

He was also a neighbor of the Smiths and had a good opportunity to know something of the wonderful power Joseph possessed, and he was at one time personally interested in one of Joseph's prophetic visions.
While passing, mention might be made of a little circumstance that transpired between him and Joseph. But before doing this we will go back to a time a little previous to this transaction with Joseph.

In September, 1819, the older Smith and his sons, Alvin and Hiram, in digging a well (of which the location will be pointed out as we advance in our journey) threw up a stone of vitreous though opaque appearance and in form like an infant's foot. This stone was secured by Joseph and turned to account as a revelator of present and future in the role of fortune telling. Small amounts were received from the credulous, and thus the imposter was encouraged to enlarge his field by asserting a vision of gold and silver, buried in iron chests in the vicinity. The stone was finally placed in his hat to shade its marvelous brightness when its services were required. Persisting in his apparitions, there were those who in the Spring of 1820 contributed to defray the expense of digging for the buried treasure.

At midnight dupe's laborers and himself, with lanterns, repaired to the hillside east of the Smith house, where following mystic ceremony, digging began in enjoined silence. Two hours elapsed when just as the money box was about to be unearthed, someone spoke and the treasure vanished. This was the explanation of the failure, and to this they all agreed.

But Joseph had another vision, assuming to see where vast treasures lay entombed. Joseph asserted that a "black sheep" was necessary as an offering upon the ground before the work of digging could begin. As various stories have been told about the sacrificing of the sheep, perhaps the following might be interesting to some. I therefore quote from Wallace W. Miner, what Mr. Stafford told him, and as I have been personally and intimately acquainted with Mr. Miner for over eighty years, I believe this to be true:




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"The location for this sacrifice was on the second hill east of the Smith house, at that time on the Chase farm. This hill was called by the neighbors, 'Old Sharp' and by divine command he was to go to the barnyard of William Stafford and take from the fold a black sheep without leave or license, and lead it to the place "There it was to be sacrificed. That night the parties met at the appointed hour, at the chosen spot with lanterns. Joseph traced a circle within which the wether was placed and his throat cut; the blood saturated the ground. Silently and solemnly, but with vigor, excavation began.

"Three hours of futile labor had passed, when it was discovered that the older Smith, assisted by one of his boys, had taken the sheep quietly away, thus giving the Smith family a stock of fat mutton for family use.

"The next day Joseph went to Mr. Stafford and said to him: 'I suppose you have missed your black wether. God owns all the cattle and sheep on the hills and commanded me to come and take that wether. I am willing to pay for the sheep. I have no money, but I will work for you until you are satisfied you are paid.'

"Joseph could make good sap buckets and Mr. Stafford needed a few more so he told Joseph he could make him sap buckets enough to pay for the sheep, which he did to the satisfaction of Mr. Stafford.

"In regard to the sheep, who knows but what there was an understanding between Joseph and his father, that he was to come for the carcass after Joseph had sacrificed the blood of the sheep, and if Joseph paid for the sheep, why was not the sheep his, and who had a better right than he and his family? This matter we will leave for philosophers to decide upon."

The above was told to Mr. Miner by Mr. Stafford. The hill on which the sheep was sacrificed, being further east and lying on Canandaigua Street, will be pointed out as we advance in our journey.

William Stafford had three sons. Dr. John Stafford lived in Manchester, where he practiced for several years. In the 70's he moved to Rochester, where he died several years later, being ninety-nine years and six months old at the time of his death.
Barton * lived on a part of the old farm. He peddled fish a good many years. He procured his fish from Lake Ontario, making a trip once a week through the summertime. In those days the fish were caught at night. In the morning he would buy his load and start out on his journey, selling fish that were fresh instead of cold storage, as is now the custom. "Bart," as he was called, had a peculiar way of blowing his horn that no one else could imitate. This horn he delighted in blowing for everyone knew who was coming. His brother, Nelson, occupied the northern part of the farm and lived in a little house north of the brook. This house was burned in the 70's, while Frederick Shoales was living there.

The late Melvin Galloway owned and occupied this little farm at one time. Later he moved to the Tanner farm as before mentioned. Many incidents relating to the old pioneers who came here in early days and by hard labor cleared up those old farms, might be mentioned.

_________ * Barton Stafford (1808-1878) married Abigail Butts. They evidently resided briefly in Auburn, Geauga Co., Ohio. Their son Israel was born in 1848 in Geauga Co. (probably at Auburn) By 1850 the family had returned to Manchester. See his 1833 affidavit obtained by D.P. Hurlbut.




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Neither do the women, who toiled to make a home, deserve our admiration less.

The Stafford family have all passed away and the old farm has passed into th'e hands of strangers. Now, no one bearing the name of Stafford, from whence it derived its name, is living on the street, and in a few years the Stafford farm will be forgotten only by little sketches of history.

Adjoining this farm on the south is the Orin Reed farm. Mr. Reed was another old pioneer in the town of Manchester. This farm he bought from the Connecticut loan. He spent the rest of his life on this farm. He died in the 80's. His only daughter came into possession of the farm after her father's death, and made her home here as long as she lived. The farm is now owned and occupied by the heirs of R. Beach Chapman.

Across the way was the Walker farm, another old pioneer. Later the farm passed into the hands of Thomas Fish, another old pioneer, who sold the stone house farm on the south and bought the Walker farm. Later Mr. Fish sold to Norris Sawyer and at his death, which occurred in the 80's the farm passed to his son, Charles. In 1924 it was sold to Thomas Hall.

David Payne, previous to his coming to the stone house farm that he bought of Mr. Fish, who built the house, came from a farm adjoining on the west, which later came into the possession of his son, Collins Payne, who later sold the farm, and moved to Palmyra where he died on May 23, 1931.

The stone house farm is still held by the heirs of David Payne. On the road opposite the stone house, running southeast, lay the Shubil Smith farm, which was another large tract that Mr. Smith came into possession of in early days.

At the time the stone house was built the road leading to the south had not yet been laid out, and a log road curved up near the stone house. But after a while a new road had been projected leading directly south. The log road was straightened and the new road opened up, very much to the displeasure of Shubil Smith, * for it took the travel off his road, but by this change it opened up a direct road to Manchester.

Speaking of Shubil Smith, who lived on the cross road, and who was one of the earliest settlers: At one time he owned all the land on that street as far south as the corner. Here he lived the rest of his life and brought up his family. After living in a log house for several years, he built one of frame that is still standing. After his death the farm was divided up into several pieces.

We have now come to the end of our journey on Stafford Street. We have gone a little farther than we intended to go when we first started out on our journey, but the pioneers were so linked together it was hard to break off.

The typical old New England pioneers of Stafford Street have all passed away, and nearly all the farms are occupied by strangers, who know not the ways and customs of old.

The hot, twisted fried cakes no longer appease our palate. The homemade sage cheese has had its day. The old cider barrel has no fountain,

_________ * In about 1786 Shubael Smith's sister Nancy Ann (1768-1849) married William Jaques/Jackway (1749-1848), thus establishing a family link between these two New York old pioneers.






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and the bright embers that once glowed upon the hearth have turned black, and no one is left who can relate the past.

Canandaigua Road

Now we come to Canandaigua Street, and perhaps it would be better understood if I should repeat something that has already been said. As time passed on Indian trails and blazed trails were many times opened up as public highways.

As Canandaigua Street and Fayette Street are closely connected, in the early history of these roads, perhaps it would not be out of place to give a better description of these roads, so that if people of fifty years hence should happen to read it, they could more fully understand it. Although mention has already been made of the Indian trail down Fayette Street and as there has been some changes that have passed into history around the corner of Fayette and Jackson Streets, it will be necessary to mention a little of what has previously been said. Before Palmyra had yet become a village, there was an Indian trail leading down through the woods where Fayette Street now is, passing over Crandall's Hill and on to the western slope, and at the foot of Bear Hill, taking a southerly course and keeping about forty rods east of the present Canandaigua Road, until it arrives at the Jacob Kommer farm, then taking a southwesterly course to Miner's. Corner, thence on to an Indian reservation in Manchester, near Dr. John H. Pratt's house, thence on to Canandaigua. About the year 1797, a blazed trail was made, following the old trail from Canandaigua to Palmyra, up Fayette Street, as mentioned before, thus making Fayette Street the oldest road leading from Palmyra to Canandaigua.

Over this primitive road came the pioneer, oxcart and postboy. As Fayette Street became wider, and had not been properly laid out, houses were built which probably accounts for this street being so narrow. Soon after Palmyra had become an incorporated village, in 1828, a survey of Fayette Street was made, commencing on the south side of Main Street, west of Gaine Robinson's lot, for the east line of said highway, and running from the south line of Main Street, south and parallel with Gaine Robinson's west line, until it intersects with Chapel Street, laid out on the south side of the mill pond. Said street was to be sixty-two and one-half links wide and called Fayette Street, named after General Lafayette, who came to visit this country and landed in New York, August 15, 1825. Fayette Street extended south to the north line of. Cyrus Foster's farm.

In 1829, Jackson Street came legally into existence, beginning on the east line of Fayette Street, running west. For some reason the survey of 1829 was not satisfactory, so on December 27, 1830, a new survey was made, which began on the west side of Fayette Street, near the brick house of William J. Van Dorn (William J. Van Dorn's house later became Solomon Carter's house, as mentioned before) and ran west one hundred and ninety-four rods and seven links to Stafford Street.

That same year came the extension of Jackson Street, commencing on the east line of Fayette Street, and the west line of Samuel Jennings' lot, later Solomon Crowell's lot, as mentioned before, running east six chains and twenty-nine links.

On Jackson Street, no buildings had been erected, up to 1833, when




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west of Canandaigua Street, William Cuyler and Joel McCullen built a fence across the road, so that on May 30, 1833, the trustees served notice that the street should be opened.

Six jurors found that no damage had been done by these individuals, who had closed the road, when the same was ordered reopened, within three days. This street was named Jackson Street, in honor of Andrew Jackson, who was elected president in 1828. "To the victor belong the spoils."

There was some doubt as to the legality of the survey of 1828, of Fayette Street and in 1836, a new survey was made, commencing on the south side of Main Street, running south to the south line of the corporation of said village.

Speaking of Chapel Street, which was twenty-six and seven-sixteenths rods south of Main Street, on the south side of the brook: Now this street extended as far east as the corner of Throop and Vienna Streets, as mentioned before, and the part of Chapel Street which was discontinued, is that which lies east of Fayette Street, to the west end of Catherine Street.

The east end of Jackson Street was also rescinded. In 1869 Sexton Street was laid out, beginning at the east end and north side of Jackson Street, extending north until it intersects Catherine Street, thus connecting the two streets, and to be fifty feet wide, and on account of the hill, and not being properly worked, for nearly the next sixty years it amounted to but little more than a lane. But when the automobile came, there was a demand all over the country for more and better roads for the safety and convenience of the public.

Palmyra village was no exception to the rule, and in 1925, Edward Hurlbut, the Village Street Commissioner, advised improving Sexton Street, thus making it another main thoroughfare, through the village. This did not at that time, meet the approval of the trustees, and in 1928 this project was more favorably considered, and by a vote of the majority of the trustees it was carried that the street should be improved. Work was to be immediately commenced, but looking over the situation, it was decided to move the street further west, which made a more level and convenient road. Catherine Street, Sexton Street and East Jackson Street passed into history. Now this improvement has made another main thoroughfare, running through the village, and henceforth, the new street is to be known and designated as Prospect Drive.

Speaking of the blazed trail: That part north of Cyrus Foster's south line, that for several years had served for a main thoroughfare, between Palmyra and Canandaigua, was to be abandoned, and a new road was to be laid out but not surveyed.

It began at a point on the old trail, near the south line of the Cyrus Foster farm, taking a northwesterly course, down through the woods, until it came to the Knight place on the present Canandaigua road; later the McLouth place; thence going north to Main Street, where the present Canandaigua Road now is.

This now became the main thoroughfare, for several years, between




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Canandaigua and Palmyra, until 1828, when by virtue of an act, commissioners were appointed to layout or alter a road between Palmyra, in the county of Wayne, and Manchester, in the county of Ontario. A survey was made, beginning on the south side of Main Street, in said Palmyra, sixty-two links west of James White's brick store.

This store stood on the northwest corner of the Episcopal church yard, close to the road on both streets, and was the first brick building in Palmyra.

Running south in its present course, to the village of Manchester, this road was to be five rods wide and to be known and designated as a state road.

In this survey the road was somewhat straightened at the south end of Palmyra and at the north end of Manchester, and by the commissioners it was further determined and concluded that all that part of the old road between the point of intersection (the Knight place, later the McLouth place) with the new road, north on the Cyrus Foster farm, in the town of Palmyra, and south on the Widow Chase farm, in the town of Manchester, be discontinued when the new road was opened and well worked.

The Widow Chase * farm, in the town of Manchester, included the Tim Sanders farm and the little sixteen-acre farm on the south, near Miner's Corners, on the west side of the road; also the log house and seven acres of land on the east side of the road.


In 1850 William P. Nottingham, who had just acquired the Kommer farm, also purchased the seven acres on the east side of the road to add to his farm, when this road was laid out.

Let it be remembered there were only four houses on this street, which were the Truman Hemingway house, now the Dr. R. A. Reeves house; the Solomon Hathaway house, now Charles Sawyer's house; the Cyrus Foster house, now the Rumrill place; and Mrs. Chase's log house in the town of Manchester, which was the only house south of Cyrus Foster's. On the old trail that was to be abandoned, there were five log houses, one on the Merritt farm; Bryant) the shoemaker, on the Caffyn farm; the Sanders family on the Sanders farm; and the Chase family as before mentioned; and Whipple on the Kommer farm.

These old pioneers have all long since passed away, and the amber smoke no longer curls from the stick chimney, floating skyward, through the branches of the forest trees; the bright embers upon the hearth have all turned black, the ashes have turned white, and I know of no one except myself, who can, today, point out their habitation.

Now let us return to Main Street: James and Orin White sold out the brick store to Israel Richardson and Samuel Allen. After a while they closed out the business. Israel Richardson went to Buffalo, where he studied law, and Samuel Allen started the first stage route between Palmyra and Canandaigua, for the purpose of carrying mail and passengers. This enterprise was continued until around the early eighties, when for the need of patronage it was abandoned and the mail was carried to Canandaigua via Rochester.

At the time this new road was opened up, it was full of stumps, stones

_________ * Phebe Mason Chase (1772-1854), the widow of Clark Chase (1770-1821) -- not Melissa Saunders Chase (1800-1861), wife of Willard Chase (1798-1871); nor Selema LeMunyon Chase (1811-1887), wife of Able Durfee Chase (1814-1900) -- see William E. Reed's 1902 book The Descendants of Thomas Durfee of Portsmouth, R.I.




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and mud holes, but as time passed on and new settlers came in, it graduallly improved.

It has ever been before the minds of the American people to improve on different ways of transportation, not only by rail and waterway, but also by improving the highways through the country.

As early as the first year of President Monroe's administration, the question of internal improvements began to be agitated. As civilization and progress were steadily advancing to the West, it became necessary to devise suitable means for transportation of various products to reach the markets.

In one instance, however, a bill was passed by Congress, appropriating the rneans necessary for the construction of a national road across the Alleghanies, from Cumberland to Wheeling.

For many years appropriations were made for the road. It was continued to Illinois, but at length it was turned over to the states in which it lies. But as civilization spread over the country, necessity called for more and better roads.

As early as 1848 a stock company was formed called the Palmyra and Canandaigua Plank Road Company.

An act was passed November 24, 1847, granting and allowing said company the right to take and use the public highway for the purpose of building a plank road from Palmyra to Canandaigua, according to the provisions of the law.

Robert Chapin, of Chapinsville, was president of the company. Sufficient money was raised by selling stock to start the work and in 1849 the road was completed. Grades were cut down, the road bed leveled and sides were lined up, making a double wheelway about twenty feet wide, one of planks and one of dirt. The plank made the wheelway for loaded teams on the east side, while the dirt wheelway was on the west side. Planks about 3x6 inches and eighteen feet long were laid down, running lengthwise of the road, Spiked to these were plank about ten feet long, running crosswise of the road. A slant of about two or three inches was given to carry off the water to the outside of the road.

A good many dissatisfied ones objected to this slant in the road, claiming the weave on the axle and the strain on the wheel would be injurious to the wagon. The one having the heavy load claimed the plank, while the one with the light load took the dirt road. When this road was first built it was considered very fine, compared to the primitive roads at that time, and many an old dobbin, right fresh from the pasture and chuck full of grass was compelled to test his speed and "two forty on the plank" was always expected.

But after a while, when some of the planks had become worn and had to be replaced with new ones, the road was not so smooth to ride upon as when first built.

The road commenced at Main Street. The first toll gate was on the west side, nearly opposite Charlotte A venue. It was large enough to accommodate the family who lived here to collect the toll. The roof of the house extended over the wheelway, thus protecting the one collecting




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the toll, and the traveler from the stornl while the fee was being collected.

Later, when Foster Street was put through, people would take that street to shun the gate and save the toll. So in order to catch the traffic, the gate was moved to the south side of the Caffyn farm on the west side of the road (the original farm). There was another gate just north of Manchester village. At the end of each mile was a milestone on which was marked the number of miles. The first one was just north of the Welch house on the west side of the road, another just south of Miner's Corners, a third just south of the old Armington homestead, the fourth just north of the old Lyke homestead, near where once stood the blacksmith shop and the fifth was near the Manchester schoolhouse.

The toll was one cent per mile on horseback; one cent per mile for single horse and carriage; two cents per mile for a double team, and four cents per mile for a four-horse team.

This enterprise was not very pleasing to the inhabitants living on the road, for they had to pay toll every time they went to town. The toll gate south of Manchester village was on the Danforth Boothe farm. He owned the land on both sides of the gate and not being very well pleased with the road, made a private road around the gate to avoid paying toll.

One day when his cup of woe was full of bitterness, he put one hundred bushels of wheat on a narrow-tired wagon, hitched four horses to the wagon and started for Palmyra. The weight was too much, for a good many of the old planks succumbed to the heavy burden. But this was a balm to the sufferer.

It was claimed by some that the charter for the road was illegally obtained as it required the consent of two-thirds of the property owners on the road, whereas only three or four signed it. The others names were put on without being consulted before it went before the legislature.

The road did not prove to be a paying investment for the price of lumber and labor kept constantly increasing and to replace the worn out planks was too expensive. But they curtailed the expense somewhat. Instead of replacing with plank they drew on gravel and covered the old plank which made quite a good road. This plan they followed for several years, until the expiration of the charter, when the road was thrown up and reverted back to the original road district. This was in the 70's and so it remained until 1914 when it was turned over to the state and is again a state road, and today the old toll gate stands as a dwelling, opposite Miner's Corners.

At the southeast corner of Jackson and Canandaigua Streets, there stands an old colonial house wit.h large and imposing columns, such as no other house in the village can boast. It was erected nearly seventy-five years ago by Philo Robinson, who was a carpenter with a shop on the west end of the Rowley lumber yard. This shop was burned a good many years ago. Mr. Robinson, after living here a few years, sold to the late Amos C. Sanford, the merchant, and moved to Michigan.

Mr. Sanford lived here the remainder of his life and brought up a family, dying about 1902. At his death the property passe9 into the hands of Pliny T. Sexton. Now it is owned by Mrs. Louisa Riggs Smith. During




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Mr. Sanford's occupancy, he moved the little cottage that is in the same yard on the south, from the northeast corner of Cuyler and Jackson Streets. This was called the Peter Huycke house. Between these two houses Alvin LaRue has recently erected a fine home.

Our next place on the south was once the home of the late Col. James Stoddard, son of Silas Stoddard, who was born in Groten, Conn., December 7,1759, and was one of Palmyra's earliest settlers. He settled on the farm just north of the Deacon Noah Palmer farm and died in Palmyra, July 3, 1850. In early life he was a soldier. He migrated to Western New York in 1801, landing first at Sodus. He settled in Palmyra on the farm as before mentioned, about three miles north of the aqueduct. He lived to be ninety-one years old. His son James, was born in Groten, Conn., January 31, 1784. When James grew to manhood he married and settled on the farm adjoining his father's on the north, later known as the Duane Galloway farm. In the 40's he sold the farm and came to Palmyra village, and erected the house above mentioned. In this wood-colored house he lived until his death, which occurred October 3, 1870.

After the death of James Stoddard the place was sold to Amos C. Sanford and Daniel Harmon. The latter, being a carpenter, remodeled the old house from a plain square house of two stories to one more modern. The property has changed owners several times. In 1921, Marvin Tyler bought the property and changed it to a fine looking double house, now owned and occupied by Charles Johnson, coming from the Rannie farm on the Quaker Road. The next house is owned and occupied by Frank Buck.

The next old-time place on the south was the Solomon Hathaway place. Mr. Hathaway was one of the earliest settlers in Palmyra. He was a sadler by trade and one of the first tavern keepers, as mentioned before. He lived on this little farm many years. He died a good many years ago. The widow lived on the place several years with her son, Henry. Later her son, Charles, who was a bachelor, came into possession of the property and with him she lived and spent the rest of her life, dying at the age of one hundred four years. Her son, Charles, died about 1904. Then all this valuable property went to his niece, Mrs. Charlotte Jenner Birdsall and has nearly all been sold for building purposes.

Charlotte Avenue and Hathaway Place are the names of two of the Streets that have been opened up on this property.

Little cottages and palatial homes now dot the fields where once grain grew and cattle grazed.

Two little churches have been erected near the brook. The Church of God on the west side of the road and on the north side of the brook and the tidy little Dutch Reformed Church on the east side of the road and south of the brook. The old farm barn has been torn down and the timbers went into the Dutch Reformed Church sheds. The old Hathaway homestead is still standing, looking very much as it did a century ago, save a wider cornice and a bay window on the south. Now it is owned by Charles Sawyer.

The primeval maple that now stands in front of the house where it




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has stood for more than one hundred years, displaying its beauty to the admiration of all that pass that. way, is now fast going to decay and in a few years more the old maple tree will have departed forever. Our next house south of the brook once stood where the Presbyterian parsonage now stands. The rest of the houses on the Hathaway land on this street are all new and built since 1905.

Adjoining the Hathaway farm on the south is the old Cyrus Foster farm. Cyrus Foster came here at a very early date and settled on this farm, where he spent the rest of his Hfe. At his death the farm was left to his two sons, Burton and William Foster. Burton kept the old home stead on the west side of the road and William built a new house across the way in the 40's.

He was a public spirited man. He laid out Foster Street through the old farm and built nearly all the houses on East Foster Street, and set out those fine maple trees that have grown to be fine shade trees.

The farm was all carried on together. He brought up a large family, which have all passed away. He had a daughter, who married the late Lyman Hurlburt. To the daughter, he gave a lot on the southeast corner of Foster and Canandaigua Streets, on which Mr. Hurlburt erected a fine house. The daughter died in the 80's. Mr. Hurlburt married for his second wife, Anne Luppold. Mr. Hurlburt died in the 90's. The widow' is still living on the place. After the death of Mr. Foster, the homestead came into the hands of his son, Wayland, who made a good many improvements on the property. After a short time he sold out and moved away and the old homestead passed into the hands of strangers.

The original homestead in which Burton lived was a typical old New England wood-colored house, with nine-foot posts and large chimney, passing down through the center of the house, containing three or four fireplaces; also a brick oven. The front door was in the center of the house, shaded by a large bittersweet. The old open woodshed ran off to the south. Although there were 110 shade trees in the yard, yet it was a pleasant spot, such as would command the admiration of all and make a pleasant and lasting impression upon the young. But all this has changed, the large shade trees in the yard and by the side of the road have been set out since the death of Mr. Foster. After his death, the late Daniel Harmon, who was a carpenter, bought the place, changed it from a typical New England homestead to a more up-to-date house.

Now the old New England house has lost its charm forever. History can make but feeble attempt to describe this old place. Language cannot portray the bright halo around this old place of long ago. Burton and William were both staunch Democrats and good neighbors.

Among some of the different owners were Amos Sanford, Abraham VanLare, Mahlon H. Blaker, C. P. O'Conner, N. W. Class and now Charles Rumrill.

A lot was sold off on the south side of the Rumrill place and here John E. Redwood has erected a fine residence.

In the late 70's, West Foster Street was laid out. The old Foster farm has been sold in pieces and parcels, until there is no Foster farm.




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The little cottage adjoining the Hurlburt property was built by a Mr. Matthews, who died shortly after moving into the new house. Now it is owned and occupied by Hart Pierce.

In the early 70's the Rev. R. P. Lamb (a Baptist minister) came from Macedon, bought an acre of land of Mr. Foster and built a house and barn. Being in poor health when he came here, he did not live long to enjoy his new home. At his death the place was sold to George Winston, a native of Chenango County, later owned by the late Thomas Macauley. Now it is owned and occupied by George Conant, a son-in-law.

Passing a little further along, we can see in an open field, a nice, little cottage built in 1924 by Roy Pullman.

In the 70's, the late Robert Johnson purchased from Burton Foster, ten acres of land adjoining the Foster homestead on the south. On this land Mr. Johnson built a fine house that stands back from the road, almost lost in depths of green from trees and shrubbery that he planted when he built the house.

Mr. Johnson had long been engaged in the growing of small fruits in company with the late Alexander Purdy and after selling out his interest to Mr. Purdy and immediately after coming here, again went into the same business which he carried on for several years. In the 80's he sold out to E. W. Atwater and bought a farm near Shortsville, where his remaining days were spent. This place has changed hands several times since. Prof. Augustus Downing, at one time Principal of the Palmyra Union School, owned the place. He also at the same time was engaged in raising full-blooded Holstein cattle.

In 1888 F. Bristol Spier same here from Lyons and bought the property from Mr. Downing. He died after living here a few months and the widow sold the place to Czar Dunning. Here Mr. Dunning lived with his family for eight years when he died. Title to the property has since been held by the heirs. The widow died several years later.

The next farm south is also of ten acres and" was once a part of the Foster farm and was purchased in the 40's by a Mr. Treet, who built the house and barn and after living here several years finally sold Ollt to a Mr. Pettitt, whose daughter, Olive G. Pettitt subsequently married Jackson A. Downing. Mr. Treet moved to N evv Orleans. Mr. Pettitt, in the 60's, sold to Mr. Candee and went to live with his son-in-law, Mr. Downing, who had just bought the Dennis Rogers farm, near the old lower lock in the town of Macedon. After several years he sold the farm to a Mr. Lane, who came from Ontario, and bought the ten acres from the Aldrich farm as before mentioned.

Long before this date the older Downings and their wives had passed away. Mr. Candee's death occurred soon after buying this place and in 1863, the widow sold the same to the late George Capron and bought the Babbitt place on Cuyler Street. She died about 1920.

George Capron was a son of William Capron, who lived south of Walworth Station, as before mentioned. Mr. Capron lived here the rest of his life. He died in the 80's. After his death the little farm passed to the Crookston family by way of purchase.
Mr. Crookston had died in Grand




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Rapids, Mich., in 1888, and in 1890 the widow came here to live. She was the daughter of the late Edward Smith as before mentioned, in the early part of this history. The place is still occupied by the Crookston family.

In the 50's, the late Thomas Knight sold his farm on the hill on the Quaker Road about one-half mile west of the Walworth Road and bought the little six-acre farm adjoining the Capron place, on the south, and if living today, judging from the way he kept this little place in the past, he would receive our admiration and praise for keeping his place in perfect order.

An adopted daughter lived in the Knight family and tenderly cared for them as long as they lived. At their death the place was left to the adopted daughter, who lived here the remainder of her life. She passed away in the 90's and the place passed into the hands of strangers. Now the Knight family is nearly forgotten. The little place is owned and occupied by Anthony Molner who is fast bringing it back to its former tidiness.

At this point in the highway, the original trail bore off to the east, as mentioned before.

At the time this change was made, Cyrus Foster, who owned the land, very bitterly opposed it, and his old shot gun was brought out to defend his rights, but with few explanations, satisfactory to Mr. Foster, the matter was settled and the present road was laid out.

Leaving the old trail and following the present or new road our first house, as we go south, was once the home of Peter McInery, and Annie, his wife. It was in 1847 when Peter Mclnery went from Ireland to Scotland where he became engaged in working on a railroad.

While in Scotland he met Annie, who subsequently became his wife. Peter was handsome. His rosy cheeks and hair curling in ringlets over his head, together with his polite and pleasing manner, won the affections of Annie, which later ripened into love, and on May 15, 1849, they were married, very much to the displeasure of her people, for Annie had the distinction of noble birth, being a descendant of Mary, Queen of Scots, while Peter was of lower rank. But Annie was willing to give up her station in life for the one she loved, and to avoid humiliating her people further, she and Peter decided to embark for the United States and make this country their future home.

After landing in New York, they came to Canandaigua, where he found work on the new plank road, leading from Canandaigua to Palmyra. After staying here for awhile, they came to Palmyra and in 1857 bought of the late Warren Schofield, a little three-acre farm adjoining the Knight place on the south.

Mr. Schofield had already made plans to build a house. The cellar was dug, and the, cellar wall was already built when Mr. McInery came into possession of the place. He at once started to carry out the plans Mr. Schofield had made and the little eottage was soon built and on this little farm that they fairly worshipped and so carefully guarded, this quaint old couple lived peacefully and contented and happy, the rest of their days. They made but few friends and to them they were ever loyal.

They were both lovers of flowers and of those, chose only the fairest




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among them, of sweetest fragrance and brightest hue, to adorn their little dooryard.

Besides carrying on his little place, he found employment in caring for flower gardens in the village. Mrs. McInery died in the 80's and Peter a few years later.

Thus have passed away the two old lovers, who were faithful to their sacred vows at the altar. At the death of Mr. McInery the little place passed into the hands of strangers, and the name of Peter and Annie will soon be forgotten.

Passing on to the next place we find a wire fence, built over seventy years ago by a Mr. Burbank, who came from Marion. He also remodeled the house. In the late 60's Abel Chase bought the property and lived here a good many years, dying in the 90's. Mr. Chase raised a large family. Lewis Chase, living on Fayette Street, is the only one left of that large family now living.

Mr. Chase was a good carpenter and for a good many years was employed by Pliny T. Sexton. The black walnut counter that was in the First National Bank was some of his handwork and bore silent testimony of his ability. After becoming an old man, he sold his home to John Sutphen and went to Geneva to live with a daughter, where he died soon after, but his character and reputation as a neighbor and citizen still lives. John Sutphen was a son of Deacon Sutphen, who lived on the Ridge Road, west of Ontario Corners. He was also a brother of Dr. Morris Sutphen, who lived in Walworth in the early 50's.

John Sutphen, in his younger days, worked on a farm Summers, and taught school Winters. After attending school at Lima, N. Y., where was located a popular academy of learning, he came to Palmyra and read law in a local lawyer's office and later was admitted to the bar. But farm life to him had its fascinations, that later he chose to pursue. He married Caroline Booth of Shortsville and purchased a farm south of the Yellow Mill, where he lived a good many years. He finally became old and wishing to retire, sold out and bought the Chase farm of six acres. After a few years his wife died. He passed away a few years later and the place passed into other hands.

Over eighty years ago, Henry Van Dyne lived on the place adjoining on the south of the Sutphen place. This place has had a good many different owners, among some of whom were Palmer Lamb, George Stoutenberg and Andrew Luppold, who was ninety years old when he died.

To the next place, Hiram Van Duzen came in the 50's, from Marion, living on this place until the 80's when he sold out and bought a small farm south of Newark, where he died several years ago. His son, Richard, is still living on the farm. He has been assessor of the town of Arcadia for thirty years. Since Mr. VanDuzen's occupancy the place has changed hands a good many times. Mr. VanDuzen sold to the late Charles Williams, who was a veteran of the Civil War. Later I)aniel O'Brien bought the little eight-acre farm and remodeled and enlarged the house. Now it is owned by other parties.

We now come to the Stephen Hyde property, where in the 50's stood




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a tenant house. In the 60's the late Richard Welch purchased the tenant house and two acres of land, tore down the old house and built a new house on the same site. Later he bought four acres more adjoining on the south of the late Martin Butterfield estate. The property is now owned by Justin :B. Perkins; also the orchard on the south which was planted in the 70's by the late John McKeuon. For a number of years this orchard has had the reputation of producing large crops of very fine apples.

The orchard lot and the Welch place, at one time, belonged to the Hyde farm and originally belonged to the Swift tract, including the O'Brien place; also the Stoutenberg place.

Away back in the 30's, in the orchard west of the little run on the knoll, stood a house and cooper shop.

Returning to the Knight place and on the opposite side of the road: In the 70's the late Amos Sanford bought from William Foster the land extending as far south as the north line of the original Swift tract. On this land he built two houses. The third house or the one farthest south, was the old Swift house which was moved here, of which more will be said as we pass along.

Adjoining on the south, in the 30's, the late Benjamin Sanders, who was a carpenter, bought fourteen acres from the Swift tract and built a house and barn. In the early 50's he sold out and moved to Michigan. Since that time there have been several owners. Among some of them were a Mr. Van Duzen in the 50's and Bennett, who sold out in the 70's and moved to Illinois. Mrs. R'omer Williams, being its purchaser, fashioned this little house into a very attractive cottage. She lived with her son, Charles, until her death, which occurred in the 90's. She left an only son, who still lives on the place.

It was in the 40's, when Lorenzo Sanders, a brother of Benjamin, bought sixteen acres adjoining on the south. He was a carpenter, and built a house and barn. Later he put up a cider mill and in the early 50's soldout and went to Michigan.

Mr. Acker, who purchased'the property, lived here several years and each fall ran the cider mill. After his death, which occurred in the 60's, the place was sold to Mrs. Powell, who lived here until the 70's and then sold to a Mrs. Root, a native of Jefferson County, the price being $6,250. In the 80's, Richard Welch, who lived across the way, bought the same place for $21,000. This goes to show a little how property had depreciated in those few years. Mr. Welch remodeled the house. Re died in the 90's and the place passed into the hands of strangers. These two little farms as well as the' two farms on the south once belonged to the Swift tract.

John Hardenburg ·and his sister, Rachael, came here in the 30's and bought fifty acres adjoining on the south. At that time the house and barn stood near the road.

This I quote, the late Abel Chase once said to me: "I went to school in that old chamber. John Swift's daughter taught the school."

Not much like the school houses of today. Just imagine sitting on a hard bench, under a low roof on a hot day, trying to study a lesson. The Hardenburgs lived here until 1874, when both brother and sister became




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old and decrepit with years. John died and the farm was sold to the late Henry Riggs and Rachael went to live with a brother in Pennsylvania, where she died a few years later.

At the time Mr. Riggs purchased the property, thirty acres had been sold off on the south a few years before. When Mr. Riggs bought the property he tore down the old barn, sold the old house which was moved to its present location as before mentioned, and built the present house and barn, now standing back from the road on the hill. Here he lived several years. In the 90's he sold the place to Charles Clark and it has since passed into other hands. Now it it owned and occupied by William Merrick.

About 1866 the late Andrew Sherman bought thirty acres off the south side of the Hardenburg farm and built a house and barn. About 1870 he traded this property with the writer of this history for a farm near the Huddle on the Walworth Road, and while in possession of the writer the house was remodeled and enlarged. The barn was moved and put upon a w'all and also enlarged. New siding was put on and it was painted and an addition was made to the barn. In 1895 it was sold to Frederick Caffyn, who still owns the farm.

Off the southwest of the Caffyn farm, while yet owned by the Swifts, seven acres were sold to a Mr. Metts, and two houses were built. Mr. Metts lived in one and Mr. McComb lived in the other. Later this land was bought back by the Hardenburgs and the old houses were torn down. But very few remember of a house ever being here. In passing I would say that the old road, as before mentioned, was about forty rods east of the Caffyn house, where a log house once stood. A shoemaker by the name of Bryant once lived there. Another old log house once stood on this road, northeast of the Riggs house. Across the road from the Caffyn house, back on the knoll in the Perkins orchard, once stood a house and cooper shop. More may be said about this road as we pass along on our journey.

Adjoining the Perkins orchard on the south, Charles Hathaway planted an orchard about the same time. The Hathaway land at one time extended as far south as the county line.

Away back in early day, Solomon Hathaway, one of the early pioneers, came here for wood and as no one seemed to claim the land, after a while, he put a fence around it and paid taxes on it, and as some of the land was wet and stony, at that time was not considered very valuable.

Enoch Sanders came to Palmyra from Litchfield, Conn., and worked for John Swift. After the latter sold his business, Mr. Sanders received as compensation for his services, one hundred acres of land of which he took possession immediately after leaving Mr. Swift's employ. He next journeyed to Connecticut, where he married Abigal Holmes, returning with his wife to his property here, passing through Albany while they were tolling the bell for Washington's funeral.

They settled in a log house which they had built near the old road, about fifty rods east of the present house, which stands on a five-acre lot that he bought of Solomon Hathaway on the west side of the new road, for the land on the east side of the new road was too low for building purposes.




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In the 70's all the Hathaway land south of the orchard was bought by the Sanders heirs.

At the time Mr. Sanders came into possession of this property, he found several negro families occupying a part of the land. They were supposed to be slaves who had escaped from bondage and were seeking liberty in this locality. Mr. Sanders received fourteen quit claim deeds for this property, not however, until he had made some bargain satisfactory to the negro occupants.

Their children were, Lorenzo and Benjamin, who went to Michigan; Orson, who died in 1825; Orlando, who kept the homestead, born in 1803; Melissa, who married Willard Chase, a carpenter; Alice, who married James Seeley, a cabinet maker; their two sons, Orson and Andrew, who were cabinet makers; one daughter, Julia, who was the first organist in the Presbyterian Church.

When Mr. Sanders came to this country, the farming tools were decidedly very primitive. The plow he brought with him was made of wrought iron. They were called the "Bullplow." When the point became dull it was taken to the blacksmith to be sharpened. Oxen instead ·of horses were used.

At the death of Mr. Sanders, which occurred in 1825, his wife dying in 1857, Orlando came into possession of the homestead. He married Belinda White in 1828. They had four sons, Alphonzo, Alcander, Septimeous and Orson.

Alphonzo went to Reading, Mich. Alcander went to Camden, Mich. Orson, the youngest son, took the homestead. Orlando bought the old Chase farm on the south and gave it to his son, Septimeous, as mentioned before. Their home was a typical New England home. The old house is still standing, with its old fashioned open wood shed. The kitchen was large. Mrs. Sanders made good use of the wheel and loom. A good supply of sage cheese was always on hand for the table.

The four sons grew up to be strong, healthy men, and all loved to hunt. Their guns, when not in use, hung upon the kitchen wall, all ready to send a message to some wily hawk that was after the chickens. They always kept a hound dog that was well trained for hunting coon. In this sport they were well skilled. They made good use of the oil, their meat and their skins, the latter of which they used to tan and made them into fine, soft robes, and in those days used as a substitute for a buffalo robe. In those days you eould not go to the store and buy a factory made whip. They were all home-made. They made their own whipstocks, braided their own lashes out of woodchuck skins that they had tanned. They raised their own apple trees from seeds they had saved and planted and when old enough were grafted to some favorite kind; made their own sleds and baskets which displayed good workmanship.

One day while out hunting they came across a bee tree. They marked the place and later in the season removed a portion of the hollow stump containing the bees and honey. From this colony, in a short time, they had several swarms of bees that found a lodging place in a home-made hive.




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Tea and coffee were practically unknown to them for none of the boys drank either. But the home-made juice from the home-grown apples was a favorite on their bill of fare. The little yellow mug with some fancy picture on the side was always at their plate at meal time. It ser'ved as container for cider or water, the former coming from the home-made press.

Septimeous, or "Tim" as he was called and better known, was fond of jokes and lost no good opportunity to play one. One day a representative of a telephone company came along in a fine carriage, driving a pair of sprightly horses, for the purpose of securing a privilege of setting a line of poles in front of Tim's property on the highway. He thought by taking a bottle of whiskey along, Tim would soon become an easy mark and he could secure the privilege with greater ease. Shortly after making known his mission, he introduced the little container and invited Tim to sample it. To this he very cheerfully consented and pronounced it good. Tim also told the man that he had in the cellar a product that was homemade which he considered a very good quality and if agreeable to the visitor he would appreciate his opinion of the beverage. To this the visitor kindly consented. Accordingly a liberal supply was brought from the cellar and after partaking of the home-made several times the telephone magnate had forgotten his mission and imagined the gate posts had been moved nearer together and it was with difficulty he could drive between them in going to the road.

Orson and Septimeous never married. Both sons lived at home with their parents. Each canied on his own work separately. Septimeous, after coming into possession of his farm, which was about 1849, did a good deal of his own threshing with a flail. This was his Winter's job. At that time he did all his farming with oxen and later used horses.

In December, 1869, the mother went to fill a lamp, when her clothing caught fire in some way and she was so badly burned that she lived but a few hours. She was a smart and intelligent woman who read the papers and was well informed. She always kept up the old custom of spinning and weaving.

Following her death, the father and sons kept bachelor's hall for a time. In a few years the father died. Orson died in the 90's and on October 23, 1901, Septimeous joined the majority.

Thus this New England family, who had always clung to the ways and customs of old, have passed away. At their death the old farm that had been in the family for over a hundred years was sold.

Fredrick Caffyn, for an addition to his farm, bought all that part lying east of the road, while Jacob Crookston bought that on the west side of the road; also the farm owned by Septimeous adjoining on the south. In a few years the old farm lines as well as the Sanders family will be forgotten.

As we pass on south we come to the concrete post that marks the line between the towns of Palmyra and Manchester; also the county line of Wayne and Ontario counties.






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Looking to the southwest we can plainly see "Old Sharp," the hill on which Joseph Smith sacrificed the sheep, as before mentioned. After Joseph had found the golden plates on Mormon Hill, Thum [sic - Thummim?] Moroni, his guardian angel, told him to go east of the house and dig a cave. There he would nleet him and reveal to him the hieroglyphics on the golden plates, and following the command he commenced digging on the east side of "Old Sharp." After digging about twenty feet Thum Moroni informed him it was not holy ground. From here he went to the next hill east, on the west side of Canandaigua Road, where he again commenced digging. After he had dug about twenty feet he was again told he was not yet on holy ground.

He then repaired to the east side of Miner's Hill, which was at that time covered with forest, and after digging twenty feet it was made known to him that this was the accepted spot and to dig twenty feet more, making nearly forty feet.

After the cave had been dug a door was put up at the opening and fastened, and every evening, just at twilight, for the next three months he visited the cave, always accompanied by two or more, but always entering the cave alone.

For several years this cave remained practically intact. After it had commenced to fall in, Wallace W. Miner, a grandson of Amos Miner, the owner of the hill at that time, partly restored the old cave. The grandson, who is now over eighty six years of age, owns and occupies the farm, but no trace of the old Joe Smith cave can be found.

"Old Sharp" was just across the town line going south, located on the Chase farm. Mr. Chase was one of the early settlers. As mentioned before, his log house was about thirty rods south of the town and county line and on the east side of the road or new highway.

The well that supplied the family with water was dug by the Smiths shortly after they came here. This was the well from which the peep-stone came, as mentioned before.

This well was kept open until the 80's when it was filled up. Here on this farm lived the parents of Durfee, Willard, Abel, Asa, Sally, Edwin, Parley and Mason Chase. The last three of those mentioned went to Michigan and died there. The rest of the family lived in this vicinity and were all first-class carpenters, except Durfee, who was a doctor. After living in the old log house several years, a new farm house and barn was built further south and across the road from the Taber house, now the Kommer house.

After the death of Mr. Chase the farm was sold to a Mr. Morse, an old-time shoemaker. In the 40's the late Franklin Lakey bought the farm and in 1846 he sold it to a Mr. Richmond and around 1849 he sold out to Orlando Sanders and went West.

After the death of Septimeous Sanders, as mentioned before, it came into the hands of Jacob Crookston, and a few years later the Chase house and barn were burned and never rebuilt.

Thus has passed away the Chase family. Of that large family there is none bearing the name of Chase left except Lewis, a son of Abel, and a




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grandson by the name of Charles, Lewis living on Fayette Street and Charles on Charlotte A venue.

The farm across the way from the Chase farm was owned in 1825 by a Mr. Whipple, who lived in a log house just east of the barn on a little knoll, not far from the old road, as before mentioned. This farm at that time included a part of the Miner farm on the south. In 1833 Mr. Whipple sold the farm to Franklin B. Taber, whose daughter married Lorenzo Sanders, who bought from Mr. Taber twenty acres on the south side of the farm, now a part of the lVIiner farm. On this land he built a house and barn, of which the latter has been much changed.

Mr. Taber moved out of the log house into a stone house which he built on the same site as the present house. After Mr. Taber's death the farm went to his son Franklin, who about 1851 sold the farm to the late William P. Nottingham, who at the same time bought of Mr. Sanders that part of the Chase farm lying on the east side of the new road, where the old Chase log house stood as mentioned before. The land was of a flatiron shape containing about seven acres. Now the rest of the old Chase farm is all on the west side of the. road.

Josiah Nottingham, son of William P. Nottingham, carried on the farm and the father kept the hotel in the village.

This family that was once so prominent in the affairs of the community has all passed away. Mrs. Nottingham, widow of Josiah, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John Herbert on Divif',ion Street on April 22, 1926, at the age of ninety-six.

In the early 60's Mr. Notting'ham sold the farm to Elder W. Mudge, a Baptist minister, living in Palmyra from 1856 to 1862. A few years later Mr. Mudge sold to Ephriam Mellen and in 1875 Mr. Mellen sold to Cicero M. Hutchins the fifty-five acres and moved to Illinois where he died a few years later.

Mr. Hutchins had been a professor in the Palmyra Union School for several years. Beforel coming on the farm he tore down a good stone house and built the present house on the same site. The late George C. Williams was the builder of this house.

After living here several years his wife died and Mr. Hutchins sold the farm to Jacob Kommer and came into the village to live with his son Francis, "There he died a few years later.

Speaking of the old road: In early days roads were often formed by following the most beaten path. Log houses were put up on these trails and in a short time they developed into a sort of highway. But as the country became cleared up and framed houses began to be built, a good many of these primitive roads were straightened. Such was the case of this old road, which started in at the Knight place and bore off to the southeast, taking a circular form, coming out and joining the main highway near Miner's Corner.

As soon as the new road was opened up, new frame houses began to be built and in a short time this strip of new road was thickly settled and the rough, winding old trail that was dotted with log houses to afford shelter to the oid pioneer has long since passed from memory, for there




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is no one living that remembers this old trail, and but very few that ever heard of such a road.

From the Knight place to Miner's corners all the houses on this new road have been built since 1828.

We now leave the old road for others to ponder over and resume our journey.

After leaving the Taber farm we come to Miner's Corners. Amos Miner was born in Massachusetts in 1779. He was an enlisted soldier in the War of 1812. He was retained in Albany by the government and assigned to taking soldiers from Albany to Lewiston.

At one time, when on his return trip, he met Archy McKnutt, who was traveling the same way. Mr. McKnutt was also employed by the government in carrying army supplies from Albany to Buffalo. He drove a four-horse team. Mr. Miner's horse had become saddle sore and Mr. McKnutt invited him to get in and ride with him and he hitched his horse on the hind end of the wagon. When they arrived at Albany, they parted.

When the war closed, Mr. Miner went to Gorham, Ontario County, N. Y., where he engaged in farming, and Mr. McKnutt embarked in the teaming business, carrying merchandise from Albany to Buffalo with his four-horse team. He continued in this business until the Erie Canal went through, which ruined his business. He then began teaming from Canandaigua to Pultneyville. Not finding this to be. very remunerative, in a short time this enterprise he finally abandoned and settled upon farming for his life work. He bought a hundred acre farm east of the Armington school house.

After awhile, Mr. Miner sold his property in Gorham and in 1833 came to Palmyra, where he engaged in the grocery business on the southwest corner of Canal and Market Streets and bought a house and lot on Fayette Street, known as the Miller brick house.

Long years had passed since Mr. Miner had left the army and the ride with Mr. McKnutt was nearly forgotten. One day Mr. Miner had occasion to go into the country for some grain. He went to Mr. McKnutt's and after talking for awhile, they finally recognized each other.

After being in the grocery business for some time, he finally traded his house and lot on Fayette Street with Lorenzo Sanders, for the fifty acre farm just east of Miner's Corners on Canandaigua Road. He still retained the store which was aftenvard burned on Sunday, February 7, 1847. The farm that he bought joined the lVlcKnutt farm on the south. Mr. Miner had one son, Chauncey, born August 5, 1818. When a young man he enlisted in the state infantry, later transferred to Lieutenant for three years, was General Guard for the 37th New York Infantry. He was instructed by a man who was in Napoleon's army, and who was with Napoleon at Waterloo.

Chauncey, after coming to the farm with his father, married Sally, oldest daughter of Archy McKnutt, both families living in the same house, each family separate from the other. The old people always used the oldfashioned fireplace for heat and cooking and never owned a stove.

Here is a singular coincidence: Mr. Miner and Mr. McKnutt meeting




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in Buffalo as strangers, riding together as far as Albany, parting and never expecting to see each other again.

Later these two men took up farming for their vocation. After awhile Mr. Miner sold out and moved to Palmyra and went into the grocery business, then turned his attention once more to farming, and bought a farm adjoining Mr. McKnutt's on the south, as mentioned before. Mr. Miner's son, Chauncey, married the daughter of the stranger that Mr. Miner rode with from Buffalo to Albany.

After the death of Amos, Chauncey came into possession of the property. He died several years later, leaving two sons, Wallace W. and Arthur. The latter went to Rochester where he was mail carrier until about 1925, when he retired on a pension and moved to Union Hill, where he passed away May 9, 1931.

Previous to Chauncey's death, a daughter, Minerva, and a son, Bruce, died in the 70's. In the 70's Wallace married a daughter of the late Beal Hammond of Clifton Springs. After a few years his wife died and he came back to the old farm.

For his second wife he married Margaret Cavanaugh, a teacher, who possessed a fine education, spending some time in Germany, where she perfected herself for the work as a teacher. Upon her return she taught for a number of years, ranking among the first of her profession. Later she married Mr. Miner and occupied the Miner homestead. Her death occurred a few years later from a cancer, and since then Mr. Miner has continued to occupy the old homestead, he being the only one living in the neighborhood whose relations with the earlier families have continued for the last eighty-five years. He remembers Martin Harris, the Mormon, coming to his house and staying over night and has had a good opportunity to know a good deal about the Mormons.

Here for many years this old man, now eighty-six years old, lived alone, doing his own cooking and with no other companion but his faithful dog to bear him company. All his early life was spent on this old farm. Although the house is old and dilapidated, to him it has a charm no other place can fill, and the fond remembrances of the past he loves to cherish. Here in the summer time, when the sun has kissed the hills good night, and evening veils the day, the cricket and the katydid sing their evening song as in days gone by, the wasp and the bumblebee vie with one another for the supremacy of the knot hole in the side of the house where they can enter to make their home.

Here in his solitude, while he ponders over the past, a passing cloud may cast a sad gloom over a moment of pleasure and open a wound he does not wish to heal or a sadness he does not want to forget. I, too, have a kindly feeling toward this old house, for I have slept many a night beneath its roof in my boyhood days. I have sat by the old fireplace and enjoyed its evening glow, watching the bright embers on the back log, and the smoke winding its way up the chimney to join the starry October night, while I listened attentively to their stories of the early pioneer days. These and many more are the indelible remembrances of long ago that cluster around the little old house on the knoll.




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In the month of March, about 1926, Wallace W. Miner went out to the barn to look after some sheep, and while there he was stricken and fel1 down and laid there for five or six hours, until the man who came to do chores, with the help of a neighbor, carried him into the house. His brother in Union Hill was notified and came and took him to his home and cared for him until 1929 when he longed to go back to the home of his childhood, where to him the birds sing sweeter, the sun shines brighter, for these charms of his youth, that cluster around the old home, never forsake him. Now we will say goodbye and return to the main road.

Retracing our steps a little to the north and on the west side of the road stands an old house upon the hill, which originally belonged to the Chase farm and was built by one of the Chase sons, where in the 40's lived a man by the name of Price, whose daughter married Franklin Taber, jr., This little sixteen-acre farm, as mentioned before, has had a good many owners since Mr. Price lived here. Among some of them were Gordon, Pierce, Cornwell and Reynolds, staying only a few years at a time. Adjoinil1g this on the south and nearly opposite Miner's Corner, stands the old toll gate. When the plank road was built this house stood nearly opposite Charlotte Avenue in the village. But when Foster Street was laid out and opened up to the public in order to catch the traffic that turned down Foster Street to avoid paying toll, it was moved to the south end of the Caffyn farm. Here it remained until the company gave up their charter. The toll gate was sold to Jay Patridge, who moved it to its present location, and it has since been owned by different ones.

The next place on the south is the Benjamin Patridge farm. This tract of fifty acres he bought of his brother, Daniel, in 1840. This farm also included the six-acre farm on the north which was later sold off. Mr. Daniel Patridge moved into a log house that stood about twenty rods west on the knoll. His brother Benjamin built the present house.

Benjamin Patridge brought up his family on this farm. He died in the 50's. His widow lived here until her death which occurred in the 70's. At her death her son, Jay, bought the farm. He died in the late 90's and the farm passed into the hands of strangers.

At this point on Canandaigua Road we are just two miles from Main Street, Palmyra. We have been gradually climbing higher and higher as we advanced on our journey until we come to the Patridge farm when we arrive at the summit, and if we continue our journey south we will be descending until we arrive at the four corners in Manchester. This condition of grade, south of our village, has often been emphasized when the subject of a reasonable water supply from some of the springs lying a little to the southeast has been discussed.

Passing on, our next farm was in the 30's, the William McKnutt farm of eighty acres, lying on both sides of the road. The old log house in which he lived, stood back on the knoll on the west side of the road about fifty rods. In the late 40's he sold his farm to his cousin, Archy McKnutt and moved to Michigan. The old house was soon torn down and I believe the writer of this sketch is the only one living who can mark the spot where the log house stood.




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After this land came into Archy's possession, he divided it among his four daughters, Mary and Fannie taking what was on the west side of the road, and Sally and Eleanor on the east side. Mary sold hers to F. E. Hooker, who built the house on the west and Fannie built one on her part on the west side.

Adjoining this farm on the south was the LaMunion farm. In the 40's the old log house was still standing and in 1845 occupied by Riley Pendle, a son-in-law.

In the early 50's, Mr. Pendle took nine acres from the LaMunion farm, lying on the west road and built the present house, now owned and occupied by Edwin Luppold.

The old log house stood on a knoll between the school house and the house the LaMunion family lived in, which is still standing.

Abel Chase married another daughter and built a house on a five-acre lot on the west side of the road on the north line of the farm. This place is now owned and occupied by William Power. Across the way a nine-acre lot was sold off and a house built, owned and occupied by the late Ansel Converse and now by other parties. In the 70's the late Abraham Greening bought on the south, adjoining the Chase lot, eight acres on which he built a house and in the 70's sold the same to the late Walter Caffyn, who was a soldier in the Civil War. After living here several years he died, his widow dying about 1923, when the place was sold to James Inglis, who came from the Lyke farm. After living here a few years he and his wife both died. Now it is owned and occupied by George Chapman.

Thus, piece by piece, the old farm has been handed out until but few acres of the old homestead remain. The LaMunions long ago sold out and went to Michigan and the remainder of the homestead is owned by strangers.

Standing on the corner in 1845 was an old frame schoolhouse, where the writer of this sketch went to school that same year. In 1846 the present building was erected on the same site of the old one.

Our first farm on the east is the old Archy McKnutt farm. Mr. McKnutt came here in 1818. The little old house and barn stood on the north side of the road. In this little house he brought up a large family. He was twice married. By his first wife he had five children, of whom three lived to grow up. Sally married Chauncey Miner, father of Wallace W. Miner, as mentioned before. Fanny married Jason Esty, and Mary never married.

By his second wife there were two sons and one daughter, Eleanor, who married Maltby Easterly. Gibson, the oldest son, married Clarissa Patridge as above mentioned, David, for his first wife, married Gertrude Root and for his second wife married Viola Crandall, who had two daughters, one of whom became the wife of James Hibbard, who in 1925 owned the McKnutt homestead, settled by her grandfather over a century ago.

Mr. Hibbard was born on Vienna Street, Palmyra, where his grandfather settled about 1830. Mr. Hibbard went to Detroit, Mich., where he made good, came back and bought the old Armington farm adjoining on the southwest.




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At the death of Archibald McKnutt the farm of eighty acres, which he bought of William McKnutt, he gave to his four daughters. Mary and Fanny had what was on the west side of Canandaigua Road and to Sally and Eleanor he gave that lying on the east side of the same road. Mary sold her land to Francis F. Hooker, who built the house and barn in the 70's. Fanny built the south house.

In the late 40's Archibald bought of a Mr. Esty, a native of Vermont, the farm across the way where now, 1931, stands all the buildings. Mr. McKnutt had no faith in banks and kept all of his money in a chest in the house. At the time the farm was bought of Mr. Esty, his two boys, David and Gibson, carried the money over in a brass kettle, running a stick through under the bail. It took all night to count the money.

Mention has been made before of Mr. McKnutt's early life, that was spent in teaming and carrying merchandise to supply storekeepers. He was an expert horseman and raised and owned fine horses. The same could be said of his son, David, whose horses, cattle, sheep and poultry made a fine exhibit at the Palmyra Fair, where many times he received the first premium.

There are not many farms today that have been kept in the family for over a century as in this instance. The old homestead, after awhile, went into the hands of Pliny T. Sexton and is now owned and occupied by strangers.

Again we say adieu to another old pioneer farm and return to Canandaigua street. Our first farm as we go south, in the 20's, was the home of Jacob White. It was his daughter, Belinda, who married Orlando Sanders as before mentioned.

Mr. White was one of the earliest settlers. At his death the late Mr. Armington acquired the property, which was in the 30's, and while in his possession was one of the finest places in the neighborhood, but today, through the ravages of time and neglect, this once fine place has become dilapidated and forsaken.

At the death of Mr. Armington the farm passed into the hands of Morgan Doty, who after living here several years, sold the farm in the 60's to James Goodwin and during his occupancy he sold off fourteen acres on the south side of the farm to the late Robert Johnson on which he built a fine house that later burned to the ground. From James Goodwin the farm passed to John McKeuon. About 1920 James Hibbard bought the farm and also bought back the fourteen acres.

This farm and the McKnutt farm adjoining on the north makes one of the largest and finest farms around. Directly on the line between these two farms is one of the finest and largest springs of pure water in the country, covering nearly two acres of land 'and about equally divided between the two farms. Surveys have been made at different times with the view of piping the water to Palmyra village. It was found that the spring was several feet higher than the Presbyterian church steeple But it was feared, however, that the supply would not be quite adequate for the needs of the village.

We are now three miles from the village and are at the end of the




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contemplated line. But this being one of the oldest and most prominent thoroughfares leading out of the village it may be of interest to some if we extended our line of march a little farther to the south of which the Goosebeck farm would be our next which lies on the east side of the road. Mr. Goosebeck came here in the 40's. In the 60's he sold to Rufus Smith. Now the place is owned by a daughter, Mrs. Mary Smith Bush, who now lives on Washington Street, Palmyra. About 1910, the fine farm house burned to the ground. Another was soon erected on the same site.

Passing on we come to a part of the original Isaac Reynolds farm. It was in 1836 that Isaac Reynolds came from Dutchess County, New York, and purchased this farm as well as the one adjoining on the south, which included the homestead. On this farm he brought up a large family, three boys and three girls. When Platt, his 'Oldest son, got married, he took the north part of the farm, later sold to his brother, Edmund, and moved away. Edmund spent the rest 'Of his life 'On this farm and brought up three children, one son and two daughters. At his death, which occurred about 1915, the farm passed to his son, Henry, who still owns and occupies it.

Isaac Reynolds at last became an old man and in the 60's sold the homestead to the late Christopher Tilden, who owned the farm adj'Oining on the east and bought the Abel Chase place farther north where he spent the rest of his life.

His youngest son, Thomas, who married Olive Lyke, moved on the little sixteen-acre farm just north of Miner's Corners where he died. Isaac Reynolds was an Orthod'OX Quaker and belonged to the Farmington church.

After Mr. Tilden's death the farm passed to his son, William whose widow owns and 'Occupies it.

The farm across the way was in early days the Elmer Cooper farm. On this' farm was the old family burying ground where many of the Cooper and Dewey families were buried and like nearly all other family burying grounds, when the older ones pass away, thr'Ough neglect, the lot soon becomes covered with brush and weeds. After Mr. Cooper's death, which 'Occurred in the 50's, a man by the name of Tucker, who lived in Albany, bought the place and made a good many changes on the buildings and in the 60's sold the same to Alexander Purdy, a native of Macedon, a son-inlaw of Isaac Reynolds, coming here from Indiana, where he was engaged in the small fruit business for which he bought this farm for the same purpose. On this farm he carried on the business very extensively for several years, taking as a partner Robert Johnson, and the son-in-law of Mr. Reynolds. They employed some of the time as many as sixty men, women and children, making most of their profits out of the sale of plants. These two men have long ago passed away.

Many of the men and women that Mr. Purdy employed have also died and the children have gr'Own to past middle age, and will soon be in the old people's rank. Thus time passes on and the changes come.

Speaking of the old burying ground: It was the old pioneers that established our schools and churches, with their spires pointing heavenward, while far up in their steeples on each Sabbath morn the bells pealed out in welcoming tones, inviting the worshippers'to come and worship, until




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the dying echoes were lost in the forest shade. Kin and kindred of those who were buried in this old burying ground have nearly all passed away, leaving the graves unknown only to the gentle breeze that fans the wild flowers that blossom above their graves.

Once more kind nature has again planted forest trees where the song bird may nest in the branches and there fold her wings, while she chants in an unknown tongue, her sweet and untaught lays over the lonely graves of the buried dead. With solemnity and homage we bow our heads with reverence to the mouldering ashes of those old pioneers, and bid farewell to this shamefully neglected spot.

Our next farm on the south is the Randall Robinson homestead, more familiarly known as the Mormon Hill farm. This old homestead standing back from the road, almost beiIeath the shadow of Mormon Hill that almost hides it from view, is where Mr. Robinson came and settled in early days and was an old pioneer.

Mormon Hill of Joseph Smith fame is so well known all over the United States and parts of Europe that it needs no comment.

At Mr. Robinson's death the farm went to his son, Anson Robinson. In the 70's the late Admiral William T. Sampson acquired the property by purchase and it was carried on by his brother George Sampson for several years. After the Admiral's death the farm came into the hands of Pliny T. Sexton.

Across the way is the old Lyke homestead. Mr. Lyke came here in the 30's. He was a blacksmith by trade and had a little shop just north of the house where he did work for the neighborhood when not pressed with farm work. But as time passed on and Mr. Lyke became an old man the shop was abandoned and finally torn down.

Mr. Lyke had one son and two daughters. One daughter married Philander Antisdale of Marion. The youngest daughter married Thomas Reynolds, son of Isaac Reynolds. At Mr. Lyke's death the farm came to his son Jeremiah Lyke, who married Harriett, oldest daughter of Guerdon and Melissa Smith. She died in the 70's leaving a son and daughter. The daughter died several years ago. The son is now living in Buffalo. Jeremiah married for his second wife Elizabeth Johnson Tilden, whose husband was killed in the Civil War. Jeremiah died in the 90's and his wife several years later. Thus have passed away all the Lyke family, save the grandson, Edgar.

After Mr. Lyke's death the farm was sold to James Inglis, who after living here several years, sold the farm to the Mormons in 1923, and moved to the Caffyn place near the school house as before mentioned.

As the western slope of the Mormon Hill extended down on the Lyke farm, it had long been the dream of the Mormons that they might some day be able to purchase this plot of ground. It was this same year they held services on the hill for one week.

Mormons came from all parts of the United States and Canada to attend these meetings. On Sunday the crowd was immense, many coming in their automobiles from near and far, perhaps to stay only a short time, while others made their pilgrimage to the top of the hill to hear the most




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eloquent speaking, or listen to singers whose musical voices were unsurpassed. But the future of Mormon Hill and the result of Mormon faith we will leave for philosophers to decide upon.

We are now just four miles from Palmyra village and this concludes our journey in the country. We have been on every road leading out of the village. In our journey we have visited the homes of many a pioneer or pressed the ground with our feet where once they trod. We have seen the old fireplace that once shed its light and heat from its burning back log. Through imagination we have visited the homes of the old pioneer, and of their children's children. We have mourned with them in their adversity and with them we have rejoiced in their prosperity. Vole have heard the sound of the pioneers' axe until it died away in whispering tones, and the wail of the forest has departed with the winds, and the landscape is dotted with fertile fields and pleasant homes. The flail, the old bull plow and the ox team are nearly lost in the depths of antiquity. The log house, the post boy and the stage coach have all passed into history. Great indeed would be the amazement of the pioneer could he return to this community and view the changes that have been made in the mode of living, and in every line of industry.

In this four mile journey we have found but three persons bearing the same name and occupying the same homestead of ninety years ago, Wallace Miner and Henry Reynolds and his sister, Minnie. All the rest have passed away and the old homesteads are now occupied by strangers. Unconscious of the past, they know but little of the hardships of our early settlers.

And now with fond remembrances of the past and best wishes for the future, we bid farewell to the country and once more return to the village where we will visit some of the places that we left for a future date, and in doing so let's go back once more to General John Swift's time and begin a new line of inspection of which our first visit will be to the churches.

THE  CHURCHES

THE  FIRST  CHURCH

Palmyra pioneers had their first church in the eastern part of the town in 1807. The first church in the western part (in the village) was erected in 1811, on land given by General Swift for a union church. As the majority of the churchgoing people were Presbyterians, it was built almost by that society and occupied until 1832.

This same building was used as a town hall. It was of wood, painted white with green blinds, and was burned in 1838.

In its dimensions it stood fifty feet in length and forty feet in depth. It was surmounted by a steeple. The location of this church was on the west side of Church Street, just south of the old cemetery.

Connected with this old church was a sexton and grave digger, who was a personage who seemed to have received the title of "Old Gibbs," probably because of his age rather than any thought of disrespect.

Someone has contributed the following with reference to him: Having never been naturalized, he took the law the natural way and what he conceived




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to be right was law for him. The pastor's daughters, thinking to escape the eye of their father, took seats in the gallery of the old meeting house on the hill, where they indulged freely in their pranks. Gibbs bore it patiently for some time. On one occasion it became unbearable. HE walked quietly behind one of the young lasses, placed his hand under her arms and brought her over the bench in a twinkling, so softly the preacher did not observe it and the culprit dared not complain.

At another time a young lady in the habit of going to meeting in the evening to have some fun, sat on the back seat in the long room under neath the gallery. Gibbs had his eye on her, but he had this advantage: When you thought he was looking at you he was looking the other way; and when you thought he was looking the other way, he was looking at you. Gibbs took her by the arm to lead her out. She resisted and a scuffle ensued, but Gibbs conquered. The minister thought some one had fainted and the meeting went on. Not so, young America. They called a meeting after services and voted to lynch the old man the first time he ventured out on the street in the evening. Gibbs took the alarm and was sure to be at home before sundown for some time.

A very good man had died, whose praises was in all the churches. It was proposed to erect a stone to his memory by subscription. Gibbs was to circulate the paper.

He offered it to a wealthy man and recent convert, who declined, saying, "We all had a spot in our hearts for that good man." "Yes," said Gibbs, "and you have had it there so long it has become stone, too, and for this reason I want to transplant it in a proper placeo"

He was constant in his attendance at meetings, but seldom spoke. On one occasion he arose and said, "Brethren, I don't want to take up much time, but my pork barrel is very low," and sat down.

In Summer he was gardener of Palmyra village. At a meeting one June evening, he arose and said, "This church reminds me of cucumbers at a season of revival; like the plant in June, you grow and flourish, but when the wind gets into the north you are all dead." About this time he was seen ringing the bell at the Episcopal Church. "How is this," said one. "Oh," said he, "like the ministers, I have had a louder call over the .way." He often enumerated the number he had buried and the whole families he had laid side by side in his vocation. The writer says of him, which_ I quote: "The last time I saw him, he "Tas leaning on his spade in the grave yard, with one eye upon the earth and the other upon heaven, discussing the ingratitude of corporations. 'I have asked,' said he, 'for a little spot that I could prepare and beautify with my own hands for this poor body, with some humble stone and unique inscription to tell the stranger that in twenty-five years these hands have gathered in nearly three hundred bodies, and it was not granted.'"

Soon after he made his way to Buffalo. In his destitution he called on a humane lady, who had known him in Palmyra, rehearsed the story of his labors, his poverty and his grief. She gave him money to take him to a neighboring county. In a few months all that remained of "Old Gibbs"




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was deposited in Potter's field and unhonored. We shall never see his like again.

PRESBYTERIAN  CHURCH

In 1831 a new church was projected and a lot was bought off the northeast corner of Main and Church Streets, of the late Colonel George Beckwith, where in 1832 the present Western Presbyterian Church was erected. It is therefore the oldest church building in the village, still in use as a church. The main part of the edifice as originally constructed, is eighty-two by fifty-two feet and of brick, surmounted by a high steeple in which at one time was installed a town clock. This rang out the hours day and night for many years. The late Giles Crandall, for a long time, had charge of the clock. In time, the mechanical parts became so worn that· its use was finally abandoned and the village authorities, who had become interested in the care of it, had it removed, and it may now be found stored in the attic of the village hall, while today the old bell, its old companion, although further up in the steeple, can be heard each Sabbath morning calling the worshippers together to worship, as loud and clear as over ninety years ago, when first installed; while the weather vane, still higher up and far above the gilded ball, accurately points out the way of the wind.

The extension of this grand old church, with its massive columns, is somewhat dimmed with age, but still retains its substantial appearance, while within, all is fresh and attractive. The lecture room at the northeast, was built some years ago. Later an addition was built on at the north, which has many conveniences. The architect of the church was Abner Lakey and the contractor of the original church was Asa Millard, who in September went to Guerdon Smith on Saturday and asked him to get out the rafters for the church and get them out in a hurry.

Mr. Smith was compelled to attend company training on Monday. By Tuesday Mr. Smith had seven scorers and two hewers engaged. In four days the job was done, twenty-two sticks, forty-four feet long, size 8xlO inches. No wonder the roof stands true. Today it would be no easy task to find that number of men to do that amount of work in so short a time, for in those days men knew how to use an axe. The interior of the church has been changed from its original arrangement. The pulpit at one time was at the south end, instead of the north end, as at present.

An interesting document, that of a pew deed to pew No. 47, and dated December 30, 1837, is legal in appearance and phraseology, and bears an imprint of the seal of the corporation "W. P. Ch. and So., Palmyra."

The purchase price of this particular pew was one hundred dollars and the deed was issued to David S. Jackway. The following names appear upon the instrument as signers and evidently those of the trustees: James Jenner, Newton Foster, Robert W. Smith, J. S. Eggleston, H. K. Jerome and Nathan Warner. George N. Williams was probably the clerk and signed as witness.

In 1856 the present organ was placed in the church. The first organist was Miss Julia Seeley She died in the early 60's at the age of twenty-two years. She was a sister of the late Andrew Seeley.




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Long years have passed since this church was built, and those whose untiring energy and ceaseless devotion to their Christian faith and for the welfare to the community in which they lived, have all passed away, each one willing to lend a helping hand. Among those was General Thomas Rogers, who had the distinction of wheeling out the first wheelbarrow load of dirt for the basement.

At the time the ehurch was built, Rev. Samuel W. Whepley, who came in September, 1831, had charge of the pastorate. He was succeeded by the following ministers: Rev. George R. H. Shumway, who came in 1834; Rev. Nathaniel W. Fisher, 1840; Rev. Goetner, D. D., stated supply, 1848; Rev. Horace Eaton, D. D., 1849; Rev. Warren H. Landon, D. D., 1879; Rev. Herbert D. Cone, 1887; Stephen G. Hopkins, 1890; Rev. Angus Hugh Cameron, 1897; Rev. Peter McKenzie, 1904; Rev. Boyd McCleary, B. D., 1915; Rev. Thomas Tighe, B. D., 1922; Rev. Robert G. Higinbotham, the present pastor, 1931.

BAPTIST  CHURCH

The first Baptist Church of Palmyra was organized at the home of Lemuel Spear, May 25, 1800, with nineteen members. In 1808, a frame meeting house was built on the main road between the Yellow Mill and Walworth and about forty rods north of the Quaker Road and on the west side of the road near the school house on the knoll. There, for thirty-two years, it was the representation of the Baptist element of the towns of Palmyra and Macedon and attained influence and strength. November 9, 1832, a portion of the church, believing that the growing village of Palmyra required the formation of a church of the Baptist faith within its limits, obtained honorable dismissal to organize a branch church, which was done at the home of Rev. John D. Heath. Their effort was only partially successful. Instead of forming a new society, they returned to the fellowship of the old one on condition that the meetings should be held in the old church one-half of the time.

In February, 1835, the effort to create an independent churcn in Palmyra village was renewed. Many meetings were held. Advisory councils were called and in the end it was settled that the old church should adopt a new name and remove to another locality, while the colony should bear the former title.

The mother church removed with the house of worship to Macedon. The colony organized as at present known, in the year 1835 and was composed of seventy-eight members.

Its first clerk was D. Rogers. Its first board of deacons consisted of William Parke, E. R. Spear and R. C. Jackson. The trustees were William Rogers, R. C. Jackson and Stephen Spear. Services were held in the meeting house on Burial Hill until it was burned in 1838. Then tbey were held in upper rooms and in the Town House, until the old stone church was dedicated. Its first pastor was Elder P. T. Richards, followed by Elder Henry V. Jones, who commenced on April 1, 1835, at a salary of $250.00 per year. Others followed on in this order: Elder M. I. Crane, 1837; Elder Austin H. Stowell, 1839; Elder Samuel Wilson, 1840; Rev. A. H. Burlingame, 1841.




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On January 28, 1841, the church dedicated its first house of worship, a substantial structure built of stone and thoroughly finished. Its site was on the southwest corner of Canandaigua and Main Streets. Its dimensions were 40x60 feet and in its basement, audience room accommodations were added.

This building stood for nearly thirty years when it was dismantled to give place to a finer and more commodious edifice. The following pastors followed Rev. Burlingame: Rev. w. H. Douglap, 1842'; Rev. Daniel Harrington, 1843; Rev. G. W. Gates, 1852; Rev. W. R. Webb, 1853; Rev. W. Mudge, 1857; Rev. Samuel Adsit, 1862; Rev. C. N. Pattengill, 1867.

This lengthened period was characterized by peaceful and prosperous growth and a faithful devotion to its legitimate work. The new building was completed and dedicated March 28, 1871. It is of pressed brick in Romanesque style. It is 90 feet long by 52 feet wide. Upon one corner is a spire one hundred and twenty feet high. The interior presents a beautiful auditorium on the main floor. It is finished in the best of modern style with frescoes, natural wood and stained glass windows. Beneath is a commodious chapel. The property is free from debt, and for size, comfort and looks, holds its own with other churches which form the quadrangle upon street corners. The late George Williams was the contractor and builder and at the completion of the building, Mr. Williams presented to the society, the pulpit as a gift.

Rev. C. N. Pattengill was the last pastor in the old church and the first in the new. Since his time the pulpit has been occupied by the following: Rev. H. Wheat, 1874; Rev. Addison Parker, 1876; Rev. J. C. Thoms, 1881; Rev. J. R. Henderson, 1885; Rev. F. H. Adams, 1897; Rev. G. H. Hubbard, 1903; Rev. J. L. Cann, 1909; Rev. G. H. Hubbard, 1918; Rev. J. C. Brookins, 1919; Rev. W. A. Billings, 1923; Rev. A. L. Boynton (supply), 1929; Rev. W. A. Ashmore, the present minister, came here in 1930.

METHODIST  CHURCH

The dates on which to bear a history of this church are very meager and scattering. This sketch must therefore prove brief and imperfect.

Methodism was introduced into what is now Wayne County at an early date. Along with pioneer settlers came the pioneer preachers, "'To prepare the way of the Lord and to make His path straight." The old "circuit riders" were a noble band and under God they achieved grand results. Who first preached Methodism in Palmyra we cannot tell. The time must have been about 1808 or 1809, as in that year the first class was formed, according to the Methodist discipline and the itinerants did not preach often in a community without gathering sufficient number to form a society. Theirs was not only to preach the gospel, but to found churches, and thereby maintain its institutions.

The class at Palmyra was connected with the Ontario circuit, Genesee Conference. The circuit was one of three weeks and covered territory now occupied by some fifteen Methodist churches with no less than twenty-five hundred members, and enjoying the services of these traveling preachers.




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For eleven years the little band at Palmyra met to worship in dwellings, school houses, barns, tents and groves. The world held them in light esteem, but they prospered and their numbers grew. In 1822 they formed themselves into a society according to legal enactment, elected trustees, and erected their first edifice in what was then a forest on the east side of Johnson Street, about twenty rods south of Vienna Street. (The writer of this sketch attended church there in 1844 when it was still a forest. It has been erroneously stated that the church was on Vienna Street.)

Here they worshipped for a quarter of a century. The oldest record now in existence, contains a list of all who were members of the church in 1832. The enumeration gives the names of one hundred fifty-five persons. The late William F. Jarvis was the last survivor until in the early 80's, when he passed away.

In the old chapel, as it was called, the Genesee Conference held its seventeenth session during June, 1826. Bishop McKendrol presided. A camp meeting was held at the same time in the grove. On Sabbath morning the Bishop preached in the grove to a congregation of a number of thousand. Old records say not less than ten thousand were on the ground during the day.

In 1847, during the pastorate of Rev. B. McLouth, the church edifice was moved to the east side of Cuyler Street on a site given by William F. Jarvis. The edifice was remodeled at considerable expense. In 1856 the Genesee Conference held the ninth session under a large tent in Hathaway Grove on Cuyler Street. At this time under the presidency of Bishop Ames, Rev. J. N. Brown was their pastor. During the pastorate of Rev. Thomas Tousey, which began in the Fall of 1863, and continued three years, a new church edifice was projected. Through the persistent efforts of the pastor, subscriptions to the amount of $15,000 were procured, and on the twentythird of July, 1866, the ground was broken for a new temple on the former site of the Ainsworth tavern, the first one built in the village.

Qn August 21, 1866, the corner stone was laid and on October 31, 1867, during the pastorate of Rev. C. B. Fox, the completed edifice was dedicated, $15,000 more being raised that day to remove all the indebtedness.

The church is of brick with trimmings of cut stone. It consists of a main edifice, 85x52 feet, and a wing, 69x34 feet. The spire is 150 feet high. The entire cost, including the site, was $30,000. The parsonage, just north of the church, was once the old Washington Hall. In 1904 a new parsonage was built on the site and Washington Hall was sold to the late Dr. W. J. Hennessey and moved to Charlotte Avenue, where it stands today, and bids fair to furnish shelter and comfort for its occupants for many years to come. The new parsonage was built under the supervision of Rev. E. J. Brooker at a cost of 1$5,000. In January, 1905, Mr. Brooker moved into the new parsonage. At that time payment had been provided for. Mr. Brooker was the pastor of this church seven years and during his stay in Palmyra made many warm friends out of the· church as well as among his congregation.

After Rev. Brooker the following ministers occupied the Methodist




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pulpit: Rev. Walter S. Wright, 1911-1922; Rev. Jesse Mullette, 1922-1926; Rev. Howard L. Rixon, 1926-1929. Rev. L. D. Bell, the present minister, came here in 1929.

The old church on Cuyler Street was sold to the late Calvin Seeley, who used it for a carriage show room. In the 70's, the late Alexander Purdy bought the property. It was again used for several years for religious purposes until in the 80's when the meetings were discontinued and Pliny T. Sexton became owner of the property.

ZION  EPISCOPAL  CHURCH

Doubtless the first local services of the Episcopal Church were held by the Missionary, Davenport Phelps. The church was organized as a parish June 23, 1828, under the ministry of Rev. Rufus Murray, who had been elected to the charge in 1822. Originally the services were 'held in the old academy on Church Street, near the site of St. Anne's Roman Catholic ·Church. At the time that Zion Church was organized it was the first Episcopal church in the county. The meeting was held in the old academy, Rev. Rufus Murray being present. Mr. Joseph Colt and Mr. Benjamin Billings, sr., were unanimously chosen ward.ens, and Joseph Hallett, Alexander Tiffany, Hiram K. Jerome, Thomas P. Baldwin, William Capron, Leonard Westcott, Solomon St. John and Vincent G. Barney were chosen vestrymen. On September 2, 1827, the cornerstone of their first edifice w'as laid, and on February 1, 1829, it was consecrated by Rt. Rev. Bishop Hobart. The edifice was of wood and stood on the present site. The dimensions were 40x35 feet with galleries on three sides and it would seat xxx2'00 persons.

In 1831, a bell was procured and through the liberality of two of the members a rectory was built, which was enlarged in 1854.

Rev. George D. Gillespie became rector in 1851, and during his pastorate the Gillespie fund was started, which was intended to endow the parish against adversity. He resigned in 1861 and became bishop of Western Michigan.

In 1852 a chancel was added with other improvements. It served its purpose until 1872, when the present handsome structure was commenced. Just previous to this the society bought the old "brick house on the corner, which was the first brick building in the village, as before mentioned. This old house was torn down, thus making a beautiful site for the new church.

As Benjamin Billings, sr., was one of the builders of the first church, so was Benjamin Billings, 2d, one of the builders of the sec.ond church. He was warden for many years, the longest anyone had been in that office at the time of his death, July 24, 1889, as mentioned before. He was one of the building committee together with Rev. John G. Webster, George W. Cuyler and Chares McLouth. He paid $1,000 towards the erection of the new church.

The new edifice is of Medina sandstone. The present steeple is 125 feet high and was built by the late George W. Cuyler as a memorial to his deceased children. The stone for the lining· of this steeple were drawn by T. L. Cook from the Salt farm, west of Manchester village, and from the Newton farm, east of the village, making two trips each day.




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The church was consecrated by Rt. Rev. Bishop Cleveland Cox, July 22, 1873.

Rev. Webster remained as reetor until 1884 or almost twenty years. He was succeeded by the Rev. Charles T. Coer who remained only two years. It was during his rectorship that the Woman's Guild was organized. The Rev. Leonard W. Richardson for nine happy years supplied the spiritual needs of a growing congregation. The Boys' Club and the "Little Gleaners" interested him very much while he was in Palmyra.

Rev. Charles T. Walkley came here in 1895 and remained until 1901. He was followed by Rev. E. S. Towson, 1901-1909, who had a fine reputation as a preacher.

Rey. E. H. Edson came here in 1910 and was at the helm of affairs in Zion parish until 1916 when he was succeeded by Rev. Jerome Kates who remained until 1921. During this rectors hip a strong feeling of harmony was built up in Zion Church. Rev. John S. Carrie became rector of Zion Church in 1921 and had charge of the religious ceremonies until 1925.

Rev. A. Sidney Attridge was instituted as rector of Zion Church June 7, 1925. Under the leadership of Mr. Attridge the church has grown materially and spiritually and now enjoys unprecedented prosperity.

ST. ANNE'S  ROMAN  CATHOLIC  CHURCH

The first mass was said in Palmyra by Father O'Riley of Rochester. St. Anne's Catholic Church was originated in 1849 by Rev. Edward O'Conner of Canandaigua, who had for some time said occasional mass in William's Hall. The Catholics were few in number and were immigrated from Ireland. In 1848 or 49 Rev. Edward O'Conner purchased from Willliam Aldrich the old brick academy situated on Church Street and converted it into a Catholic church. It was in use as such until 1860, when the present brick church, 60x40 feet was erected upon the same lot and the old structure taken down. In February, 1861, the house was blessed by Bishop Timon. The cornerstone of the new St. Anne's Church was laid on the 26th day of July, (St. Anne's Day) 1864. It was consecrated and laid by Very Rev. Michael O'Brien, vicar general of the diocese of Buffalo, and then pastor of St. Patrick's, Rochester. He was assisted by the pastor and several neighboring priests. Although not finished, it was used for divine services. It was completed in 1870, and on October 23 of the same year the house was dedicated by Right Rev. Bernard J. McQuaid. A new altar was erected, new pews built and the church frescoed. In September, 1856, Father Casey, who remained here until about 1895, purchased from George J. Jessup, Esq., for $1,000 the two lots with house and barn south of the old church. This place was remodeled in 1873 at a cost of $3,000, George Williams being the builder.

About 1920 this old house was sold and moved to the north end and west side of Church Street. The old cellar was filled and the ground leveled off and a fine new dwelling was erected on the north side of the lot, thus giving a beautiful view to the north and west.

Father Casey became feeble and left about 1895. His place was taken by Rev. J. E. Hartley, who was generally liked by the people both in his




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church and outside. In 1903 the congregation added a belfry and vestibule while in October of the same year a bell was hung, the gift of Mrs. Mary Darmody. Father Hartley passed away in 1920 and was succeeded by Rev. E. J. Dwyer, who died July 3, 1930. This vacancy was filled by Father Hugh Crowley, who came here from Penn Yan.

Since the origination of St. Anne's Church the parish has given three candidates to the ministry, Thomas M. Moore, Francis Goggin, D. D., Professor in St. Bernard's Seminanry in Rochester, and John Bernard Maxwell.

DUTCH  REFORMED  CHURCH

The Dutch Reformed Church of Palmyra, the outgrowth of a mission, was organized August 15, 1887, with thirty-four members. Services were held in the Presbyterian church until March, 1890, when the old Methodist church on Cuyler Street was bought of P. T. Sexton. Here they held their meetings until they sold the building, to the Independent Order of Red Men, and purchased the present site on Canandaigua Street and erected a neat little church and parsonage, the former at a cost of $10,500. In dimensions it is 50x54 feet, is made of brick and also has a basement where they have their Sunday School meetings. In the rear they have a very large hitch barn, 50xl00 feet that will accommodate fifty horses. This is all enclosed so that all horses and carriages are sheltered from the storm. To do all this work, everyone lent a helping hand, young as well as old, being willing to do their share in building both church and parsonage. This little church, as well as parsonage, is "both an ornament to the street as well as a credit to the society.

Only three different ministers have had charge of this little church, the first one being Rev. Garrett Flikkema, who at one time had been minister in the old church on Cuyler Street. It was during his pastorate that the Christian Endeavor Society and Woman's Missionary Society was formed.

He was succeeded by Rev. M. Stegenga who came in 1918 and stayed less than two years.

The present minister, Rev. H. E. Tellman, came here on March 13, 1920, from Pultneyville. Many improvements have been made since his installation and through the untiring efforts of the congregation, the church and parsonage are now free from debt, the last payment having been made about 1928 or 1929. The Sunday school rooms and kitchen were also remodeled in the Winter of 1931. New classes formed since Mr. Tellman's installation include the Baraca and Philathea Classes and the Young People's Bible Classes, the latter of which was formed in the Winter of 1930-01931.

CHURCH  OF  GOD

Across the way is the Church of God. The site on which this little church stands was purchased of Mrs. Charlotte Birdsall and was built largely by the Society donating their time. Meetings are held here regularly, besides having a Sunday School. Rev. Ross Colgrove has been the pastor for several years.




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CHRISTIAN  SCIENCE  SOCIETY

Christian Science was first brought to the notice of a few people of Palmyra in 1886, when Mrs. Florence A. Crump of Buffalo was healed through its teachings. She invited a lecturer to come to her old home town and talk to some friends who responded to her invitation.

In 1900 Miss Alice E. Gifford came home from the West, where she became interested in Christian Science, and in 1903 a lecture was given in the opera house by a member of the board of lectureship of the Mother Church, the First Church of Christ Scientist, in Boston, Massachusetts.

In 1904 Miss Gifford and a few other interested persons organized a Christian Science Society. Rooms were rented in the Rannie block and services were held there every Sunday morning.

In 1905 they moved to the Good Templars' room, remaining there eight years. Then they moved to what is now Odd Fellows' Hall.

During these years the societf had the staunch support and loving advice of Miss Gifford, who is now a Christian Science practitioner located in St. Petersburg, Florida.

At present the society holds their services in a room over the Wayne County Trust Company banking rooms.

THE  MORMON  CHURCH

The Latter Day Saints (Mormons) of whom we have already given the history, hold their meetings in their hall on Cuyler Street. Elder W. W. Bean is in charge.

THE  QUAKER  SOCIETY

Perhaps it may be interesting to some to give a little of the early history of this Society, called Friends or Quakers in this part of the state, and in doing so we will go back to the early settlement of the town of Farmington.

In 1790 the Friends or Quakers, under the leadership of Nathan Comstock, sr., made the first settlement in Farmington. They emigrated from Massachusetts, much against the approval of the Society there, whose custom it was to decide all important steps such as journeys into the wilderneS8. As a result of their indignant act, they were disowned by the Mother Society, until 1794, when some of the Quakers came West to attend "Pickering's Treaty," at Canandaigua and observing the prosperity of the new settlements, reported it on their return home, with the result that they were taken back into the Society.

Their early meetings were held at the home of Abram Lapham, who later came to Macedon. In 1796, a double log house was built near the site of the present Orthodox church. One side was used as a school and the other for divine services. It was regarded as the first house of worship west of Clinton, Oneida County. In December, 1803, it was destroyed by fire and the meetings were held in the Orthodox meeting house on the Lemuel Durfee farm in the woods in Palmyra, until a new church could be built. This church later became a Hicksite church of which more will . be said later. A new frame meeting house was built by the Society in 1804. It was covered with clapboards made from split cedar, cut in fourfoot lengths, shaved to a proper thickness and fastened with wrought nails,




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made by the neighborhood blacksmith. Sawed lumber was very difficult to purchase and building was done with means at command. No attempt at ornaments was made in the interior and boards took the place of slats.

On February 22, 1816, the growth of the membership caused an inconvenience to all from the limited capacity of the place of worship, and it was concluded to enlarge it, but after due consideration this project was dropped and a new building resolved on and completed in 1817. It was erected on the west side of the road, opposite the old one at a cost of $2,250.

This meeting house had bare floors, unpainted, straight-backed, hardwood benches and sliding panels in the center, as the brothers and sisters worshipped separately.

The Society worshipped in concord until the Spring of 1828, when Elias Hicks of Long Island, a prominent Friend and fluent speaker toured this part of the country, and in the meetings that followed preached doctrines out of harmony with the established belief. But, however, his doctrine was so convincing that quite a body of Friends accepted the new doctrine and as a result, a separation took place on June 26, 1828, and the two branches became known as Orthodox and Hicksite.

The latter remained in the new church, while the former, considered to be the rightful society, went back to the old church across the way. Later, in 1875, this was burned and in 1876 a new one was erected, built by D. C. Brundage, where now a large congregation of old and young still assemble each first day for divine worship, conducted by a local preacher.

The Hicksites flourished for a good many years, holding services in the old large meeting house on first and fifth days of the week, for a good many years. Sunderlin P. Gardner who was a farmer and lived not far away, was their preacher. He was an able speaker and was called outside of his Society many times to preach at funerals. Each year in June, a yearly meeting was held when speakers came from New York, Philadelphia and Canada. On this occasion the sliding panels were raised in order to make more room that was required to accommodate the larger crowd. The most prominent members sat upon the high seats, the men sitting on one side and the women on the other side. This conference lasted nearly a week, always holding over Sunday, which was the second Sunday in June and was the great day when the young man took his best girl for a ride. But as time passed on and the older members, one by one dropped away, and many of their children found homes in other parts of the country, the congregation became so small that services were held only occasionally, and for some time yearly meetings were discontinued until after a lapse of several years, when again yearly nleetings were held in the Hicksite church in Farmington, usually about the first of October, when speakers came from various parts of the country. Among those who were generally present were the famous Isaac Wilson of Philadelphia, whose sermons called people from near and far to hear this able man.

But today! The old Friends meeting house has been sold, the older generation having passed away, and many of the younger generation either unmindful or unconscious of past strife have been drawn back to the old Orthodox Society of Friends where they are made welcome.

For some time it was thought by the Society and citizens of Farmington




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that a suitable memorial should be placed on the same site of the old meeting house, which was the first meeting house built west of Utica. Accordingly several meetings were held by the members of the Society and citizens, and contributions and pledges were given to carry out this project. Among the contributors to the Hicksite Memorial Fund was President Hoover, whose mother was a famous Quaker minister, and he, himself, was a member of the Society of Friends and on October 6, 1929, the formal dedication memorial service was held, when a two-ton granite monument with a bronze tablet, bearing historical data was unveiled at 2.30 o'clock on the site of the old church.

Let us return to Palmyra: There being a good many Quakers around Palmyra, an Orthodox church was built in about 1800, in a primeval forest on the Walker Road, on the Lemuel Durfee farm. It was at this meeting house the Friends of the Farmington church came for a while to worship when their church had been destroyed by fire in 1803. This was used as an Orthodox church until the division in 1828. Mr. Durfee being a believer in the Hicksite doctrine, and the meeting house being on his land, henceforth the new dispensation was preached, while those of the Orthodox belief built a new church about 1830, on top of the hill near the New York Central depot on the Walker Road.

Meetings were held here until around 1848, when the attendance was so small it was thought best to discontinue the meetings and sell the property which was converted into a dwelling house. It was owned and occupied by the Parliman sisters.

Long years have passed since the Quakers held their meetings here and but very few know that this dwelling house was once a Quaker church.

Returning to the 'Old Hicksite church on the Durfee farm: This Society flourished for a good many years until the older members had passed away. The attendance became so small the Society thought best to move this little old yellow meeting house that was so near and dear to the hearts of those old Christian people who came here to worship, to Macedon Center. When in the 50's a bee was made, the old meeting house was taken down and carried away on wagons. Among some of those who lent a helping hand were Elihu Durfee, Guerdon Tracy Smith and William Green. The latter at that time, was a young man. He died in 1924, being the last survivor.

The circular road leading from the highway to the meeting house, one coming in from the north and the other coming in from the south, nleeting at the meeting house door, and the level plot where the meeting house stood upon its foundation stones, are the only remnants that mark the spot where once it stood. Large trees have grown and are now occupying the site of the old church and circular roadway. The names of its builders have long been forgotten and those who in later years helped to move the little old yellow meeting hDuse to Macedon have long ago passed away and the Friends' yellow meeting house in the woods is known only by what the glimmering light of history may reveal.

The Quaker hat and bonnet are no longer seen. The plain language, "thee and thou," are no longer heard. The children and grandchildren of




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those law-abiding and Christian people have dropped the customs of old and wandered away from the path they were taught to follow.

One custom of the Friends was their conscientious use of wearing apparel. All ornaments were discarded, their clothes were made in the plainest style and mostly of drab color. No metal buttons were used upon a garment. Men wore high hats, both in the house and in their meetings and it is said that pioneer Nathan Comstock, slept at night with his hat on.

They refused to do military duty for which they suffered fines and humiliation, and though obedienee to the law is a citizen's first duty, their steadfastness to their belief aroused the admiration of all and finally triumphed.

Although they did not believe in war, yet an insult was not always cordially received. A story was told of a law abiding Quaker who had patiently borne the insults and injuries of a man until it became unbearable. He finally pulled off his coat and said: "Old Quaker, you lie there while I lick this man." They called no man master, always addressing both men and women by their given name. On parting with friend or stranger it was farewell instead of goodbye. The days of the week were called by their number instead of name. Their preachers received no pay, "Freely ye have received, freely give." Women fastened their hair with wooden hairpins, made by whittling a hardwood stick smooth and pointed at one end. Later combs were made out of cow horn, perfectly plain and natural color. They wore kerchiefs about the neck, and. plain poke bonnets which were guarded with the utmost care, and while riding a very thin oil cloth, made on purpose, was drawn over the bonnet. After arriving at their destination, the oil cloth was removed. Although the bonnets were plain, yet they were no cheap affair.

While at the table, before partaking food, they would sit and with solemnity and silence give thanks to their Heavenly Father.

At their meetings they never had singing or church music. Sometimes at their meetings, not a word would be said, and after waiting nearly an hour in silence and no one had said anything, one of the men on the high seat would shake hands with the one next to him and the meeting was out. Then sometimes only a few words would be said.

It was said that at one time at a meeting, after waiting some time and no one spoke, one old Quaker arose and said he had been thinking of three things, coffee pot, tea pot and tobacco box, then sat down, thus pointing out the three evils.

The Quakers married themselves. The couple that were going to be married would come into the room together and sit down two or three minutes, then arise and join their right hands. Then the groom would say, "I, Guerdon Tracy Smith, take thee, Violet Blaker, to be my lawful and wedded wife, promising through divine assistance to be unto thee a kind and wedded husband." Then after the bride had repeated very much the same the groom would say, "In the eyes of the law, we are now man and wife."

EAST  PALMYRA  PRESBYTERIAN  CHURCH

Religious services in the present town of Palmyra were first held in




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private houses among the members of the Long Island colony in 1792. In the company were five persons, members of the Presbyterian church at Southampton, Massachusetts, and two of them, S. Reeves and D. H. Foster, were ruling elders. Meetings were held regularly every Sabbath in private houses until the Fall of 1793, when they moved to the annex of David Foster's house, which had been used as a school room, where on December 5, 1793, a church was organized under the Congregational form of government. This is claimed to be the first instance of the organization of a permanent Congregational church in the Genesee Country, and except that of Windsor, the first in Western New York and was the first church organized in the state west of the Pre-Emption Line. The organizer was Rev. Ira Condit, and the constituent members were: David H. Foster and wife, Mary, Stephen Reeves and wife, Mary, IIo\\Tellxxx Fort, Mrs. Sarah Starks, Nathaniel Terry and wife, Anna, Moses Culver, Jonah Howell, sr., and Benjamin Hopkins and wife, Sarah. James Reeves was clerk; Stephen Reeves and David H. Foster, elders; Elias Reeves, Stephen Post and Benjamin Hopkins, trustees.

In 1806 a meeting was called to consider the p'ropriety of erecting a house' of worship. The site was a nlatter of sharp discussion. Oliver Clark promised $100 if on the north side of the creek; $50 if on the south side.

"One hundred dollars," said Humphrey Sherman, "if on the south side; nothing if on the north side."

The site was established where the church building in East Palmyra now stands. The amount subscribed was $969.49. The dimensions of the house were 54x64 feet. Gideon Durfee and Humphrey Sherman gave the land, the latter the west half. Sherman insisted "that there were some men for whom it was not meet to provide seats on holy ground," and insisted that his side of the house should be occupied by the women. His regulation lacked enforcement.

Desire to occupy outran ability to complete the house. It was raised in July, 1807, and was a model of the old Southampton church, built a century before. It remained for a time incomplete. Beneath its roof the sheep from an adjoining pasture found shelter. Of twenty windows, five were glazed, the rest were covered with rough boards. There was no steeple, no plastering or wainscoting. In the naked rafters, the swallow had its nest, and a wheelwright seasoned his timber, or a farmer cured his flax, in the loft above. The pulpit rested on one pedestal and was shaped like a goblet. It was built of basswood boards. There were doors on the east, north and west. The gallery extended around three sides and the choir occupied the entire front, Deacon David H. Foster being in the center with his pipe to give the pitch, and the other deacons sitting in front of the pulpit. Paul Reeves had charge of the work and the raising of the frame occupied a day and a half, and it is stated that the frame was not raised until a few gallons of whiskey had been supplied to the men. Such was the primitive church.

The house was dedicated January 11, 1810. The dedicatory sermon was preached by Rev. Howell Powell from Genesis 28:17, when Rev.




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Benjamin Bell was pastor. The building having been repaired and modernized, was reconsecrated on January 12, 1843. Rev. Ira Ingraham of Lyons preached on that occasion. The present church was dedicated on January 12, 1870 by Rev. Horace Eaton, D. D.

In 1807, the church adopted the Presbyterian form of government and was attached to the Geneva presbytery. Itinerant missionaries were the first supplies. In 1795 Rev. Johnson was employed for a time and in 1800 Rev. Eleazar Fairbanks began to serve the church and remained about three years.

A Mr. Lane was employed for a season; then Rev. Benjamin Bell ministered until the close of 1808. In about 1810, Rev. Hippocrates Rowe began as a supply, was ordained,and, on July 8, 1811, installed pastor, and remained until May 2, 1816, when he was succeeded by Stephen M. Wheelock. Two separate churches were formed on February 18, 1817; the original church of Palmyra was known as the Presbyterian Church of East Palmyra. The first supply after the division was Daniel E. Buttrick, later a missionary of the Cherokee Indians. On August 17,1817, Rev. Benjamin Bailey was installed pastor and remained four years. Rev. Eggleston preached a year and then for a time various persons gave occasional sermons. Rev. Francis Pomeroy was the next pastor. He served the church in 1825, and continued until 1831. Daniel Johnson served a year. Ministers in those days had anything but an easy time. This pastor is remembered as having boarded around among his parishioners as the olden time schoolmaster. After Johnson were D. N. Merritt, two years, and Archibald Robertson, the same period. The latter was young and single. He taught school in No.7 and aided his parishioners in the harvest field. During the Winter of 1838 Lewis Bridgman presided over the church a few months. In 1840 Benjamin B. Smith served this and the Port Gibson churches. N ext came Charles Kenyon; then Rev. Eliphalet A. Platt, who from 1841 remained 14 years and Aaron Spencer followed for a few months. W. W. Collins came next and remained four years. In 1859 A. H. Lilly began and remained 11 years. Successors have been F. A. Spencer from January to April, 1871; Rev. Alvin Cooper, August, 1871 to November, 1872; Rev. W. B. Dada from December, 1872.

The Western Presbyterian Church of Palmyra was set off from the parent church on February 26,1817, as mentioned before. The new organization was completed through the assistance of Rev. Francis Pomeroy and began with 56 members. Rev. Stephen Wheelock preached for a time. He died in Vermont, August 12, 1847. Rev. Jesse Townsend was installed August 2'9, 1817, and remained three years. He was the first regular pastor and died in Palmyra, August, 1838, aged 73 years. Rev. Daniel C. Hopkins supplied two years, beginning in January, 1822. Rev. Benjamin B. Stockton was installed in February, 1824, and continued about four years. Rev. Stephen Porter supplied for a year commencing October, 1827. Rev. Alfred D. Campbell began November 18, 1828, and remained over two years.

Rev. Samuel Whepley was installed September, 1831. It was during his pastorate of three years and over, that the building of the new church






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began, which was across the way on the northeast corner of Main and Church Streets and was erected in 1832. T1;le door of the old church was used for a bill board for putting up all important notices for the town.

At the time the new church was built the late General Thomas Rogers had the distinction of wheeling out the first wheelbarrow load of dirt. For further information about the Presbyterian Church of Palmyra, see pages 249 and 250 in this history.

THE  CEMETERIES

SWIFT  BURYING  GROUND

General John Swift donated the lot for the first cemetery in our village, which was just nortJ:1 of the Union Church on the west side of Church Street. In this old cemetery a good many of the old pioneers have been buried.

General John Swift, the founder and settler of Palmyra, was killed July 12, 1814, after serving a noble and conspicuous commission in the War of 1812. Several years after the close of the war the citizens of Palmyra disinterred his remains and deposited them in the old cemetery at Palmyra.

For a good many years not only the grave of General John Swift, but the whole of the old cemetery had been shamefully neglected and soon became overgrown with trees. and brush, which was an eyesore to every good citizen of Palmyra.

The James R. Hickey Post of the American Legion, realizing that state of neglect, undertook the great task of clearing up this forsaken place and for many weeks during the year of 1922-23, the boys worked diligently and with their untiring energy, succeeded in clearing up the place of unsightly undergrowth of lilac bushes that had become so deeply rooted that even the strength of a large tractor was but little heeded, and many times it was plowed and cultivated before it was in a satisfactory condition for planting. The markers were cleaned and set in concrete, a beautiful flower garden was planted, together with many shrubs which transposed this sacred spot into a place of beauty.

On Memorial Day, May, 1923, five trees were planted and dedicated to the comrades who had fallen in the five great wars, namely, the Revolutionary, The War of 1812, trhe Civil War, The Spanish War and The World War.

A large boulder bearing an inscribed bronze plate has also been placed on the grave of General John Swift. This monument is a dignified marker on the grave of such an illustrious patriot. It is the hope and wish of the American Legion that the Palmyra boys and girls of future generations will ever hold in reverence the name of General John Swift. May they too, be fired with loyalty and patriotic devotion which prompted such a man to give up his life for his country.

DURFEE  BURYING  GROUND

The oldest country cemetery, undoubtedly the oldest in town, is on the old Gideon Durfee farm, on the Creek Road, what is now the Newton Johncox farm. Evidently this was not at first intended for a town




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cemetery. Its lying back from the road would go to show it was more for a family burying ground. But as there was no other place, others were buried here until they numbered over 200. Like all other old burying grounds, a good many were buried here, who never had anything but a plank set up and when that rotted away their location was soon lost.

Long ago the old fence has rotted away and stock of all kinds has been permitted to roam at will over the graves of those old pioneers, and many times this sacred spot has been rooted up by the hogs. Such has been the fate of this old cemetery until the Spring of 192'5, when the Town Board, learning of this deplorable condition, immediately instructed Hiram O. Young, who was road superintendent for the Town of Palmyra, to build a new fence and clean up the ground, and it is hoped that the Town Board will see that a sexton is appointed to mow the weeds in this old cemetery the same as in others that have been mentioned.

Within the last few years, four of the old cemeteries have been favored. A sexton has been hired to look after the grounds and mow the weeds and grass twice each year. It is hoped that this will continue from now on. The first child that was buried here was that of Gideon Durfee and the first adult was James Rogers.

SANFORD  BURYING  GROUND

As we follow along further east we come to another burying ground lying on both sides of a lane leading to the Rowley farm. I have never been able to find out why the road ran through the center of this little grave yard.

CARPENTER  BURYING  GROUND

About a mile north of the churches on Maple Avenue, on the east side of the road is another old cemetery of which mention has been made while on our journey through the country.

George Carpenter, an old Quaker, who then owned the farm, out of the kindness of his heart, gave this little plot of ground to the neighborhood for a cemetery. No deed was ever issued for such an instrument of conveyance was not considered necessary at that time. A Quaker's word was law. Years passed on, Mr. Carpenter had died and the old cemetery began to be neglected. The old fence which had been repaired from time to time, had disappeared and the old cemetery nearly forgotten. Stock of all kinds was allowed to roam at large over the graves of the buried dead. Some of the stones had become broken. Many of the remains had been taken up and buried elsewhere. Money was not as plentiful in those days, as at the present time, therefore no stone was put up at a good many of the graves, and wooden slabs were often substituted, and when they had rotted away, the location of the grave could be traced only by a depression in the ground, where the coffin had rotted away. No simple stone was ever erected on which to mark their name and age. Kin and kindred have all passed away and no one is left to drop a silent tear, or to strew the beauties of nature above their graves. Weeds and brush had taken possession. The young hickories had grown to nut-bearing trees. In this lonely spot all was still, save the low and pensive sound of the wind,




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singing its sad requiem, mournful as a funeral dirge, as it rustled through the dead branches of the old dying poplar that had stood sentinel by the roadside for nearly a century, warning others that they, too must soon follow on. This was the neighborhood burying ground until 1844, when the Palmyra cemetery was etsablished. This being a more suitable place, a good many were transferred to the new cemetery, and the old burying ground was neglected, and as time passed on, kin and kindred have passed away and the little burying ground became practically abandoned.

Such was the situation of this resting place of those old pioneers until 1912, when Hudson Langdon, who owned the land all around the cemetery, came before the Town Board and offered to build a fence around this little plot of ground if the town would furnish the material. 'The Town Board at once accepted the proposal.

Mr. Langdon was appointed sexton for a sum agreed upon, and agreed to mow the lot twice each year and look after the ground. A few years later, Mr. Langdon died. Now Levi Haak has looked after the lot for several years.

OLD  EASTERN  CEMETERY

In passing I would say the cemetery north of East Palmyra also received consideration.

Kingsley Young being a member of the Town Board at the same time, said the neighbors would make a bee and build a fence around that cemetery if the town would furnish the material. To this they also consented and Veniah Green, an old resident, who 'had taken a great interest in this little cemetery, was appointed sexton, receiving the same pay as Mr. Langdon. Now these old cemeteries are still being cared for. As those two old cemeteries were public places for burial, and not private grounds, the Town Board felt justified in doing as they did in providing for their maintenance.

Those old Puritans, in belief and practice, acknowledged and reverenced God, and from village and hamlet rise the spires of churches, emblems of Christian faith and devotion; also establishing schools, believing education makes better men, better women and better citizens.

THE  NEW  CEMETERY

In 1843, Draper Allen, being president of the village, a special meeting was held on May 9, when five hundred dollars was voted to purchase a burying ground and to fence and improve it. The cemetery was established in 1844, Augustus Elmendorf being president for that and the next year. In 1846, David Hotchkiss, president, and Martin W. Wilcox, serving his ninth year as clerk, died in office. A vault was erected in the cemetery the same year. This cemetery is located in the eastern part of the village. The land was owned by the late General Rogers and was partly covered with timber, which he gave to the late Henry Addicott, for clearing it off. He subsequently became the first sexton in the new cemetery. The Rogers Memorial Chapel was built in 1866. It is of stone and owes its erection to a fund of $4,000, left for that purpose by Carlton H. Rogers, son of General' Rogers. In 1858, George Wheeler became Superintendent and held this




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position until he became old and decrepit with years and unable to attend to the duties required of him. He resigned and in June, 1895, George L. Clark accepted the position, which he is still holding with great satisfaction. Many beautiful monuments and a mausoleum have been erected, making this one of the most beautiful cemeteries in Western New York.

At different times the cemetery lot has been enlarged and in 1924, the late Pliny T. Sexton gave to the village, what was known as the "French Lot," with Mt. Holmes on the west, covered with primeval forest, that he also gave to the village. The winding road at its base, which will be improved in time, makes this a very picturesque drive, thus giving a beautiful view of nearly the whole cemetery.

THE  CATHOLIC  CEMETERY

Adjoining on the east is the Catholic cemetery, purchased by Father Casey in 1868, from Carlton H. Rogers, son of General Rogers, there being three and a quarter acres. He had it laid out and consecrated for a Catholic cemetery. Its entrance is from Howell Street. This cemetery is being improved each year. It is well cared for and within a few years a good many fine monuments have been erected.

OUR  CEMETERY  VISIT  ENDS

This concludes our journey thru the cemeteries. We have visited the old and the new cemeteries. In the old we were saddened to see them in a deplorable condition caused by negelct. Many of the first settlers of our town were buried here, with no stone on which to mark their name and age.

While in this new cemetery we find it well cared for, and many fine monuments have been erected in memory of departed ones. We also see stones on which the name is almost obliterated from the ravages of time. On some of the graves we can yet see the little flag fluttering in the breeze, notifying us that some soldier lies beneath the green myrtle, who fought for the stars and stripes. As I view this city of the dead, something within me says, after all, life is but a shadow.
Soon beneath the green pine tree my limbs will be laid,
And the earth will my winding sheet be.
A bed of green myrtle o"er my grave will be made.
None will plead for the remembrance of me.

The cold, chilly blasts will cast a sad gloom,
The winds of the midnight will sing for my dirge,
No friends or kindred will visit my tomb,
And I will soon be forgotten, like the foam on the surge.

THE SCHOOLS

FIRST SCHOOL IN PALMYRA

The oldest known school house in the town of Palmyra was' built 01 logs on the site of the old burying ground on Church Street, given by General Swift in 1793. But when the first church was built, this site was taken for a burying ground. Consequently this school house was of short duration.




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FEDERAL AND DEMOCRAT SCHOOLS

At a little later period, two frame buildings were erected, dominated respectfully, Federal and Democrat. So strong was the political feeling that the patrons of each party sent only to their own school. Blackmer was the teacher in the former and Ira Sibley in the latter. The location of one was on the corner of Main and Mill Streets, while the other was on the Creek Rc;>ad on a little knoll that has long since been dug away, located just east of the Pendry farm on the northeast corner of the road which at that time ran north up over the hill and joined the Marion Road at the Phillips farm as before mentioned.

DEMOCRAT SCHOOL

On August 21, 1813, the first meeting of the freeholders and taxable inhabitants of the sixth school district of the Town of Palmyra, County of Ontario (now Wayne) convened at the school house in said district by previous notice given for the purpose of carrying into effect "an act entitled for the establishment of common schools in the State of New York, passed June 19, 1812." Previous to this the schools were run by the neighbors who were most interested. At this meeting a moderator of the meeting was chosen, a clerk, three trustees, and a collector, who were to serve for the ensuing year. A tax of $20 was ordered raised for the purpose of furnishing fuel for said school house and to make repairs. Similar meetings were held annually. Wood was furnished in three foot lengths by the patrons of the school, the approval of the teacher being required to O. K. deliveries. Each member of the district was required to furnish fuel and repairs in proportion to the number of scholarsl he sent to scliool. Among· those who served as trustee will be found to be the first settlers, Christian Barnhart, Jonathan Dart, George Brown, Perry Davis, Henry Cobb, Barzilla Durfee, Edward Durfee, Elias Durfee, Gordon Durfee, William Gardner, John Gregg, Samuel Gregg, Ellery Hicks, Aretus Lapham, Abner F. Lakey, Isaac Matterson, Elihu Durfee, William Osban, Philip Palmer, W. P. Nottingham, Luther Reeves, Zebulon Reeves, Denison Rogers, Marcus Swift, Isaac Thayer, Asa Thomas, Edward Townsend, George Wilcox, Hiram Wilcox, Jordan Wilcox, Silas Williams, Weldon Williams and Kingsley Miller.

The names of some of the teachers are to be found, of the District No. 6, in a separate record of teachers themselves.

We find the following names: Calista L. Avery, who later became Mrs. William W. Edgerton; Elizabeth F. Lakey, who became Mrs. Tiller, who died in New Orleans a number of years ago; Hepsie E. Paige, Elizabeth D. Conant, who became Mrs. Butterfield, died in Michigan; Mrs. Cummings and Charlotte Conant, who were the last teachers. Miss Conant married William Pierce, who went to Michigan where he died over seventy-five years ago. His wife died in Palmyra in 1849.

After Miss Conant, the district was dissolved and the old school house that had become so dilapidated was torn down. The following is a list of Miss Conant's pupils:

Mary E. Warner, Ann S. Warner, Jane Van Orsdale, Julia M. Wilbur,




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Helen Brown, Pauline E. West, Sarah S. Huxley, Adelia Kemp, George Townsend, Thomas L. Cook, Sidney Brown, Albert Reeves, Reuben II. West, Frank Warner, Sarah J. Warner, Evaline A. Palmer, Emily VanOrsdale, Rowena Brown, Mary A. West, Sarah Denton, Mary F. Wilbur, George A. Warner, William Olvitt, George Wilbur, Spencer Brown, Charles Warner, Josephine Miller and Hiram Miller.

In the foregoing list, as far as I have been able to find out, Thomas L. Cook is the only one living now, 1931, that attended school in that old school house, eighty-five years ago.

In the early days it was customary for the teacher to "board around" and this scheme of division of labor and honor prevailed for some years. The price of board per week in District No. 6 was ten shillings and was to be annexed to the respective bills of teachers and collected of those who may be delinquent in boarding.

Five pupils seem to be the maximum number sent by any patron of the school of that district. School was maintained about seven months of the year. There are but very few living that ever knew that a school house ever stood there, or that a road ever ran up over the hill.

FEDERAL SCHOOL

Returning to the old school house on the corner of Main and Mill Streets: After several years the old school house had served its mission.

FEDERAL SCHOOL DIVIDED TO NO.1, 2 AND 3

Several meetings were held in view of dividing the village into three separate school districts, and in 1835 three school districts came into existence. Three new school houses were built, all made of stone. Number 1 at the east end of Jackson Street, No.2 on the northwest corner of Main and Carroll Streets, and No.3 on the east side of Throop Street.

These three school buildings served for educational purposes until 1847. When the school districts were consolidated into one district, No.1 was converted into a dwelling house and was sold to Henry Gardner. After his death John McLain purchased the property, and at his death the late Judge Charles McLouth bought the old school house, tore it down and erected a cottage on the same site. No.2 was used for a good many years by Joseph Gillett for a shoe shop; later by Andrew Pinkney for the same business. Its last occupant was Mrs. Bogart (colored) and at her death the old school house was torn down. Now it is a vacant lot in the P. T. Sexton Estate. The old school house on Throop Street was still standing in 1925, and nearly a century old. For a number of years after the school had closed a Mr. Mills, who was a shoemaker, lived here. His little shop is still standing on the south. The property has been in the Burns family a good many years. The last teacher in No.1 was John Vosberg; in No. 2, Henry G. Foster, No.3, Charles H. Graham, the latter at a salary of $21 per month.

Thomas L. Cook, the writer of this sketch, went to school here in the Winter of 1845. The teacher's name was Daggett, who lived in a brick house on the towpath on the east side of Railroad Avenue, which later




268


became the electric light plant. I also went to school here the following summer, Calista Conant being the teacher.

The books and rules of education were very different from the educational system of today. The ferrule and blue beach whip were the only sure remedies to make young men smart in those days. The pupil's future was decided by his ability to work the hardest sums. The spelling class was of great importance. The class was called just before school closed. Each scholar taking his position according to his merit on a straight cra'ck in the floor. After all had taken their rightful position the teacher would snap his fingers and say, "Hands down, heads up, toe the mark, attention;" then the work would begin. There was ever a strife to see who would leave off at the head of the class the most during the term. The contest was keen, for they vied with one another to win the laurel. Primitive as this may seem today, compared to the modern way of instruction, yet many of those old time spellers would well hold their own with those of more recent date.

Writing was taught by the use of a goose quill for a pen. Then came reading, ciphering and parsing. The English and Sanders spelling book was often used as a reading book; Mitchell's Geography was up-to-date.

This is the last of the old school houses built in 1835. It looks very much as when first built, only a little change has been made to accommodate its late owner.

The teachers and nearly all those that attended school have passed away, and it will be but a short time when only history can direct the inquirer where the old school house stood. It may be interesting to some to read a list of the nam.es of some of the scholars who attended school in the year of 1844 and 1845.

Among them were the Jessup girls, the Drummond girls, Charles Bristol, Harvey Bristol, Clinton McDonald, James Hibberd, John Hibberd, Ezra Hibberd, Henry Staring, Henry M. Johnson, Patrick Dillon, Mary Dillon, George Van Dyne, Charles VanDyne, Eliza Dart, Francis Dart, Edwin Barnes, George West, Harriett Dart, Franc.es Dart, Edwin William Jarvis, Franklin Huxley, Sarah Huxley, Alfred Rogers, Hannah Rogers, Mary Rogers, Orson Mortimer and Adelbert Soper, who were brothers; also Mary Soper, a sister, Samuel Mills, John Mills, Mary Mills, Albert and Harvey Wright and Thomas L. Cook. After nearly 86 years, I give these names from memory. The old records will have to reveal the rest of the names, for back in the dark shadows are more names that I have not mentioned. Of all those who attended there 86 years ago, I am the only one living now, 1931. James Hibberd, who came next, died a few years ago.

UNION SCHOOL No. 1 OF PALMYRA

These three old school houses were used as such until 1846, when several meetings were held with the view of consolidating the three school districts into one district which proved to be the final decision, dominated "Union School Number 1 of Palmyra."

This action took place during the Winter of 1846. An act was passed March 19, 1847, authorizing a levy for the purchase of grounds and the erection of a suitable building. A board of trustees was elected and




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consisted of A. P. Crandall, T. R. Strong and Pliny Sexton. It was agreed that the school should be continued in the three stone school houses during the year 1847. A school house lot containing two and a quarter acres was purchased from the heirs of Samuel Beckwith for $2,500. This lot was located on Canandaigua Street and the new building erected nearly in the center of the lot. The work of construction began in the Spring of 1847, and ended maybe 1848. The building was of brick, dressed stone for water table. It was seventy feet long and sixty feet wide and three stories above the basement.

The entire cost was $11,000. Elihu Hinman was the contractor. For his part of the work he was paid $8,000. The interest in the school may be inferred from the fact that at a gathering February 14, 1848, $800 was raised for the purchase of a library case and apparatus.

In front a heavy fence was built with square shaved posts and three 4x4 railings mortised in the posts, making a solid fence. A well was dug for the accommodation of the public of the district. In those days they burned wood and the basement was used for a storage place for the wood where it was sawed and carried to the different rooms which today would be no light task.

Perhaps it may be interesting to some to read the names of their father and mother or their grandfather and grandmother who attended Palmyra's first Union School, nearly 85 years ago; also the names of the teachers. The first faculty was: Justus W. French, principal; William M. Crosby, A. M., and Sarah D. Hance, Seniors; Charles D. Foster, Juniors; Clarissa Northrup, Juveniles; Edward M. Frenc.h, Melinda C. Jones and A. Maria West, assistant teacher of infantile department; E. Lusk, professor of instrumental music; C. D. Foster and J. C. French, teachers of vocal music; Dewitt McIntyre, demonstrator of anatomy and lecturer on physiology.

Following are the names of scholars in attendance:

Senior Department, Males
Robert S. Adams
Charles A. Allen
Alpheus D. Allen
Allen C. Arnold
Samuel Archer
Gilbert A. Ashley
Myron H. A very
Martin L. Bates
Mark Beal
Barton S. Boyce
George M. Bowman
Milton A. Brown
Jewett W. Brown
John M. Burt
Gannett E. Bussey
W. F. Capron
Dean H. Chapman
Chauncey Clark
Benjamin Cole
Charles C. Cobb
Luther B. Jagger
E. George Jarvis
Henry D. Jenner
Charles D. Johnson
Henry M. Johnson
Dwight Kellum
Thomas Knight
John H. Ledyard
Henry C. O. Lovell
Jacob Lusk
Charles R. Millard
George R. Miller
Samuel Mills
E. T. Nichols
G. N. Nichols
H. N. Nichols
Albert Niles
Henry A. Norris
George W. North
W. Nottingham, jr.
Henry E. Crandall
Martin C. Cranston
Albert B. Cray
D. O. Cummings
E. W. Cummings
Edwin Curtis
A. J. Downing
George D. Downing
Lemuel Durfee, 2d
Hiram Durfee
Avery S. Durfee
Joseph B. Eddy
Edward F. Eggleston
F. J. Eggleston
Horatio N. Fellers
Charles J. Ferrin
Warren Foskett
Joel R. Foster
C. Dwight Foster
Burdett Gibbs
John H. Gilbert
James B. Parker
John Payne



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Silas L. Pettit
William J. Pettit
Robert W. Pettit
John V. Perrigo
Melvin L. Post
William E. Power
John Pratt
T. R. Prichard
George H. Randall
Solomon Rathbun
Byron B. Reynolds
Nelson Reeves
Gilbert H. Reeves
David Reeves
Franklin Reeves
Porter Richardson
Horace A. Ross
Henry H. Rowland
Cullen H. Rogers
Walter S. Gilbert
William W. Gilbert
John S. Gillett
Russell Gillett
Oscar F. Gregory
William E. Grandin
William R. Hart
William H. Hazen
William T. Hall
L. Hammond, jr.
J. W. N. Hibbard
Marvin Hill
Benjamin H. Hoag
John R. Hopkins
Carlton S. Hoag
Myron A. Horton
Henry L. Howland
E. Huntington
James Hulburt
John Hulburt
Chauncey T. Hyde
Edward T. Roberts
Edwin S. Rush
Schuyler S. Sawyer
James Scutt
Alonzo R. Sherman
Daniel Smith
Jabez Soden
Judson Spear
Henry D. Stairn
Walter A. Stephens
Francis W. Stewart
H. R. Taber
Ransom P. Tibbits
Charles Titus
Henry Tracy
Sydney D. Tucker
Giles Warner
Henry Warner·
Rufus N. Wells
Samuel S. West
Elijah N. Wilson
Samuel B. McIntyre
Ambrose Jagger
Richard Emmons
William R. Everson
George Eddy
Darwin Eggleston
Eugene Elmendorf
Lucius H. Foster
Augustus Foskett
Charles H. Gardener
Stephen Gregory
Linus Gibbs
Joseph Gibbs
William H. Hilliard
Franklin Huxley
William Hibbard
Edwin H. Hayes
Norman L. Hayes
Silas Hulburt
George Hulburt
Stephen Hyde
J. W. Wigglesworth
Cyrus Wykoff
Charles A. Palmer
Charles Perigo
Ward C. Pardee
James W. Parker
Alfred Rogers
Isaac F. Ricord
William M. Risley
John Stead
Pliny T. Sexton
William S. Scantlin
R. W. Stockwell
James H. Smith
Alanson Sherman
Albert Sherman
William Schemerhorn
Henry Shoemaker
Edward Tappenden
William H. Tilden
Augustus A. Terry
Benjamin Jarvis
John Jarvis
James Jarvis
Charles W. Jackson
John Johnson
Jesse I. Jeffery
George W. Joslin
George H. Townsend
George VanDyne
Isaac S. Wilson
Legrand Wentworth
Charles Warner
George P. West
William M. Wykoff

Senior Department, Females
Mary S. Allen
Julia E. Anderson
Idalia V. Anderson
Sarah A. Adams
Hester A. Allen
Mary A. Bortles
Mercy A. Beal
Maria Birdsall
Ellen A. Bristol
Emily C. Benedict
Amelia S. Benedict
Elizabeth Bradford
Ellen L. P. Cuyler
Lucy A. Jagger
Mary M. Jarvis
Deborah Jarvis
Abigail Jackway
Emma C. Jaques
Catherine Jordan
Charlotte Johnson
Lois J. R. Lapham
Mary E. Lee
Elizabeth Logan
Harriet Miller
Harriet A. Moore
Amanda F. Mason
Evaline T. Cuyler
Sylvia C. Cuyler
Armanda Caldwell
Margaret Cray
Elizabeth Chapman
Mary C. Chapman
Maria M. Clark
Sarah J. Clark
Susan A. Clark
Louisa G. Chase
Mary Curtis
Mary J. Cummings
Amy A. Doty
Harriet A. Doty
Matilda Douglas
Mary A. Danford
Eliza J. Dart
Cornelia Drummond
Sarah Durfee



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Mary W. Durfee
Augusta C. Durfee
Ann H. Nickerson
Harriet A. Norris
Helen F. Newland
Elvira Newton
Catherine Nottingham
Louisa Nottingham
Maria E. North
Jane M. Parker
Mary E. Park
Caroline S. Potter
Louisa J. Pierson
Ma tilda J. Pickett
Eliza J. Patterson
Charlotte M. Pooly
Angeline Redfield
Lucretia Rockfeller
Laura J. Ross
Mary S. Rossman
Rhoda E. Randall
Maria Reynolds
Louisa Reynolds
Electa L. Eckler
Minerva A. Foster
Frances A. Foster
Emeline Foster
Clarissa A. J. Fisk
Elizabeth S. Gordon
Maria Garvey
Mary E. Gillett
Mary Gillett
Margaret M. Gillett
Emma L. Green
Sarah E. Gilbert
Mary S. Grandin
Agnes M. Goertner
Mary H. Hart
Sophia Hart
Phoebe E. Higby
Frances H. Higby
M. O. Heminway
Margaret Heminway
Roana Hurd
Helen N. Robinson
Martha M. Rogers
Mary C. Rogers
Hila Reeves
Lydia Saunders
Julia E. Sykes
Sarah E. Stead
Julia M. Sheffield
Harriet P. Stout
Mary J. Smith
Achsah A. Smith
Frances Springer
Ann M. Springer
Frances A. Tucker
Cordelia G. Throop
Arabella E. Treat
Josephine A. Treat
Marietta A. Tyler
Salome W. Turner
Mary Thurston
Mary E. Townsend
Cornelia Hamilton
Julia A. Hill
Lucy F. Hyde
Maria S. Holling
Sarah J. Holling
Elizabeth Howland
Mary E. Hinman
Emma M. Hersey
Sarah Hosmer
Jane Hosmer
Sophronia Henry
Mary J. Tibbits
Angeline Underhill
Sarah E. West
Harriet U. Wilcox
Mary S. Wilcox
Delia Warner
Wealthy Warner
Emma H. Wykoff
Mary A. Wood
Aurelia Van Winkle

Junior Department, Males
William H. Allen
Edson Barron
Joseph W. Brown
Henry T. Barnhart
Winfield S. Chase
Durfee C. Chase
H. C. Cummings
Bernard M. Casey
Franklin Kellogg
James Kent
Elisha Lewis
William M. Laughlin
Willard Milliman
George W. Mead
William W. Myrick
Henry A. Newland
Asher Cray
Morrison Clark
Thomas R. Clinton
Charles E. Cray
Theror S. Cherry
Adelbert Cummings
James Edgar
John Edgar
Charles R. Everson
Edward Eddy
Benjamin G. Evans
Henry Eggleston
Lycurgus Fuller
William G. Gilbert
Charles Granger
Francis H. Goddard
Marcellus Goddard
Hiram Gordon
William W. Gardner
John Huxley
Myron W. Higby
Larne P. North
Reuben O'Neil
James Palmer
John Mills
George F. Newland
Clinton S. Palmer
Charles W. Parshall
James Robinson
William T. Sampson
Robert Smith
Alexander Smith
John Smith
Charles Skinner
Robert M. Smith
George E. Stevens
John Soden
August L. Sanders
Thomas Stead
Henry O'R. Tucker
Thomas Tappenden
William Tripp
George A. Hart
Adolphus E. Hazen
John Hulburt
John Hibbard
Ezra Hibbard
E. Galusha Harrington
Albert Henderson
Myron Jarvis
William White
C. William Vorse
Charles Van Dyne
Lorenzo Van Dusen
Charles Williamson
John Williams
Truman Williams
Alfred Walton
Robert Williams


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Junior Department, Females
Maria A. Adams
Charlotte Adams
Margarette Bortles
Augusta Bortles
Rowena Brovvn
Frances C. Bartlett
Elmira Baron
Cornelia Buchanan
Eliza J. Bander
Caroline C. Clemons
Mary C. Lee
Mary J. Langdon
Catherine Lewis
Josephine Merrill
Zulemma Monroe
Mary A. Moore
Delia Milliman
Deborah Milliman
Maria Newby
Mary Newton
Mary J. Cook
Harriet Curtis
Abby Crandall
Mary Crandall
Helen Davenport
Josephine Dart
Ruth Durfee
Matilda Emmons
Ruth A. Gregg
Calista Goddard
Julia M. Gilbert
Mary Granger
Miranda Hibbard
Sarah G. Huxley
Harriet Hildreth
Eliza Hoag
Ellen E. Jenner
Sarah L. Jessup
Jane E. Jessup
Emily M. Jarvis
Elizabeth Jeffery
Mary J. Ketchum
Louisa E. Newton
Laura Osbond
Cornelia F. Palmer
Estelle A. Parks
Eveline A. Palmer
Hannah C. Rogers
Emily F. Randall
Amanda J. Reed
Jane J. Robinson
Hannah C. Stead
Ellen A. Simmons
Margaret Simmons
Harriet Sweeting
Lucy M. Stoddard
Susan M. Smith
Cornelia Tyler
Mary E. Williams
Rhoda D. Williams
Louisa A. Ward
Susan Withers
Cynthia A. Wilson
Mary F. Youngs

Juvenile Department, Males
Charles Anderson
William H. Adams
George M. Austin
James W. Austin
James B. T. Brown
Henry Birdsall
G. N. Bigelow, jr.
James Buchanan
Seymour Bander
Charles B. Bowman 
Wesley J. Barron 
John B. Cuyler 
Fred W. Clemons
George W. Cook 
Rufus G. Jarvis 
William Jarvis 
John Jeffery 
William Jenner 
Myron Knapp
Henry Kellogg
Edward D. Lamson
Andrew Larkin
John Little 
John G. Merrill
Frederick Merrill
Byron B. Mead
William Netteville
Hiram C. Miller

Juvenile Department, Females
Florence Anderson
Ann Brown
Ann E. Barron
Catherine Brown
Lydia Bingham
Julia Bander
Caroline Johnson
Isabella Johnson
Margaret King
Ann E. Ketchum
Julia Kellogg
Mary Laird
Mary Butterfield
Maria Buchanan
Martha Bowdish
Catherine Cuyler
Celestine Capron
Julia Capron
Sarah Crandall
Della Cray
Sophia Cray
Julia Chase
Clarissa Curtis
Mary A. Cooly
Lucy T. Durfee
Esenath Evans
Sarah Everson
Catherine Gregory
Martha A. Hazen
Gertrude E. Hinman
Catherine E. Hovt
Charlotte Millard
IVlary Myrick
Sarah O. Newland
Lucy Newton
Louisa M. Olivet
Mary Osband
Janette Pitcher
Celestia Priest
Ellen J. Richardson
Maria Ryan
Harriet E. Sanders
Marv A. Sanders
Sarah L. Scantlin
Mary Shove
Cornelia Strong
Helen Tucker
Martha A. VanDyne
Nancy Wilson
Mary E. Withers
Harriet Wright
Mary Foster
Sarah Furgy
Sarah Gates
Sabra Gates
Isabella Goertner
Margaret Garvey
Lucy Lakey
Alice Logan



273

Helen Myrick
Amelia Myrick
Louisa Martin
Josephine Miller
Maria Norris
Sarah North
Eliza O'Neil
Melissa Palmer
Jane Randall
Sally Ann Ricord
Ann Skinner
Caroline Sherman
lVlartha Stockwell
Julia Seeley
Martha F. Scantlin
Phoebe Ann Scott
Alice Tucker
Electa Jane Tripp
Frances V orse
Cordelia Higby
Harriet Hyde
Isabella Hyde
Martha J. Hilliard
Ann E. Hibbard
Jane Jennings
Harriet Jarvis
Jane VanOrsdale
Mary Vale
Helen Ward
Ann Wright
Anna Williams
Mary Wilson
Julia Wilber

Infanile Department, Males
Isaac M. Allen
John Avery
James Bristol
Charles W. Brown
George P. H. Bortles
William E. Buell
Henry Buchanan
Eugene Chase
Edwin Crandall
Isaac Crandall
Robert H. Crandall
D. Albert Crandall
Wm. Cummings
Edward Johnson
Francis Johnson
Charles A. Kellogg
James E. Kellogg
Edward Knapp
Leonard Knapp
Russell Knapp
Charles H. Langdon
Geo. D' Albert Laird
Henry J. Lee
Franklin Lown
Martin V. B. Moore
John E. Curtis
Charles De Clair
John W. Corning
Daniel E. Cray
Joseph C. Deming
James N. Drake
John Drake
William B. Drake
Philo N. Durfee
Bruce Everson
Gilbert F. Everson
Albert Eggleston
Jacob P. Fuller
William Garvey
Byron Gilbert
Charles T. Gilbert
Congo Grayson
Charles Gregory
Joseph H. Harrington
Edward Hart
Edwin Henderson
Thomas Hibbard
Isaac W. Moore
J. Alfred Newby
John Olivet
George Olivet
Henry O'Neil
Hall Purdy
George H. Quance
Charles E. Quance
Thomas B. Robinson
Theodore Ricord
William Sherman
William C. Southwick
Nelson Skinner
Frederick M. Smith
Delos Soper
Sherman Strickland
James E. Van Dyne
William Van Dyne
Stephen S. Ward
Peletiah W. Warner
Gilbert Williams
Henry Williams
Charles Hibbard
William H. Huxley
ames Jeffery
Wareham Wilson
Charles Walton
Richard Wright

Infanile Department, Females
Margaret S. Aldrich
Phoebe A. Avery
Electa E. Bartlett
Mary A. Bander
Mary A. Benedict
Anna Bigelow
Catherine C. Bowen
Betsey Bowen
Fanny Bortles
Rebecca S. Butterfield
Caroline Capron
Mary Capron
Mary Carpenter
Lavinia Chase
Esenath A. Cray
Elizabeth T. Cray
Mary E. Hulburt
Caroline Hulburt
Sarah Jarvis
Alice King
Fanny J. Kent
Melissa Knapp
Margaret Ketchum
Mary J. Laughlin
Charlotte Lee
Sophia E. Logan
Julia F. Lown
Louisa Logan
Amanda McManis
Eveline McManis
Julia M. May
Clarissa S. May
Sarah J. Cray
Georgiana Cuyler
Louisa Calhoun
Martha Corning
Rhoda A. Cray
Catherine Drake
Sarah Drake
Charlotte S. Durfee
Sarah Eddy
Isabella Flower
May Flower
Adelia Garvey
Eliza Gates
Helen Gibbs
Isabella M. Goddard
Rosealtha Goodell




274


PALMYRA  CLASSICAL  UNION  SCHOOL


Early in 1857 the school was incorporated as Palmyra Classical Union School. On April 18, an academic department was organized from the Senior and Junior departments.

The district was divided into nine sections and over each a trustee had supervision. Rhetorical exercises were required. On July 27, 1857, the principal declined to hold them and they were discontinued.

After nearly forty-two years of service this once fine new building began to get out-of-date. A change had to be made and what was the best thing to do, build a new school house or remodel the old one?

Several meetings were called. A good many heated arguments for and against a new building were had. It was at last decided to build a new one. Accordingly, in 1889, a new two-story edifice, much larger and more commodious than the old one was erected south of the old one, thus making the playground larger than it was before. The new building was equipped with all the modern improvements. Instead of being heated with wood that was sawed in the basement and carried to the third floor and elsewhere by hand to supply the stoves, it was heated by steam, thus making the halls as well as the rooms comfortable. It was lighted by electricity and water pipes were placed at convenient places with faucet and sanitary drinking cups. Fire hose was located at different parts of the building where it could be quickly and easily attached to the water hydrant. Fire escapes were plentifully supplied on which the children were thoroughly disciplined by practicing in fire drills at certain times, under the direction of the faculty, how to march out of the building in case of fire without being excited. On the south side of the building w:as a lawn tennis court, which was enjoyed by many of the young people of the village, while on the north side, those who wished to partake of the sport, could play base ball. From the flag staff at the top of the building the Stars and Stripes could be flung to the breeze. This emblem of our nation, the young were taught to honor and revere.

The new building served the district until 1924, when we find another new building under construction which I leave for the future historian to record.

THE  OLD  ACADEMY

It was a stock organization, incorporated around 1821 by James White, Orvid Lord, Henry Jessup and others, with a capital stock of $12,000. It was erected on Church Street, a little at the northeast of the present Catholic Church. It was a two-story building made of brick with stairs on the outside. A bell, the first in town, was in the building. There were two apartments in each story. Originally, a hallway led up fron1 the center, but later it was put on the outside to make room.

The school was incorporated as a high school. It absorbed the house and lot in District No.1. The old bell is now in the tower of the hose house. The hill on which it stood has been lowered ten or twelve feet.

Shortly after the advent of the Union School, the old Academy was sold to William F. Aldrich. In 1848 or 49 it was sold to the Romanists to be used as a church.




275


[ graphic ]

WILLIAM T. SAMPSON







276


WILLIAM T. SAMPSON

Speaking of the scholars who attended the first school in the first Union School house, built in our village in 1848: As we look over the names in the Junior Department, we find the name of a little barefooted boy born in poverty, who afterwards became one of the most distinguished men in the United States, and whose name 'was William T. Sampson, whose father, James Sampson, was one of three brothers, who came to this country from the north part of Ireland in the 30's.

About this time, Hannah Walker, the Admiral's mother, also came from the north of Ireland, but met her husband for the first time on this side of the ocean. The ancestral stock which produced this distinguished American came on both sides from the Scotch Presbyterian race that settled here. After living here a short time, they became acquainted and were married, and commenced housekeeping on the corner of Johnson and Vienna Streets, at the foot of Mount Holmes, in a house now owned and occupied by Mrs. Mary Parker, where Rear-Admiral William T. Sampson, the eldest son, was born February 9, 1840. The couple began a life of struggle to maintain a home on the simplest basis.

By rigid industry and strict economy his father had saved up enough to buy an acre of land off the northeast corner of the Cyrus Foster farm, at the south end of Prospect Hill on Johnson Street, for which he paid $80.00. ' About 1848 he built the present brick house, which is a single wall and contains 3,000 brick. These brick were made by Asher Cray, who had a small brick yard on the William Johnson farm, a few rods north of the Johnson homestead. Mr. Sampson worked for Mr. Cray in the brick yard and paid for the brick in work to build the house.

Later Mr. Cray started a brick yard on Railroad Avenue which was pointed out in our journey down that avenue. Several years after Mr. Sampson built the house, he bought four acres more off the Foster farm, thus making a little five-acre farm as we see it today. Here he lived and brought up his family, dying in 1881, leaving his wife, who was an invalid, three sons, and a daughter, Hannah, who tenderly cared for her mother until her death in 1892. At her mother's death, the place came to her. She subsequently married Alonzo Chase, a native of Walworth.

Now returning to the house on the corner of Johnson and Vienna Streets: From this house William 'T. Sampson, when but five years old, went to his first school in the little old stone 'school house on Throop Street, erected in 1835, and torn down in 1927. Calista Conant, a native of New Hampshire, was his first teacher. In 1848 the Union School building was erected, where young Sampson attended school, J. W. French being its first professor.

The moment school was out he joined his father, sawing wood, making garden and doing other odd jobs. While in scpool he was a diligent scholar, often snatching a few moments from his hours of slumber to keep at the head of his class.

Unlike other boys, he had no real boyhood, and never'knew what playtime meant. In 1857 Congressman Morgan, of Cayuga County, then representing our district in Congress, notified Palmyra through a communication




277


addressed to William H. Southwick, Esq., that a vacancy existed at the United States Naval Academy, which was at the disposal of the representative of this district and asked the Republicans to agree upon a promising young man for the place.

The position was offered to two or three young men, including Fred W. Clemons, who declined the offer and recommended Will Sampson, as he was called by his boyhood friends in school. Accordingly, his school friend and Mr. Southwick interview'ed young Sampson and his parents, and, after getting their consent, Morgan was notified and presented the application.

Young Sampson now bade farewell to his parents and the humble little cottage near the woods to enter the Naval Academy at Annapolis, and three years later he graduated at the head of his class.

In 1861, when the Civil War broke out, he saw service on both land and sea.

Sampson's first cruise was made on the frigate Potomac in 1861, and in this year he was promoted to master. The next year he was commissioned Lieutenant, and in 1864 he was detached to the ironclad Patapsco, one of the vessels blockading southern ports.

As executive officer of the boat, he was ordered to enter Charleston harbor and remove or destroy all submarine mines and torpedoes with which the city was protected from invasion. This was an exceedingly difficult and dangerous task, since the Confederates had devoted several days to stocking the water with these explosives to repel any advance. After fulfilling this commission, Sampson was detailed to the Colorado, and while on that vessel, he was made a Lieutenant Commander. From 1868 to 1886 he served his government, sometimes at the Naval Academy and sometimes as commander on shipboard. From 1886 to 1890 he was superintendent of Annapolis, and the next year he was placed in command of the cruiser San Francisco. In July, 1892, he was inspector of ordnance at the Washington Navy Yard and the next year he was made chief of the Ordnance Bureau.

In the navy he was regarded as an authority on torpedo work and his lectures delivered at the War College produced a great impression on the naval world.

He devoted to his country unsparingly, a brilliant intellect, cultivated by learning, directed by industry and inspired by patriotism.

Early in 1897, Sampson was ordered to the command of the Iowa. The destruction of the Maine and the stirring events which followed it, found Admiral Saicard in poor health and he resigned. Sampson was appointed to fill his place.

When war broke out he was made acting Rear-Admiral by President McKinley.

Once before in 1894, when President Cleveland found this country threatened by war clouds, he called his counsellors together, to choose a man to command our navy, should the war come. According to high authority, the President went slowly down the lists and stopping at a name he said, "There is the man. He should be commander of our battle squadron." Now, for the second time, Sampson had been selected, solely upon his record,




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above all his fellows, to lead our naval forces. On the third of July, 1898, the country was electrified by the news of the wonderful victory at Santiago, when the Spanish fleet under Admiral Cervera, was utterly destroyed by the skill and valor of American seamen, acting under. the orders of Sampson, although he, himself, was not on the spot, duty having called him elsewhere. The preparedness of our ships for action, after long weeks of waiting, when no fires were neglected, and every ship was ready for the supreme moment, has always astonished foreign observers and students of history. If fires had been low, with little steam in the boilers, the Spanish ships might have shot out to sea without chase. The blockade was one of the most wonderful examples of sustained vigilance and discipline ever heard of. An officer of the Iowa stated that a shot was fired in twenty seconds after the first alarm and in two minutes every gun was loaded and ready. Undoubtedly Sampson had placed the batteries on many, if not all, the ships, had superintended their construction, written the drill books, drilled the crews and officers and now had won the battle which ended the war and liberated Cuba. It was a cruel piece of misfortune that the Admiral, who had made every arrangement for the fight, should, by a mere chance of war, have been deprived of his active share in it, but he was not deprived of his personal share in it. His plans, arrangements, disposition of ships and men and their morale, and discipline, all attest to the genius which won the victory. His part in that victory has long been recognized officially, though at the time, he was criticized and called a liar and coward for claiming an honor that did not belong to him. The strain and responsibility of these long years of naval life, began to undermine his health, and on October 26, 1899,. he came home to Palmyra for a much needed rest.

Rear-Admiral William T. Sampson received the warmest welcome the town could give. His return was for a brief visit to the town and with friends who had seen him leave it as a boy, humble in circumstances, poor in everything but courage, energy, brains and character. And now he had come back after a long and brilliant career in the service of his country, with a fame that will endure for generations to come.

On October 27, 1899, a reception was given him in the Presbyterian Church. Hon. PlinyT. Sexton, president of the day, gave the address of welcome, and the response was given by Rear-Admiral William T. Sampson. Other addresses were given by Hon. Charles T. Saxton, Hon. Archie E. Baxter and Hon. Thomas Carmody. The flag was presented to Rear-Admiral Sampson, with address by Hon. Pliny T. Sexton, president of the day. After returning to Washington, D. C., he gradually gre"r worse. His illness brought on by the Santiago campaign, made him a martyr to duty, and on May 6, 1902, after a long illness, the news of his passing was received by his sister, Mrs. Alonzo Chase and other relatives in this village. Here in his home town the hearts of our people were saddened. Flags at half-mast waved a sad farewell.

At the funeral services in Washington, a remarkable assemblage of Naval Officers was present, also the President, Cabinet Officers, Supreme Court Justices, Congressional Delegates and foreign representatives came to pay highest honor to the dead hero. The services at Arlington were




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simple. At their conclusion a battery of the Fourth Artillery boomed out a salute to the dead. On Sunday evening, May 11, 1902, union services in his commemoration were held in the Presbyterian Church in Palmyra, which was crowded to capacity. They were held under the auspices of the G. A. R. Post of which Sampson had been a member. The order for the meeting was signed by Fred W. Clemons, commander, and Henry P. Knowles, adjutant. Resolutions of respect and sorrow were drawn up by the James A. Garfield Post and the Palmyra Steamer and Hose Company, the latter signed by William M. Parsons, President. Contrary to the expectations of the people of Palmyra, the interment of Sampson took place at Arlington National Cemetery. That his dust should mingle with the soil of Virginia, instead of his native state, was a matter of deep regret and was also not in accord with the expressed wish of the Rear-Admiral, that he might find his last rest in the peaceful ground of our beautiful cemetery and near the little cottage, which he had left in 1857 to enter Annapolis.

Rear-Admiral Sampson was twice married. In 1862 he chose for his first wife, Miss Margaret Aldrich of his native town, a daughter of David Aldrich and niece of Pliny T. Sexton. To them, five daughters were born. His second marriage was to Elizabeth Burling of Canandaigua, and in time two sons, Ralph and Harold were born into the family. At the bedside of the Admiral when he breathed his last, were his devoted wife and his two sons, aged fifteen and thirteen, and a daughter, Mrs. W. F. Clureris, wife of Lieutenant Clureris of the navy. His three other daughters, all wives of navy or army officers, at distant stations, were unable to reach Washington before the death of their beloved father.

Wearied and worn, frail in body, but intense in spirit, he struggled and toiled with undaunted heroism, that from him in grateful appreciation, the nation should realize the full fruition of his high sense of duty to his country.

Thus respected, admired and mourned by city and village, high and low, William T. Sampson reached the last harbor, faithful to the end.

THE SAMPSON GUN

Although mention has been made before of the Sampson gun, perhaps it would be interesting to some to know how it came into our possession.

On September 5, 1902, Village President John K. Williamson received




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a letter from Captain F. E. Chadwick, the commanding officer of Admiral Sampson's flagship during the Spanish War, which was as follows:

"I beg to ask if you will kindly telegraph me if there is any gun or other trophy of consequence of the Spanish War, in Palmyra; if not, I should be glad to do what I can toward obtaining some memorial of the kind which, I think, should exist at Admiral Sampson's birthplace."

Upon receipt of this inquiry the president consulted with the members of the board and many citizens, and while all were pleased and at once interested in the offer of Captain Chadwick, the question of a suitable location for the trophy, if accepted, was a matter which caused hesitation.

At this juncture our esteemed townsman, Pliny T. Sexton, who also greatly assisted in the correspondence that followed, proposed that if no better location should be found by the Board, the street lawn in front of the bank might be used. This proposition solved the problem, and the same day the president telegraphed Captain Chadwick favorably and wrote him as follows:

"To your kindly thoughtful letter, offering your services in procuring for Rear-Admiral Sampson's native place, some significant trophy of the late Spanish War, I have replied by wire that we have nothing of the kind, and would be grateful for whatever you may be able to send us.

"We have long been fully aware of your conspicuous loyalty to RearAdmiral Sampson, Palmyra's most highly cherished son, and this new testimony of your regard for his memory will be deeply appreciated by his fellow townsmen."

Next in continuation of the correspondence is a letter under date of September 8 from Captain Chadwick, which is as follows:

"I beg to suggest that if in case Rear-Admiral Sampson's native town, Palmyra, has no trophy of the Spanish War, that one of the captured guns should be sent there as a memorial to him and to his services. It would seem eminently proper and just to his memory that Rear-Admiral Sampson's birthplace should have such a memento."

Endorsement shows this letter to have been, on September 9, referred by the Secretary of the Navy to the Bureau of Ordnance for report and recommendation. On September 15, the chief ordnance officer returned it to the secretary, the same bearing this endorsenlent:

"There remains at the Norfolk Navy Yard one 14-centimeter Spanish trophy gun taken from the Oquendo and assigned to the Army in 1899. As no Spanish trophy guns taken at Santiago and assigned to the Navy Department are unassigned, except some rapid fire guns of minor calibre, the bureau recommends, in view of the appropriateness of the donation herein suggested, that, provided the town of Palmyra desires the gun, the Secretary of War be requested to transfer it t9 the Navy Department for assignment to Palmyra. In order to conform to the law governing the assignment of condemned ordnance, the request should come from the municipal council of Palmyra, that town agreeing to defray the expense attending the handling and transportation of the gun."

A further endorsement by the Secretary of the Navy, and forwarded t'o Captain Chadwick, made it necessary that the Palmyra authorities should




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make formal application for the gun, which action was taken at a meeting of the Board of Trustees held September 26, the following being a transcript from the village records:

"It having been made known, through the kindness of Captain Chadwick, U. S. N., that the Secretary of the Navy would, upon proper application, assign to the Village of Palmyra, in consideration of its being the birthplace of the late Rear-Admiral William T. Sampson, as a memorial to him, one of the captured guns taken from the Spanish naval vessels, which were destroyed at the battle of Santiago by the United States fleet under the command of the said Admiral, it is hereby resolved by the trustees df the village of Palmyra, that the president of the village be authorized and directed to make due application, in behalf of the village, to the honorable Secretary of the United States Navy, for the assignment to this village, of one of the Spanish guns mentioned in the foregoing preamble, to be held and cared for by the village as a fitting memorial of Palmyra's most distinguished and best beloved son, the late William T. Sampson, and that this village will most gratefully accept such a men10rial trophy and gladly defray the expense of the transportation."

A copy of these resolutions was sent by the President of the Village to the Secretary of the Navy, through Captain F. E. Chadwick, with a suitable expression to him of the grateful appreciation which the authorities and people of this village have for his intermediary and thoughtful kindness in promoting the procurement for the native plaee of Rear-Admiral Sampson, of so interesting and suitable a trophy of the late Spanish War, in which both, and together, the Admiral and Captain Chadwick rendered with conspicuous faithfulness, most eminent services to their beloved country. In April, 1903, the commandment in the Norfolk Navy Yard advised of the loading and shipment of the gun taken from the Spanish vessel, Alimiranto Oquendo and the fore part of May the same arrived at the Palmyra station, spiked with a Spanish flag.

President Sessions and the Board of Trustees at once took up the matter of its removal to the village and on May 15, the Board gave it official location upon the plot in front of the bank. On Memorial Day, May 30, 1903, Colonel Fred W. Clemons, in behalf of the Grand Army of the Republic, of which William T. Sampson was a comrade, gave an address in recognition of the reception of this grand memorial, and Hon. Pliny T. Sexton, a lifelong friend and admirer of Rear-Admiral Sampson, gave a brief and appropriate address.

After the death of Mr. Sexton, the property changed hands and the gun was moved into the village park where it still remains.

Palmyra may well be proud of her distinguished son. Born in our little village, in his school days he trod the paths of adversity, grasping the few scanty opportunities that chanced to come his way. With tenacity clinging to the line of his ambition, graduating with high honors at the head of his class at the Naval Academy, he entered the U. S. Navy in 1861, meriting every promotion, each time reaching a higher eminence.

With his knowledge and sagacity, he successfully planned the destruction




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of the Spanish fleet at Santiago, when his name and falne went all over the civilized world. Honored and revered by his own country for his valor, genius and untiring devotion to his sacred trust, today his name stands on the honor roll, with the most illustrious men of our nation.

For a time the chiseled marble may portray his face, and the engraved letters on brass may proclaim his worthy deeds, but long after the chiseled marble has crumbled into dust, and the engraved letters upon the brass have been blotted out by the ravages of time, then the indelible letters will still remain on the faithful page of history, which vvill be the greatest monument to his fame, fully substantial to sustain all the laurels that adorn his name.

THE  VILLAGE  HALL

This building was erected on the same site of an old tavern called the "Franklin House." The new hall was commenced in the Fall of 1866 by the contractor, Elon St. John and was completed early in January, 1868. The design was by H. N. White of Syracuse. C. H. Rogers and A. P. Crandall were the building committee. The whole building is 100 feet long by about 58 feet wide. The first floor is divided longitudinally by a broad hall. The Post Office was formerly on the east side, while on the west side are fire engine, Police Justice and Trustees' Room, with lockup in the rear for law breakers. The east side now houses one of the fire trucks.

The upper story is a beautiful room, seventy-five by fifty-five feet and twenty-four feet in height with an auditorium and stage. It will comfortably seat eight hundred persons.

On the west side of the downstairs hall are marble tablets containing the names of ninety-three soldiers belonging in Palmyra, who gave up their lives, a sacrifice for the unity of the nation. For many years these tablets were located beneath the stairway on each side, a most undesirable place, when it was decided to move them to the present location. A more conspicuous place could not have been chosen. Here in plain view to friend or stranger, who came to the Post Office, the court room or the opera, they could be seen and read by the old, the middle-aged and the young.

THE  POST  OFFICE

Palmyra was a post town while yet it belonged to Ontario County. In the early pioneer days the county was sparsely settled and the Post Office business was very light. There were no periodicals or other publications and only a very few letters passed through the mail. To save postage, many times letters were sent to friends by some settler returning East or perhaps a letter might be sent by some pioneer coming to the same township in which their friends lived.

The scanty mail was carried by someone following the trail on horseback, delivering the mail perhaps at some private house, store or tavern. For many years letters were written upon foolscap paper, doubled over, leaving the writing on the inside. The letter was sealed with sealing wax.




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I have before me now two old letters, one dated 1794, the other 1796, showing they had good ink in those days for they can be very easily read.

The exact date of the appointment of the first postmaster in Palmyra is enveloped in obscurity, owing to the destruction by fire of the book at Washington, but the records at the auditor's office furnishes good evidence that the office was established in September, 1806.

Azel Ainsworth appears to be the first postmaster in our village. Mr. Ainsworth kept a tavern where now stands the Methodist Episcopal.Church and in all probability the post office was kept here. Following are the names of the postmasters in our village and the dates which they served; also the location of some of the post offices:

Azel Ainsworth, September, 1806.

Ira Selby, in an old wooden store where the Williams Block now stands, June 16, 1814.

Lemuel Parkhurst, December 31, 1817.

Ezra Shepardson, October 23, 1818.

William A. McLane, November 17, 1819.

Joseph S. Colt, in the old wood and brick store, north side of Main Street, west of Markel Street and east of driveway, and east of Brown block, May 5, 1824.

Martin W. Wilcox, August 16, 1829.

Pomeroy Tucker, February 17, 1839.

David D. Hoyt, in his drug store, north side of Main Street, March 18, 1841.

John O. Vorse, east side of Market Street, two rods north of Main Street, October 24, 1844.

William H. Cuyler, where Cuyler block now stands, May 3, 1849.

William L. Tucker, in a little, low building with 9-foot posts, second store east of Cuyler Street, April 1, 1853.

William H. Cuyler, same place as before, April 20, 1857.

William H. Southwick, in Clemons block, May 28, 1861.

Charles J. Ferrin, in Clemons block, March 2, 1867.

Edward S. Averill, in Clemons block. Moved to Village Hall March 13, 1871, where the Post Office was located until 1927.

Wells Tyler, March 13, 1873,

Henry A. Chase, March 22, 1881.

Francis C. Brown, March 27, 1885. Joseph W. Corning, March 21, 1889.

Louisa N. Corning, June 23, 1890.

Daniel B. Harmon, August 29, 1894.

Jennie A. Harmon, June 4,1896.

Alex P. Milne, May 17, 1897.

Frederick W. Clemons, June 23, 1897.

Robert H. Bareham, June 22, 1906.

Samuel H, Hunt, January 11, 1916.

Ralph D. Sessions, December 6, 1921.

By 1894 the business in the Post Office, while in the Village Hall, had increased so much that during the occupancy of Daniel B. Harmon the Post




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Office was somewhat enlarged. But the ever increasing business loudly called for more room and more convenient quarters and to make further expansion in the Village Hall was out of the question.

The government demanded more room. In 1925 the Olin J. Garlock Co., Inc., purchased the Sexton property on the corner of Main and Williams Streets and in 1926 O. J. Garlock signed a contract with the government, whereby he was to fit up and remodel the old bank building and make it into an' up-to-date Post Office, suitable for the needs of the public.

As soon as the transaction was consummated, Mr. Garlock set himself at work to carry out the plan. J. Mills Platt of Rochester was the architect who drew up the plan that met the approval of the government and work was begun in September, under the direction of Arthur F. Burrows, a Rochester contractor. Emmett Murray had charge of the electrical work and the completion of the upper stories of the building. The Palmyra Hardware Co. furnished the heating plant and the plumbing. Thomas & Co. erected the copper basins and John Spanganberg had the contract for painting, and on Tuesday, January 11, Inspector Harry E. Nicholoy, under whose direction the building had been constructed, as a post office, pronounced everything ready for the opening 'On Sunday, January 16.

Mr. Nicholoy expressed himself as much pleased with the accommodations and equipment for the comfort of postal employees and prompt mail delivery provided by the O. J. Garlock Co., Inc., owners of the building. The Sexton building in its remodeled form will be known as the Garlock Building.

Postmaster Ralph D. Sessions and Olin J. Garlock of the O. J. Garlock Co., Inc., planned to have Saturday, January 15, opening day and to make this office memorable in the annals of Palmyra's mail service. Each person visiting the new Post Office was expected to register in a book provided for that purpose. Although a bitter cold day, between 2.00 o'clock and 9.00 o'clock P. M., more than 700 had affixed their names to the register, which is destined to be handed down to future generations as a historical record of the day's events. On Sunday, January 16, the entire equipment of the old Post Office was moved to the new quarters, ready to start business Monday morning, January 17, 1927.

As to location, equipment and convenience and for the size of our village, Palmyra Post Office stands second to none in the state.

Edward S. Averill was the last postmaster in the Clemons block and the first in the Village Hall.

Ralph D. Sessions was the last in the Village Hall and the first across the way.

Perhaps in the future it may be interesting to some to read the names of those employed in the Post Office and those who delivered mail in the village and country at the time they went into their new quarters: Postmaster, Ralph D. Sessions; Assistant Postmaster, Raymon Hartman; Clerks, Albert Quaife, Carlton Johnson, Glen Parker, Elton Vandeventer and George Beatty; Carriers, Earl Braman, Leo Beck and Benjamin Witherden; Rural Carriers, Hugh Stetson, Albert Powers, Edward Alderman and Fred Jones.




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THE  BANKS

The First National Bank building was erected in the late 20's of 1800 and in this building on the corner of Main and Williams Streets, on April 30, 1829, the Wayne County Bank of Pahnyra was chartered with a capital stock of $100,000. The president was Angus Strong, who was succeeded by Thomas Rogers, George Beckwith and Adam Spear.

The cashier was Joseph S. Fenton. The institution finally wound up its affairs and passed out of existence in 1840.

The Palmyra Savings Bank was incorporated April 12, 1842, but after a brief career, it went down.

In 1844 Pliny Sexton established under the then new free banking law, the Palmyra Bank, in the Lovett block.

Some time afterward, George W. Cuyler also established, under the same law, the Cuyler Bank, in the old offices of the Wayne County Bank. The business of both parties merged in April, 1853, and as partners they continued the business of banking under the organization of the Cuyler's Bank of Palmyra, Mr. Sexton giving up his office in the Lovett block and moving to the Cuyler block on the corner, with the following officers: George W. Cuyler, president; Pliny Sexton, vice-president; Stephen P. Seymour, cashier. This continued until the incorporation in January, 1864, by the same parties and their associates of the First National Bank of Palmyra, soon after which time the former State Bank was wound up.

The First National Bank of Palmyra was the successor' and outgrowth of the earlier banking business, and was conducted for many years in the former office on the corner of Main and William Streets by the late George W. Cuyler and the late Pliny Sexton. The directors of the First National Bank were George W. Cuyler, president; Pliny Sexton, vice-president; Pliny T. Sexton, cashier; William H. Cuyler, Charles McLouth and David S. Aldrich. The officers remained unchanged until the death of Mr. Cuyler in July, 1870. The vacancy thus occasioned was filled on December 30 of that year by the election of Pliny T. Sexton as president of the bank. At the same time, Robert M. Smith, who 'had been its teller for several years, was made cashier of the bank and Stephen P. Seymour was chosen its second vice-president.

On March 26, 1881, Pliny Sexton, the first vice-president, died, and on the thirteenth of the following month, Harriet H. Sexton succeeded him as director of the bank, and was also, on January 18, 1882, chosen as his successor as vice-president.

The capital of the bank at its organization was $100,000 with the privilege of increasing the same to $1,000,000, which latter amount by three separate additions it attained in September, 1882, and was the largest bank between Albany and Buffalo. The government bonds it deposited at Washington as security for the $1,000,000 in national bank notes it circulated, were for many years a prominent exhibit at the Treasury Department and were the largest of any bank in the United States.

At the death of Pliny T. Sexton, who died September 5, 1924, James H. L. Gallagher, Roscoe S. Bush and others acquired the controlling interest of the First National Bank, on Apri110, 1925.




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After doing business in the old bank for a time, new banking quarters were established on the corner of Main and Cuyler Streets, where they erected a new bank building, and on April 10, 1926, the new bank was opened, and the progressive policies of the bank continued until its assets totaled more than $1,000,000.

In 1922 a State Bank was opened on the northeast corner of Main and Williams Streets. It was incorporated on February 20, 1922, with the following named officers: John VV. Walton, president; Arthur T. Jones and W. Ray Converse, vice-presidents; Clifford G. Adams, cashier; Sanford W. Young, assistant cashier.

On August 19, 1922, the bank began business with deposits of $70,000, and in seven years increased its resourceR to more than $1,700,000. They . successfully did business until October 21, 1929, when the State Bank of Palmyra and the First National Bank of Palmyra merged, and on December 31, 1929, they changed their charter to the Wayne County Trust Company, with the following named officers: George L. Abbott, chairman of the board; James H. L. Gallagher, president; Clifford G. Adams, vice-president; Sanford M. Young, secretary.

Directors: George L. Abbott, president Garlock Packing Company; Clifford G. Adams, vice-president and treasurer; William II. Bowman, merchant; Roscoe S. Bush, president First National Bank, Marion, N. Y.; John J. Callahan, vice-president and treasurer, Dealers' Steam Packing Company; James H. L. Gallagher, president; Charles Lebrecht, clothier; William T. McCaffrey, president Lincoln National Bank and Trust Company, Syracuse, N. Y., director Union Trust Company, Rochester, N. Y.; Clarence C. Nesbitt, physician and surgeon; David S. Rutty, member Sage, Wolcott and Steele, Rochester, N. Y., director Garlock Packing Company; Charles A. Sessions, coal merchant: Ulysses W. Sherburne, agent Ford motor cars; Harry C. Stevenson, chairman of the board, First National Bank and Trust Company, Rochester, N. Y., president Rochester Folding Box Company; J. Foster Warner, architect, director Union Trust Company, Rochester, N. Y., director Stromberg-Carlson Manufacturing Company; 'Louis C. Ziegler.

THE  LIBRARY

It was on October 16, 1901, that the Palmyra Library Association came into existence. The library started in a very meager way in what was then known as the Tripp block on Main Street, now owned by John Shear.

The financing of the library was taken care of by the King's Daughters' Society for a number of years with the help of a few friends interested in this good work, besides having tag days. The first trustees of the association were Miss Anna Jackson, Mrs. Harriet Johnson Wardwell, Miss Jean Foster, Mrs. Jacob Crookston and Miss Myra Smith. The trustees at the present time are Miss Anna Jackson, Mrs. Charles Rumrill, Mrs. Charles Ziegler and Mrs. William Parsons.

All books, magazines and papers were donated by members of the King's Daughters' Society and citizens desiring to, contribute them. In this way the shelves began to fill and with money they purchased other books.




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f'fhe library now has on its shelves over 8,500 books. This library ranks second best in the state as to circulation, that is, with places supporting one library, there being given out about nine books to every person in Palmyra. Greene County comes first, circulating eleven or twelve books to the person. This speaks well for Palmyra library, and shows conclusively that her people appreciate the great opportunity offered them. The library has not been without its ups and downs during its twenty-five years of existence, and many a time it has looked as though the doors would be closed, but never have the trustees of the association given up and it always seemed as though Providence came to the rescue.

Now, through the generous gift of Pliny T. Sexton, it will not be without funds.

PATRONS  OF  HUSBANDRY

This organization is also known as the Grange, for the promotion of agriculture by abolishing the restricted burdens upon it by railroads and other corporations, and by getting rid of the system of middlemen and agents between the producer and consumer. In 1867 was organized the first Grange of the Patrons of Husbandry.

At first the progress was slow, but in 1872 the organization made a sudden start and began spreading all over the country, when in 1873 there were over ten thousand Granges and in 1872 the total membership stood at one million five hundred thousand.

A number of the enterprising farmers in this vicinity became interested in this organization and on February 25, 1877, George Sprague of Lockport, Niagara County, N. Y., secretary of the New York State Grange of the "Patrons of Husbandry," came to Palmyra in response to a petition signed by a few persons desirous of obtaining information in regard to the plans or purposes of the Grange movement with view to a local organization. William Strong of Clyde, a member of the Grange of that place, was also present as an assistant to Mr. Sprague.

At 2.30 o'clock, a score or more gentlemen rnet them in a private room of the Palmyra Hotel. The rise and progress of the order at large, with instructions how to make a subordinate Grange rise and progress, were clearly set forth by the above-named gentlemen.

A few faint-hearted ones turned back before putting their hands to the plow, otherwise into their pockets. The following-named persons, all farmers, accustomed to handling that implement, forked over the required stamps and were enrolled as charter members:
David S. Aldrich 
J. R. Foster
N. S. Backus 
J. P. Gillett
T. H. Chapman 
A. T. Goldsmith
J. O. Clark 
W. H. Kent
James Davis 
Norman Lapham
A. S. Durfee 
G. W. Marshall
J. R. Nottingham
Handee Parshall
Thaddeus Phillips
Nelson Reeves
M. B. Riggs
C. R. Robinson
E. H. Robinson
The infant Society was christened Palmyra Grange, without ceremony or sponsors.




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The following, irrespective of color or previous conditions of servitude, were elected officers:
Master -- M. B. Riggs
Overseer -- Handee Parshall
Lecturer -- G. W. Marshall
Steward -- Thaddeus Phillips
Assistant -- C. H. Robinson
Chaplain -- J. R. Foster
Treasurer -- A. T. Goldsmith
Secretary -- James O. Clark
Gatekeeper -- James Gillett
Ceres -- Mrs. Cordelia Chapman
Pomona -- Louisa Robinson
Flora -- Miss Frances Foster
Lady Assistant Steward -- Mrs. A. S. Durfee
The following added to those who claimed the right to say and pay for the absentees:
Mrs. Anna M. Clark 
Mrs. A. S. Durfee 
Mrs. M. B. Riggs
Mrs. Marie M. Clark 
Miss Frances E. Foster 
Mrs. Anna Robinson
Mrs. Cordelia G. Chapman 
Mrs. Emma O. Gillett 
Miss Louise Robinson
Mrs. Emma Reeves.
Messrs. G. W. Marshall, T. H. Chapman and A. T. Goldsmith were appointed a committee on room for the future meetings of the Grange.

After a brief lesson in the "A, B, C" of the Order, and a formal installation of the Worthy Master, M. B. Briggs, the meeting adjourned to assemble at the call of its superior and only qualified officer.

Their first meeting was in Oddfellows' Hall. The rent was $2.00 for each meeting besides the janitor's fees.

At a meeting held March 16, 1874, Handee Parshall, Overseer, thereby tendered his resignation, which was accepted, and A. S. Durfee was elected to fill the vacancy. All officers who were present were duly installed by Worthy Master Riggs.

It was thought best to defer action on all important matters necessary to put Palmyra Grange in complete working order, until after the return of the Worthy Master from the meeting of the State Grange at Albany on March 18 and 19.

Since the previous meeting, a dispensation had been received from the National Grange at Washington, setting forth that the organization was to be known and designated as No. 123 of subordinate Granges in the State of New York.

At a meeting, March 28, 1874, H. G. Foster, having duly applied, was voted a member of the Order.

Mrs. T. H. Chapman, Ceres-elect, resigned, and Mrs. J. O. Clark was chosen to fill the vacancy.

Brothers Kent, Foster and Durfee were constituted a committee on constitution and by-laws. An interesting report of the State Grange was given by Mrs. Riggs. At this meeting all heretofore absentees were installed. The perfect discipline of No. 123, if not evinced by punctuality,




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was evinced by the fact that ten members found their way into the room at intervals during the progress of the meeting. Anybody can be punctual, who comes in season, but getting into an open Grange when the door is closed and the proper officers guarding them, is business of which perhaps the less said and done, the better for all concerned.

At this meeting the first money was received by the Secretary, it being $5.00. Regular meetings were continued. Farm topics were discussed and a great interest was manifest. Speakers from different parts of the country were invited. A fine dinner was gotten up by the ladies, while the men sat around a cheerful fireside, discussing different subjects and keeping an eye on the table and watching the progress of dinner.

In 1906 it was projected that the Grange purchase a suitable site on which to erect a hall of their own. Different locations were suggested. At one of the meetings the present site was suggested, which met the approval of the Grange. An option was procured upon the property for two weeks that it might be brought before the Grange at their first meeting. An interview was held with Pliny T. Sexton, who owned the property. He at once became very much interested and made a very liberal offer which he more than fulfilled. He at once set himself drawing plans for a new hall, being assisted by Joseph Blaby, the architect, and the present building was planned. Pliny S. Aldrich and William Bush were appointed as building committee and preparations were at once begun for a new hall.

Thomas Jones & Son took the contract to do the mason work and Edwin Hurlbut took the contract to do the carpenter work. Bird & Ross furnished the heating plant and a Newark firm took the lighting. Palmer & Lyon did the painting.

The entire cost of the building was about $17,000. The following year the building committee was chosen trustees with John Walton added.

But the new hall in which the Grangers had anticipated so much pleasure and comfort for many years to come, proved to be a burden and disappointment to them.

The expense of janitor, light and fuel, besides interest, taxes and repairs, was so great that some of the members became discouraged and threatened to withdraw from the organization. Finally, about 1919, it was decided by the Grange to let it go back to Mr. Sexton, who held the mortgage, and the Grange moved across the way into the Red Men's Hall.

The Grange prospered under the leadership of Miss Kate Natt, who was the Lecturer for many years. Occasional speakers are invited to come. Fine dinners are served several times during the year and everyone is happy.

But when the older members of over forty years ago, that are living today, look back through the dusky past, and recall the scenes of their days, they find that all the first officers who took sllch an active part in the early existence of the Grange, have nearly all passed away, only one charter member living now, Mrs. Frances Foster West.

In 1929 the Grange moved back to the new hall that the Mormons purchased of the Sexton estate, as mentioned before, where they have all the conveniences that they had when the hall was first built.




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THE  PALMYRA  FAIR

It was in 1849 when Palmyra was to have her first fair. Although primitive it would seem at the present time, the zeal of the promoters of this enterprise of the people of both village and country would do credit to the people of today.

With no railroad, no trolley, no telephone or automobile with which to communicate with one another, consequently the solicitations for this project had to be made through the town on foot, in a wagon or on horseback. But the more enterprising farmers of the town were eager to avail themselves of this opportunity, and with village and country combined and working in harmony together, plans were soon made for Palmyra's first fair, which was to be held in Hathaway's grove, a grove of maple trees on the west side and south end of Cuyler Street. As everybody was interested and there being no buildings, no charge was made for entrance to the fair, and it being an experiment, everyone had to labor under disadvantages. Pens were fenced off in fence corners for sheep and hogs. Horses and cattle were tied to trees.

One man brought a yoke of steers, tied them between two maple trees that stood near each other, when up came a thunder shower and both steers were struck by lightning.

The late Burton Foster, who lived in the old Foster house on Canandaigua Street, now owned by Mr. Rumrill, drove a large hog across the field, and made a little pen in a rail fence corner for it. This hog weighed 800 pounds. John Robinson, an Englishman, who lived on what is now called the F. L. Reeves farm on the Creek Road, brought from England a stallion, a draft breed of horses called "Honest Tom," which proved to be too high strung for farm use. Later came a breed called "Sampson," that proved to be more docile. A short time after the fair, Honest Tom was poisoned by some jealous person.

During the fair they had a plowing match, and to fairly test the skill of the plowman and the value of his team, a field was selected on the Hyde farm on the Canandaigua Road, where all who wished, could enter the contest. I would say in passing, this field is one mile south of the village, where now stands a very thrifty orchard owned by Justin Perkins.

Richard Coates, a young Englishman, uncle of the late John C. Coates, who had recently come from England to visit his brother, William, entered the contest and won the prize. The team were a pair of old bay mares that weighed about eleven hundred pounds each. Although they were twentytwo years old, they seemed to take great delight in running away whenever there was an opportunity.

For the race track, that short strip of road just south of Foster Street was chosen. A few of the loose stones were kicked out of the road. Here only the fleetest were in the race. The excitement ran high and "Wash" Sherman, as he was called, and a good judge, took another "chaw of tabaker" and the race was over. But who can describe the fun.

These horses were mongrels. It was a rare thing in those days to see a thoroughbred horse or cow.




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Neither did the ladies' department delnand less praise and admiration. They selected for the display of their fine needlework and bed quilts as well as their culinary eKhibit, an old wood-colored barn, situated near the brook on the east side of Fayette Street, that belonged to Sherman and Crandall, carriage makers. This old barn, in dimensions, was about 26x30 feet. There was no floor above or below, thus leaving the entire building an open space. Tan bark was brought from an old tannery across the way and spread down to walk upon. The sides of the building were all swept and made clean on which to hang pictures. Ropes were stretched across from beam to beam where they could hang quilts.

An attractive place was provided for fancy needlework. Long tables were made on which to display the choicest fruits and vegetables, and flowers of brightest hue and sweetest fragrance, made this old wood-colored barn a thing of beauty, and the ladies named it "Log Cabin."

Entrance to the fair ground was given by letting down the old rail fence, and just at this entrance a man drove up with a barrel of cider which was in the rear end of an old democrat wagon. This he very cheerfully sold for two cents per glass.

Hard by another man sold tinware. He said he started from Virginia one very hot day, the river w'as frozen and he skated all the way.

Another man had a machine for testing the lungs. It was done by putting a tube into the mouth and giving a hard blow. He urged people to come up with an attempt to "blow your branis out." Every time a new customer came up, in order to have the 'tube. clean, he would wipe it off with his handkerchief. This same handkerchief answered for all day, if not through the fair. But of course, there were no such things as microbes in those days. These are some of the indelible remembrances of my first fair.

But the pleasure, the benefits and excitement of the little fair of 1849 could not be forgotten for the inhabitants of the town and village were so elated over its success that it facilitated forming the present Palmyra Union Agricultural Society. The date of this organization was June 26, 1856. At this time the following officers were elected:

President -- Martin Butterfield
Vice-presidents -- Stephen Hyde, William Teller, Russell Stoddard
Secretary -- Carlton H. Rogers
Treasurer -- Joseph C. Lovett
Directors -- Luther Sanford, Stephen K. Williams, Theron G. Yeomans, Daniel Gates, William H. Rogers, Jacob C. Pettitt.

Besides these men the following were charter members: L. Robinson, A. Sansbury, Joel Foster, F. D. Rogers, A. J. Downing, G. M. Briggs, J. G. Phillips, W. R. Johnson, George W. Cuyler, W. P. Nottingham, Alanson Sherman and William F. Aldrich.

The Society purchased about twenty acres of land of Daniel Gates in 1856 at a cost of $3,000 and built a floral hall that has been very much enlarged since.

The first fair was held in the Fall of 1856 and has been successfully continued annually ever since. The old primitive sheds have been replaced with others more modern and convenient.




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The grounds have been enlarged. A new dining room has been built to accommodate the ever increasing crowd of people that come from far and near to be in time for the famous dinners arrflnged by the different churches. Each church takes their respective turn each year in providing the dinners, which are a marvel, their name and fame having gone all over the country.

Convenient places have been provided for all kinds of stock so they are as comfortable as at home. In the early history of the fair, very little attention was paid to poultry, but it has developed into a great industry and a good house has been provided for this large exhibit.

Many a time a country boy would drive in a yoke of well-broken steers or a well-groomed colt. His heart would swell with pride and justly, too, when the judges awarded him the first premium. If a cow could make a pound of butter a day in the best of the season, she was considered a good cow.

Exhibition of speed was well looked after among those who took great interest in that part of the exhibit. Among some of the leading ones who took an active part in that exhibit were Washington Sherman, Charles Bingham, Charles Ferrin, Daniel Gates. and Underhill Briggs. Charles Ferrin's horse was a four-year-old colt, a mongrel, but it won first prize in that class.

Lucian Freeman, a boy of nineteen, who lived in Walworth, bought a colt for $75 anq came to Palmyra Saturday afternoons during the Summer and drove it on the track. It developed considerable speed. At the close of the fair he sold the colt for $300, very much to the amazement of the boys in the neighborhood.

Uriah Milliman, who was an old-time "Hoss Doctor," and lived in the Huddle, on the Walworth Road, and later came to Palmyra, had picked up somewhere, a blind pony, came rushing in on the track and passed everything on the course. He was ruled off the track as there was no class for him.

It is with great pleasure I record the name of Charles D. Johnson, who in 1878 was elected president of the Society and served in that capacity for several years, but by reason of his age and increasing infirmities he resigned. Mr. Johnson exerted his energies to his utmost extent to make the fair a success, and to him the people of the town of Palmyra owe a debt' of gratitude. To him the fair was his hobby, his recreation, and his pastime. He left no stone unturned.

Mention should also be made of the worthy gentlenlen who so closely guarded the financial interest of the Society. Among those of a later date were R. M. Smith, from February 4, 1874 to February 3, 1892, when he resigned, after serving eighteen years; also David S. Aldrich, from February 3, 1892 to 1896, dying that same year, when IIarry G. Chapman accepted the office which he has continuously held ever since, now being thirty-five years.

In April of the year 1905, the Society purchased about five acres of land from Charles L. Parker, administrator, adjoining on the west, for $1,000, and four years later the grand stand was moved from the east to




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the west side of the grounds and a large sheep barn was put up in its place, and other general improvements were made at a total cost for the year of $5,300.

Total receipts for the fair in 1874 were $1,111.75. Fifty years later in 1924 they were $7,146.47.

Premiums paid in 1874· totaled $500.00; premiums paid in 1924, fifty years later, were $3,067.00.

The total receipts of the Palmyra Fair in 192'9, amounted to $21,780.74, according to the report of the treasurer, Harry G. Chapman at the annual meeting of the Palmyra Union Agricultural Society. The receipts were $952.56 larger than the previous year, and included gate receipts of $6,093.10, as compared with a 1928 gate admission of $2,092.03. Premiums in 1929 were $6,089.62, as compared with $500.00 in 1874.

A number of permanent improvements were made in 1929. Permanent booths were built for the Home Bureau exhibits. Due to the increased numbers of entries of race horses, it was necessary to build a number of additional stalls.

Officers for 1931 were as follows:

President -- Charles H. Johnson
Vice-president -- Robert Coveney
Secretary -- W. Ray Converse
Treasurer -- H. G. Chapman
Race Secretary -- Earl Braman

Palmyra Fair now ranks one of the best equipped town fairs in the state.

If the patrons and promoters of this enterprise could come back to earth in this year, 1931, and stand on the balcony at tthe south end of Floral Hall and view the crowd of 20,000 people and see all that space inside of the circular track, with, twenty years ago, only a few carriages scattered here and there, now black with automobiles, covering nearly all that space, representing thousands of dollars, a thing unheard of then, would it be any wonder if they thought they had struck the.wrong town, for it surely could not be Palmyra.

The coming of the trolley and the automobile has made it possible for people living in a radius of fifty miles to take in the Fair and return home the same day with no inconvenience on account of the distance.

And the old farmers of long ago, who were accustomed to bring their best stock at the fair and compare those mongrels to the thoroughbred stock of today, and mark the advancement that has been made since the first fair in 1849, would exclaim indeed, "Our labors have not been in vain."

Automobiles and busses bring many to the fair and just before they enter the portals they pass under the same oak tree that stood there when the fair first started. Although but a small tree at the beginning of the fair, it has grown to its present size. "And may its shadow never grow less."

To some the Palmyra Fair is reunion day. Here old men and women, young men and maidens, men and women with hoary hair, faltering step,




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and pallid cheek joke with one another, for everyone is happy. With some, perhaps long years have passed since they left old Palmyra. They are coming back once more to visit the home of their childhood. They arrange to be here fair time for then they are sure to meet old friends.

They seek some little nook where they can sit down and talk over the past. Both parties have grown old since they last met. They shake hands w hen they bid each other a final farewell and the remembrances of this day they cherish as long as they live. But the sun is fast traveling toward the western hills, faces are now turning homeward, everyone is now rushing for the exit. Soon the ground is cleared. The gates are closed, and another Palmyra Fair has passed into history.

The writer of this sketch has attended every fair, including the fair of 1849, making seventy-seven fairs in all, now 1931.

THE  ERIE  CANAL

The agitation for an inland waterway through New York State goes back to 1773, when Christopher Colles lectured in New York City on "Inland Lock Navigation." In 1807, plans for the canal were under discussion and Jesse Hawley of Rochester vvrote several papers for the Genesee Messenger, under the name of "Hercules," urging the building of a canal from the Hudson River to Lake Erie. The value of this canal in the commercial development of New York City as a great part of it, would be impossible to estimate.

In 1816, Governor Thompkins urged the state to build a canal and appointed DeWitt Clinton to head a committee of which Hiram Hawley of Rochester was one of the members. In 1810, the New York State Legislature appointed a commission which made a survey of a proposed route.

At that time the surveying party found only a swamp on the present site of Rochester, while at Buffalo there were forty houses, some taverns and the Niagara County Court House.

The beginning of the Erie Canal was at Rome, N. Y., on July 4, 1817, when DeWitt Clinton and Joshua Hathaway turned the first shovelful of dirt. Some sections of the canal were opened to navigation in 1819 and on October 29, 1822, the first boatload of Rochester flour left Hill's Basin for Little Falls. The canal traffic in flour steadily increased and in the first ten days of navigation in 1823, two years before the final completion of the waterway, 10,000 barrels of flour were shipped from Rochester to Albany.

On October 24, 1825, the guard gates at Lockport were opened and water flowed into the canal so that transportation was possible over the entire length.

Guns had been placed along the canal froln Buffalo to Albany and thence along the Hudson River to New York City. At the moment that Governor Clinton started from Buffalo on October 26, the first of the guns was fired, then, as the sound reached the next gun, that, too, was fired, so that the reverberation was carried eastward until the final gun at New York City sounded just one hour and twenty minutes later. Quite a record for transmission of news in 1825, when radio had not been dreamed of.

"Seneca Chief" was the name of the boat that carried Governor DeWitt




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Clinton on his triumphant journey, drawn by four grey horses. Following the "Seneca Chief" was another canal boat which was familiarly called the "Noah's Ark," since it carried a cargo of birds, anirnals and fish from the Lake Erie Country, 'which were to be released when the boat arrived at New York City.

The signal cannon at Palmyra was on the hill at the north end of Liberty Street, since that time called "Cannon Hill."

At this celebration they came in from the countryside from near and far. For great was the joy to all those living within ten miles north or south of the canal for this waterway was not only to open up ai market for the products of the field from Buffalo to Albany, but to afford transportation as well in bringing merchandise to supply the wants of the pioneer.

Ultimately the canal was completed from Albany to Buffalo, a distance of three hundred and sixty-three miles, of much greater length than originally contemplated, but of less dimension in depth and breadth, being forty feet instead of one hundred and four feet wide and four feet deep, instead of ten, but the first intended size was the best, as proven by the fact that it was found necessary to increase the breadth of the canal to seventy feet and its depth to seven feet, to give the necessary accommodations to the constantly increasing traffic.

This was done at different times, commencing in the 40's, by doing a little each Winter. That part of the canal passing through on Canal Street was begun about 1849. The late Elijah' Ennis took the contract to build the culvert under the canal, beginning on the north side of the towpath and extending south to the Jessup tannery.

The aqueduct, west of the village, was built by the late Thomas Richmond in 1856. This was considered a fine piece of workmanship as it has proven to be, standing as solid as when first built.

As mentioned before, the canal was' used in places before its final completion, not only by freight boats but by packets as well.

"A Packet Guide for the Tourist and Traveler Along the Line of the Canals and the Interior Commerce of the State of New York," is the title of a small book written by Henry Gates Spafford, L. L. D., and printed in 1824.

These packets were drawn by three horses (see early history of Canal Street) from Utica westward. Two daily lines departed at 7.00 o'clock in the morning and evening for Rochester, one hundred miles, passing twentyfive locks, arid arrived in forty-six hours; returning from Rochester in the same order and time to Utica.

From Rochester westward to Brockway (or Brockport) there was a packet in July twice a day, nineteen and three-quarters miles, connecting with the lines eastward as to hours of arrival and departure; but the canal opened that Autumn to Lockport, sixty-three miles from Rochester, when a packet ran through that distance without a lock, probably between the rising and setting of the sun -- 1824.

Fare, including board, lodging and every expense, was four cents a mile. Way passengers paid three cents a mile, exclusive of board, and thirty-seven




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and one-half cents for dinner, twenty-five cents for breakfast or supper, and twelve and one-half cents for lodging.

Perhaps no one thing as a benefactor to Palmyra was ever received with such open arms and cordial welcome as the "Clinton Ditch," as it was called by the opponents of this great enterprise that proved to be one of the best investments the state could have made. The residents of Palmyra saw a constant line of boats pass night and day during the open season. During the year in which the canal was completed, there went by Utica, 1,311 boats and 40,000 people. In 1830, 14,936 canal boats came into and left the harbor at Albany, an average for the open season of sixty boats a day. June 15, 1827, sixty-seven boats arrived in Albany, carrying 14,000 bushels of wheat and other grains. Thirty-five boats cleared at the same time, with merchandise. On Saturday of the following week, fifty-seven boats arrived and ninety cleared, making an average of eleven boats for every hour of daylight.

When the canal was completed in 1825, they immediately began to build boats and in 1827 three hundred twenty-two boats were built; in 1828, one hundred twenty-nine boats; in 1829,. fifty-six boats; in 1830, ninety-three boats; and in 1831, two hundred eighteen boats.

It may be interesting to some to read the names of some of the oldtime boat captains, who ran a boat on the original "Clinton Ditch," in the 30's; also the name of their boat, which I give below:

William 1. Hart, Corinthian, April 27, 1833.
Milo Galloway, Comptroller, April 28, 1835.
R. R. Howell, Don, September 10, 1838.
R. C. Jackson, Dutchess County, April 16, 1835.
William and Harris Perkins, Florida.
George R. Smith, General Rogers, April 27, 1833.
James McDowell, Halifax, April 15, 1835.
Averston P. Crandall, Manhattan, October 1, 1834.
Silas W. Hutchins, Merchant, May 1, 1832.
L. C. Russell and Theron R. Howell, Palmyra, August 23, 1830.
James Field, Revenue Cutter, May 1, 1827.
Hiram Church, Etna, April 24, 1837.
Jabez H. Stark, Liberty, May 5, 1831.
James White, Paragon, May, 1827.
R. C. Jackson, President Jackson, July 28, 1832.
Abraham, Norris and John Maxwell, S. C. Jones, April 12, 1838.
James White and Hiram Niles, Columbian, May 8, 182'7.
Merritt Thompsori, Stranger, April 25, 1831.
Timothy Barnes, Vulture, August 18, 1827.
George C. Moore and William Cole, Wayne Sentinel, April 18, 1831.
Jonas Huxley in the 40's.
Franklin Huxley in the 50's.
Gilbert Oliver in the 40's.
William Foskett, 40's to 70's.
Augustus Soper in the 40's.



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Daniel Gates, Packet, in the 40's.
Charles Soper in the 40's.
William Henderson, 40's to 50's.

William Huxley was sent by Franklin Lakey up Cayuga Lake to Ithaca for a boat load of coal, making the round trip in four days, the fastest time ever made from Palmyra. Mr. Huxley is still living and is eighty-seven years old.

THE  BARGE  CANAL

A committee appointed by Governor Black in 1899, recommended that the canal should not be abandoned but enlarged. The Barge Canal Law of April, 1903, approved by the votes of the people, appropriated $100,000,000 to improve the Erie, Champlain and Oswego Canals, making the depth twelve feet, width, seventy-five feet at the bottom in land sections and two hundred feet in rivers and lakes.

Work began in 1905 and in May, 1915, the east part of the Erie branch of the Barge Canal was opened for traffic. The Barge Law provided only for boats of 1,000 tons, but locks were ordered from twenty-eight to forty-five feet, permitting locking of boats of 3,400 tons. The locks are three hundred and twenty-eight feet between gates, forty-five feet wide, twelve feet deep, lifts six to forty and one-half feet. There are thirty-five standard locks on the Erie branch. There are thirty fixed dams, the more important being on the Mohawk River below Schenectady, at Creysent and Vicher's Ferry, two thousand feet long and forty feet high. The 'eight bridge dams between Schenectady and Mindenville can be moved. The siphon lock at Oswego is the only one of its kind in the United States and the largest in the world.

When the Barge Canal went through the village of Palmyra, it swallowed up the Ganargua Creek at the aqueduct and its winding banks that the Indian had followed for ages for fish and game, and its waters that had afforded means of transportation to bring supplies to the pioneer have passed into history. The channel will soon be filled and leveled off and no one will be able to follow its course.

The young people of today can hardly realize the difference of the depth of the canal when first built, when the boats were mere canoes floating in four feet of water, compared to the Barge Canal boats of today in twelve feet of water.

THE  RAILROADS

Several attempts had been made to have a railroad pass through Wayne County, but failed until 1850, when a company was organized under the corporate name of Rochester and Syracuse Direct Railroad.

The road was begun in 1851. The contract was let and section shanties were put up and a large gang of Irishmen were employed with wheelbarrows, picks and shovels; also one-horse carts that were used for cuts and fills, very different from the steam shovel of today.

The first passenger train passed over the road May 30, 1853. At first




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only one track was laid, and only ten or twelve trains passed over the road in twenty-four hours. The engines were small conlpared to those of today. The freight and passenger cars were small, light and short. The rails were light and only sixteen feet long. The bridges were made of wood and seemingly large at that time, but one of the modern engines would crush one of those wooden bridges as easily as it would crush a pipe stem. The freight and passenger cars of today are much longer and heavier as well as stronger than the old wooden cars. The rails are also longer and very much heavier than the old rails.

A few years later a second track was laid from where Walworth Station now is, west to Rochester. At that time there was no station at Walworth. A switchman was stationed there to shift certain trains on the new track. Then later came the four tracks and the Walworth Station was created.

When the road was first built, instead of a pay car being drawn by an engine and guarded by men, on pay day an unguarded handcar came along with two men in front to propel the car, while Mr. Cunningham and Mr. McCall sat on a back seat, riding backwards with money box in front of them. When they came to a gang of men, they would stop, the men would come up, sign their names and draw their pay. Who would like to take that chance today?

A boy was stationed at each crossing to warn people of approaching trains.

The writer of this sketch was the first crossing boy at Walworth Station and held the flag for the first train that passed over the one-track road. This being aO main thoroughfare and a stage road from Ontario to Palmyra, there was a good deal of traveL Sometimes incidents would occur that would be rather amusing. One day a man had been down to Palmyra with a load of wild blackberries that grew in great abundance on the newly cleared land north of Walworth. After selling his berries to a good advantage he felt it his duty to celebrate just a little. When he arrived at the crossing, he inquired when the next train would be along and was told it would be one-half hour. He concluded to wait for he wanted his mare to "face 'em," and after sitting there a while he began to get sleepy and when he roused up he said, "I tell you, boy, this dry vleather tries the tire, drunk or sober." At that time a good many had never seen a train of cars. Many times they would come along and wait to see the cars pass by, and bring their wife and children to see the cars for the first time in their life. At that time wood was used for making steam instead of coal. Although the engines were small, yet they were great wood-eaters.

Before the railroad went through there were thousands of acres of heavy timber. At the coming of the railroad, speculators bought up the standing timber. Shanties were put up in the woods and the slaughter began, and in a short time large forests had been swallowed up in the fiery furnace, very much to the regret of the younger generation. The wood was drawn and banked at the nearest point on the railroad and from here it was carried to the different depots, where it was-sawed up. At the New York Central depot, which was then on the north side of the track, while on the




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south side was a long woodshed, thousands of cords of wood were sawed up. The late Sidney Hickox sawed wood here the year around with the old-fashioned tread-power to run the saw. The late John Calhoon wa.s· the first ticket agent at the Palmyra station. He lived upon the hill on the Walker Road on what was later called the Beadle farm.

William Whipple was the first baggage master. He lived in a little house on the hill. Mr. Whipple held this position until he became too old to do the work when he resigned. These two men died a good many years ago. Mr. Calhoon was in the employ of the company only a few years when he died.

Caleb Van Deuzer, Ralph Mumford and Morris Beadle were the veteran shippers of hogs, sheep and cattle. When these old pioneers of the road died, the business of shipping stock died with them. Cattle raising, and the same thing might be said of hogs, is a thing of the past in this part of the country. It would be a hard matter to pick up a load of stock now. At that time, if you were in Albany and wished to go to Buffalo by rail, you would buy your ticket to Syracuse, then to Rochester, and then to Buffalo.

Long years have passed and great have been the changes since that barefooted boy waved the first white flag for the first train that passed over the New York Central Railroad where Walworth Station now standsThen one track, light engines, light rails, wooden bridges, burned wood instead of coal, and only ten or twelve trains in twenty-four hours-Now four tracks, heavy engines and heavy rails, burn coal instead of wood, now one hundred and forty trains with one hundred cars each in twenty-four hours; also the block system and semaphores and many other improvements, thus making the New York Central Railroad the largest four-track railroad in the world.

The West Shore Railroad was built and opened in 1884. About two years later it was leased to the New York Central Company and used mostly as a freight road.

THE  TROLLEY

The time at last came when in December, 1904, the people were to have an electric railway running through Main Street. Starting from the center of the city of Syracuse, running west' to and through the center of the city of Rochester, with double track and a schedule that compared favorably and in many cases equaled the time of the New York Central trains, with seventy to ninety pound rails, concrete culverts, heavy iron bridges, rock and gravel ballast, steam turbine power plant and modern equipment; also shelters were provided at each crossing where cars were scheduled to stop, heated with electricity, with night signals, making one of the best equipped roads in the state.

The Rochester & Syracuse trolley line was sold in 1931 and work of razing the road soon began. The trolley was replaced by the Greyhound Bus Line with several buses running east and west every day.




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THE  GARLOCK  PACKING  COMPANY

Perhaps it might be interesting to some to give a brief history of the largest rubber packing manufacturing company in the world, which has its headquarters at Palmyra, N. Y. The company is known as "The Garlock Packing Company."

The story of the origin of Garlock fibrous packings is very interesting. Olin J. Garlock, in his youth, was employed by John Bulmer. The latter had a hobby of saving seemingly useless things, for some possible later use, and on passing through the boiler room of his shop one day, Bulmer came across a piece of old fire hose. He picked it up and tossed it to young Garlock with the remark, "There, Olin, save that, it might come in handy some day." Garlock laid the hose to one side for the time being. He was wondering how to stop a leak in the stuffing box of the engine in Bulmer's shop. He had packed the stuffing box so many times that he had almost become discouraged. As he sat before the old boiler, a thought came to him, "Why not use the old hose to pack the stuffing box 1" He got hold of a sharp knife and cut the hose into strips, and formed rings with the strips. These rings he tried to lubricate by soaking in oil. But as the rings took up the oil very slowly he set them in a can filled with oil on top of the boiler. This made the rings soak up the oil much faster. He then packed the lubricated rings into the leaky stuffing box, which had usually required repacking every few days, and to his great satisfaction found that the leak had been stopped. The stuffing box with its new packing stood up against the friction and strain for a long time.

Mr. Garlock told some of his friends and sold some of the new invention in small quantities to fellow engineers. H'e was handicapped by lack of funds to put his disc-overy into actual working order, and to market the new packing in any great quantity. In fact, most of the sales amounted to from fifty cents to a few dollars. The first packing for public use was cooked in an old kettle. Soon he used a piece of duck and rubber belting, cutting his rings from this material. In his spare time he made and sold packing. He tried to find financial backing but this was hard to obtain. At one time he had a partnership with his cousin, T. V. Garlock, but he soon became tired of the affair and sold his share back. Later he formed a partnership with George H. Crandall and in 1884 they entered into a three-sided equal co-partnership with Eugene E. Nichols for a period of three years. Toward the end of the co-partnership agreement Garlock and Nichols decided that they could no longer remain in business with Crandall so they looked about for a new partner. Garlock suggested his cousin, Frederick W. Griffith, who after graduating from college and teaching a year, had become convinced that teaching was not what he wanted. The deal was made early in the Summer but Crandall would not sell out nor let his buyer come near the plant until the expiration of the contract which was in September of 1887. During the Summer Griffith studied bookkeeping during intervals in the work on his father's farm. When he arrived in Palmyra to enter the business, he was driven by his father in a spring-back wagon from Phelps with his tin trunk carried in




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the back of the wagon box. Having learned something of bookkeeping he set up a new set of books for the concern, being their first set of double entry books.

The first co-partnership had done business under the firm name of Garlock, Crandall & Nichols, but the new partnership adopted the firm name of The Garlock Packing Company.

In the early days of business, it was carried on in one of the store buildings on Main Street. Later space was secured on the upper ft.oor of the old Jenner factory, which stood in the rear of the Garlock office, later being torn down. The business grew and developed until it occupied the entire building. In time they built an addition, three stories high, on the south and later on, as the business grew, two similar additions were constructed on the east side of the first structure. More land was purchased and a power house was built which in a few years was doubled in size. A two-story office building, which seemed quite adequate at the time, was built. It was soon found, however, that the business required larger quarters for an office. The Rushmore house and lot on Main Street was secured on which the present three-story and basement brick office building was erected.

In 1896 Eugene Nichols died. His wife, Edna R. Nichols, kept his share, appointing a man to take his place. Frank Brown was the first appointee. After his death, which followed soon after his appointment, James P. Ballou was appointed. Mr. Ballou held the position for several years when he left and founded the Dealer's Steam Packing Company, for the braiding of flax and asbestos packings. Clifford Platt succeeded him. Platt lasted one year when he was succeeded by James H. L. Gallagher in 1903. Mr. Gallagher held the position for twenty years.

As the factory progressed so did the office. In December of 1887 the firm hired its first stenographer, Emma J. Corson, who later for many years was the company's trusted cashier. xxx...about 1923, she was retired upon a pension and now lives with her sisters in Orange, California. A while later the office force was augmented by Lottie M. Seely, who was retired a year or two before her death. Then others came fast.

The Garlock Packing Company was incorporated in 1905 with a capital stock of $1,000,000.00, half Qeing in preferred stock and half in common. Each partner took $150,000.00 of common and the same of preferred, the remainder being held in the treasury.

Buying products from other concerns for finishing and sale had been rather unsatisfactory. The company had control of its braided products through the Dealer's Steam Packing Company, the majority of the stock being held in the same manner as the Garlock and by the same people. The company, however, had no control of tis rubber products. An interest was obtained in the Triumph Steam Packing, too, and the first building and boiler house were built near. the West Shore railroad station in 1907. This concern set up the manufacture of rubber slab, rubber sheets and an asbestos sheet to take the place of the Hungarian made "Tauril," which the company had been selling. In 1909 the rrriumph was merged with




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Garlock Packing, and as the company expanded they built at the West Shore location as the shipping facilities and chance for expansion were much better there.

In 1905 the Pitt Metal Packing Company of Ellwood City, Pennsylvania, was leased for ten years by the Garlock Packing Company. In 1915, it was purchased outright and moved to Palmyra under the management of Frank Ballou, brother of James P. Ballou. Upon his death, Edgar N. Fox, one of the old Pitt men, took over its management. Slowly it was merged into the rest of the concern until now it is an integral part. Mr. Fox is now spending his time in metal sales promotion in connection with the regular sales force.

The original Triumph plant was a single story with basement under part of it. During 1922, the entire basement was dug and added. To the west was built Plant 3 in 1909 to house the asbestos packing rolling tables and the coating tables. This "High Pressure" Depart.ment had occupied an old barn and a one-story wooden building on the east of the old No. 1 plant. Later the Metal Department moved into the one-story frame building. Plant 4 was built parallel to No.3 in 1912 with the factory office on the top floor, freight shipping on the main floor and the Mechanical Department under Judson Garlock in the basement. In 1914 two buildings were erected, No. 5 a Siamese twin of Plant 3 on the east of the earlier building and a western extension of No. 4, called No.6, to house the Express (and Parcels Post) Shipping Department on the main floor, the Flax Lubricating Department in the basement and the "Speeder" or Slab Ring Cutting and Lubricating Department in the east of the second floor with the H. P. Ring (and flax) Cutting Department in the west. Plant 5 had the 900 sheeters and the tables on the main floor with the Spiral Department and Valve Departments also using space there. The Spiral Lubricating Department was in the basement with the Valve Presses. Now the Spiral Lubricating and the 900 sheeters and tables have changed places and the Valve Department has been moved into its own building still farther to the east.

The building of Plants 5 and 6 completed the moving of the manufacturing to the West Shore plant and consolidated it at one location. The company next took up the manufacture of asbestos cloth. First trials were made at Hamilton, Canada, under Miller Adams and Harold Harmon. On January 1, 1917, Plant 7 was opened with a large dance on the top floor to which practically the entire village was invited. This new building was immediately fitted up with textile equipment and the manufacture of asbestos cloth began. Later economies in space permitted the moving of the Metal Department into the east end of the first floor and the Shredded Metal Department into the east end of the basement.

Raw materials were stored in basements, outbuildings or old No. 1, and a considerable amount of space was rented from the West Shore Railroad and George Bennett's warehouse for the purpose. Late in the Fall of 19213, a warehouse of concrete construction was begun to the east of Plant 4, this being of basement and single story construction with ramps for electric




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trucks instead of elevators. It was built to hold two more stories upon the top whenever they should be demanded. In the Summer of 1924, a cafeteria for employees was opened in the west end of the warehouse. The new Valve Department building was completed in 1929 in which year a large dam was placed across Red Creek to impond water for the rebuilt power plant which had been changed the year before.

Going back to the old No. 1 plant and the years of small beginnings, things were entirely different. "Uncle John" Garlock was the Superintendent and Johnny Lake was the Chief Cook. Jud Garlock did the repairs and maintenance and the few employees had much time for shenanigans between "licks." Seats became mysteriously electrified, cakes soaked in water descended from the heavens upon the unwary and Johnny Lake was forever searching for pieces of limburger cheese which materialized in his lubricating room. Horseplay in those days did no harm, but it has no place in the modern highly mechanized factory.

One day "Uncle John" had a tall, skinny red haired applicant who stated that he had just got married but didn't have a job. Uncle John thought that was pretty hard luck so he told the young man to come around next week and he'd find something for him to do. As the years rolled along, Uncle John became less spry and he began to turn over to the young fellow his work until he retired and the young fellow signed his name, John L. Travers, Superintendent. For almost twenty-five years "Trav" ran the entire factory, seeing it grow up to a large wooden plant and then slowly move to the new location in brick and steel buildings. In 1924 he quietly walked out of the plant and took over the Crandall factory. He is now Vice-president and Assistant General Manager of that company.

Cecil R. Hubbard came to the factory on October 1, 1923, as Production Manager. He has been in charge of the factory ever since.

The company never had a bed of roses, especially as far as sales went. Many of the branch managers became imbued with the idea that the packing business was an easy one to run and so throughout the life of the company, managers or groups of managers have left the company to start in business for themselves. Some have made good, others have failed and some are going along just making a living for themselves. As they were able to expand the sales force the partners did. The first branch office was in New York City. Now there are branches in New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, St. Louis, Boston, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, Denver, Birmingham, Montreal and Los Angeles. Finishing factories are located in Hamilton, Ont., Birmingham and San Francisco.

The company did foreign business almost from the start, although they sold Canadian rights to their patents and trade marks. These were repurc.hased in 1917. As the German boats stopped buying in New York City the company sent one of their salesmen, Jerome Grienenberger to establish a branch office and factory in Hamburg, Germany, about 1900. This continued until the outbreak of the World War. Another branch factory and sales office had been opened about 1912 in Paris, France. These were not reopened after the war. Goods are shipped throughout the entire




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civilized world and the Garlock name and trade mark are registered and established in all of them. Catalogues are now printed in Spanish, French, Portugese and Japanese as well as English.

The Garlock Trade Mark has been registered and established in all the civilized countries of the world.

Ward K. Angevine took O. J. Garlock's place on the Board of Directors in 1917 at Mr. Garlock's nomination. In 1923 George L. Abbott took Mr. Gallagher's place as the Nichols representative. At practically the same time Henry N. Winner was elected General Manager of the company. Mr. Winner had been